Small tank recommendations please ๐Ÿ˜Š

K8EM

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Hello there, new to the forum although not a complete newbie to the hobby. Not exactly experienced though so hoping for some wisdom with choosing a tank to set up along with my 5 year old who is fish obsessed! We used to have a 200L fluval which we had to empty a few years ago dye to space constraints (kept it in the shed though-just in case! ๐Ÿ˜‰) so just hoping to set up a small community tank we can spend time on together.

I'm looking at a Fluval flex 57l and a Ciano Aqua 60. Both similar capacity but different footprints-which I realise changes our stocking options. The fluval is more of a sort of cube shape which isn't as suitable for more active fish I've read whereas the Ciano is rectangular which I believe may give us more options re stocking? My main problems with the Ciano are that I know the filter is t the best and I want quite a heavily planted tank which I think the flex might be better for. Also, I much prefer the sunrise option on the Flex's lights-I always feel so sad seeing the lights snap on in tanks and startling the fish!

Anyone any thoughts or experience of either of these tanks? Happy to hear other recommendations too ๐Ÿ˜Š

Many thanks in anticipation of some help choosing!
 
I recently set up a Ciano Aqua 60 and am quite pleased with the tank though i see your point on the light. On my one the assembly of filter light etc was pretty easy but it took me a while to get the lid to click in place, the noise level of the filter is quite low and i like the idea of the interchangeable cartridges, my one never came with the fish dosanator health cartridges that you see in youtube videos, all in a good tank and i would recommend it.
 
Thank you! I do like the look of it, I just wonder if I'd end up spending more on it in the long run to upgrade the lights etc because I'd like lots of plants ๐Ÿค” But I do know the shape is more recommended as it gives more swim space.

Wondering now whether to just get a bare tank and add my own lights, filter and lid. So many choices and decisions!!
 
Thank you! I do like the look of it, I just wonder if I'd end up spending more on it in the long run to upgrade the lights etc because I'd like lots of plants ๐Ÿค” But I do know the shape is more recommended as it gives more swim space.

Wondering now whether to just get a bare tank and add my own lights, filter and lid. So many choices and decisions!!

The light in the tank seems very bright to me, I am not sure if that's a good thing or not for your plants your planning or is it a different type of lighting you need ? , one thing I would say is that I kind of wish id gone for the Ciano aqua 80 just for the extra size.
 
I just spotted that and I like the look of it! Started out looking at 20l shrimp tanks and this project is getting bigger and bigger ๐Ÿ˜‚
I'm just thinking of easy plants with low light requirements so sounds like it'll be fine. I like that fact that nearly everything comes included so we can just start cycling straight away. We live 2 hours away from our nearest fish store so it's handy to have it all in one package and no rush to get much else til we're ready for fish.
What are you keeping in yours just out of interest? Thanks for replying!
 
I just spotted that and I like the look of it! Started out looking at 20l shrimp tanks and this project is getting bigger and bigger ๐Ÿ˜‚
I'm just thinking of easy plants with low light requirements so sounds like it'll be fine. I like that fact that nearly everything comes included so we can just start cycling straight away. We live 2 hours away from our nearest fish store so it's handy to have it all in one package and no rush to get much else til we're ready for fish.
What are you keeping in yours just out of interest? Thanks for replying!

I know the way I keep googling bigger tanks :lol:

So in my one I have 1 neon, 5 glow light tetras, 1 aquatic frog, 4 endlers, 2 corys, 3 cherry shrimp. I am thinking of getting a smaller tank just for the shrimp and to separate out the endler males and females.
 
Is this tank going to be just for your 5 year old or for you too? If just for your 5 year old a 5 gallon is fine even though very restrictive as to the fish you can keep. If this is also for you you might consider something more like 20 gallons at least.

Not really putting down a 5 gallon tank as I've seen some that have blown my mind but they are very restrictive as to what you can keep. A few possible stocking ideas for a 5 gallon would be a single beta, some guppies or shrimp. Don't go with shoaling fish that need a large number such as tetras or corys... OK, some of the smaller tetras, such as neons, might be OK but I sort of wonder on that.
 
It's for his birthday but a bit of a project for both of us-he's nature obsessed so trying to encourage that and avoid the dreaded screen time ๐Ÿ˜„ I'd love a 20 gallon but for now we're very restricted with space. I've measured though and we can manage a 60l (14 gallon??) on a sturdy sideboard unit in his room. I'd just be worried about anything bigger ๐Ÿค” I'm planning a small tank of my own in another room so that if anything goes wrong with his we have an emergency tank already going to put his fish in (and vice versa). From what I've read a 60l opens up a few more possibilities for maybe some small shoaling fish and perhaps pygmy cories? Correct me if I'm wrong though please because I'm here to learn ๐Ÿ˜Š

Not hugely keen on the idea of fish in a 5g either, like you but I think shrimp look so interesting.
 
It's for his birthday but a bit of a project for both of us-he's nature obsessed so trying to encourage that and avoid the dreaded screen time ๐Ÿ˜„ I'd love a 20 gallon but for now we're very restricted with space. I've measured though and we can manage a 60l (14 gallon??) on a sturdy sideboard unit in his room. I'd just be worried about anything bigger ๐Ÿค” I'm planning a small tank of my own in another room so that if anything goes wrong with his we have an emergency tank already going to put his fish in (and vice versa). From what I've read a 60l opens up a few more possibilities for maybe some small shoaling fish and perhaps pygmy cories? Correct me if I'm wrong though please because I'm here to learn ๐Ÿ˜Š

Not hugely keen on the idea of fish in a 5g either, like you but I think shrimp look so interesting.
Sounds good but when it comes to stocking pay more attention to other advice as I'm pretty old school which said about one inch of fish for one gallon of water. There ARE exceptions to this but it is not bad in general.,

Also look up the mature size of fish, not the purchase size, as most fish are sold as juveniles. This often ends up with the population being fine when the fish are purchased but over populated when they mature.

I've never personally kept shrimp but, by reading posts here from shrimp keepers, they can be very interesting and fun and it would seem that a 5 gallon tank is fine for many species. LOL! Just stay away from Mantas Shrimp as they have ... I don't know what to call them so I'll use the word prongs... around their mouth that can snap at ~200 pounds pressure. This is their method for stunning and/or killing prey but are also known to break aquarium glass. Cool beasties but very dangerous in a tank of any size.
 
That violent shrimp sounds like far too much hard work for anyone ๐Ÿ˜‚ Think we'll steer well clear as advised! I looked them up though-very impressive!
Yes, fully grown size is a good point! I didn't think of that-thank you ๐Ÿ˜Š I'd like to keep it moderately stocked so that's something to add into our plans. So going by the 1" per gallon we could have up to 14" of fish in ours then I think. Going to give my son a few options of what would suit (I'll be back for advice about that at some point once were cycling and I can find out about pur water chemistry) but I'm hoping for a peaceful community with 2/3 species and some interesting behaviours for us to observe together.
 
I personally would not consider any fish in a 5 gallon, this is fraught with issues. The 15g is a much better option. You still want "nano" fish, which is a term for fish that at maturity are quite small, say 1 inch or less. These fish are more susceptible to water issues, but properly set up with regular maintenance you can certainly do it. I think the larger number of fish would provide more interest to your 5-year old too.

You want a sand substrate, no gravel. A bag of Argos Play Sand is fine, you won't need all of it obviously, but it is inexpensive. Some fish, like the pygmy cories mentioned, must have soft sand. Floating plants shuld also be in the tank, both for water quality and very importantly shade, as these fish (the nano species) do not appreciate overhead light, they can pale and be stressed.

What dimensions is the 15g, if it is an option? BTW, this is not light in weight, a 15g is in the neighbourhood of 150 lbs. so it needs a strong support.
 
You want a sand substrate, no gravel. A bag of Argos Play Sand is fine, you won't need all of it obviously, but it is inexpensive. Some fish, like the pygmy cories mentioned, must have soft sand. Floating plants shuld also be in the tank, both for water quality and very importantly shade, as these fish (the nano species) do not appreciate overhead light, they can pale and be stressed.

What dimensions is the 15g, if it is an option? BTW, this is not light in weight, a 15g is in the neighbourhood of 150 lbs. so it needs a strong support.
Oh brilliant about the sand! I've been scratching my head over all the options for substrates ๐Ÿ˜„ And that should be OK for the easier plants like Java fern and anubias? Any floating plants you can recommend? Really keen on them for the natural look anyway. Will that be OK with a sponge filter? Planning on lots of plants to help water parameters.

The tank is 60x30x30cm, so 54l but I understand that may not be the internal volume so I'll definitely err on the side of caution with stocking levels. The sideboard is solid, tested it by climbing on it myself ๐Ÿ˜…

And just to say as well, thank you so much everyone. I knew it would be a good idea asking on here because I've been a lurker for a while but I'm blown away by how willing everyone is to take their time to share knowledge with a complete stranger ๐Ÿ˜Š
 
Sounds good but when it comes to stocking pay more attention to other advice as I'm pretty old school which said about one inch of fish for one gallon of water. There ARE exceptions to this but it is not bad in general.,

Also look up the mature size of fish, not the purchase size, as most fish are sold as juveniles. This often ends up with the population being fine when the fish are purchased but over populated when they mature.

I've never personally kept shrimp but, by reading posts here from shrimp keepers, they can be very interesting and fun and it would seem that a 5 gallon tank is fine for many species. LOL! Just stay away from Mantas Shrimp as they have ... I don't know what to call them so I'll use the word prongs... around their mouth that can snap at ~200 pounds pressure. This is their method for stunning and/or killing prey but are also known to break aquarium glass. Cool beasties but very dangerous in a tank of any size.
Mantis shrimp are saltwater only.
 
Java fern and anubias should be attached to decor not planted in the substrate. Both have a rhizome which rots if it is covered. The rhizome is the thick stem-like thing which has leaves growing out of one side and roots from the other.

They can be tied on to decor with anything from sewing thread to fishing line, though that can be tricky without someone to put their finger on the knot for you (been there). Or they can be glued on with cyanoacrylate superglue. I haven't used this myself but I'm informed that the gel type is easier to get where you want it while the liquid type runs everywhere and turns white when wet.

Almost all other plants can be rooted in the substrate (there are a couple of others which should be grown on decor) and some stem plants can also be left floating eg elodea and hornwort.
 
Tying is a lot better than the glue. IME the glue tends to fail and the plant just pops off the rock or wood.
 

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