Setting up a saltwater reef tank

ChefAlex

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I'm confused right now. How should I set up the tank? What kind of corals? Canister filters are too expensive for me. Colin said no starfish, cleaner shrimp are fine and easy.
How should I do everything?
Check out the sources I listed above to get a good understanding of the basics of a reef tank, there is far too much information to disseminate in a single post.

You will get different answers from different people based on their experiences on how to best keep a reef tank. I strongly encourage you to do research beforehand, a reef tank is not similar to a freshwater tank in nearly all facets.

In a nutshell for your questions listed avove:
Stick to a standard method of cured rock, protein skimmer and water changes.
Keep soft corals only.
Yes, avoid seastars but shrimp are fine.
 
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Salty&Onion

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Wait.. sorry, one more question. My lfs does sell also those little about 2 1/2" or 3" cute crabs with the cleaner shrimp. Could I get one crab too?
 
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Salty&Onion

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What type of crab species?
I really don't know, but you could look at their website, it looks like they have only one type of the crab.

And I think this is the one:

 
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Salty&Onion

Salty&Onion

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Oh thank god. :rofl:
And also which species of shrimp are reef safe? :





 

Colin_T

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Hermit crabs will pick algae off the rocks so if you plan on getting a pygmy angel, don't have hermit crabs.

Any of the shrimp you listed are fine but don't mix the boxer shrimp (Stenopus) with the Lysmata or other species of shrimp because the boxers are much more aggressive and territorial.

If you get the Stenopus shrimp, buy a pair that are kept together otherwise they fight. If you can't get a bonded pair, just keep one in the tank.

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The Lysmata shrimp are hermaphrodites and you can keep any 2 of them together.
Lysmata amboinensis are social shrimp and can be kept in pairs of groups and will breed once a month after shedding their skins. These are one of my favorite shrimp and tame down very quickly and can be hand fed. They will regularly crawl over your hands or arms in the aquarium. If you can get any of the shrimp listed, these guys are the best to try.

Lysmata debelius is normally found individually or in pairs and costs a lot more than the other shrimp listed.

Hingebeak shrimp (camelbacks) are social shrimp that can be kept in pairs or groups. I haven't bred them so don't know how to sex them.
 
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Salty&Onion

Salty&Onion

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Thanks a lot Colin! ^_^ I'll get your favorite shrim, if my lfs won't have them, I'll just ask and see if they can get about 4 for me.
And I'll gt the hermit crab.
 

Colin_T

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Just get 2 shrimp to start with and see how you go. It's less costly to lose 2 shrimp vs 4. When the tank has settled down and you're comfortable looking after them, get more if you want.
 

Abzdot

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OP I have had saltwater for a while and when I started I was told to "go slow" and I bought a red fire shrimp for £34 (bad price) and died a few days later so I learn't my lesson. Also, with the idea of an anemone you really should wait 3-6 months for the tank to begin establishing. I'm not the best reefer but I speak from experience
 

Colin_T

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The reason lots of people use R/O water for marine tanks is to get cleaner pure water with no nitrates or phosphates. If your tap water is clean and has no nitrates or phosphates in, then you don't need to use R/O water for a marine tank.
 

ChefAlex

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The reason lots of people use R/O water for marine tanks is to get cleaner pure water with no nitrates or phosphates. If your tap water is clean and has no nitrates or phosphates in, then you don't need to use R/O water for a marine tank.
There’s more to the equation than nutrient levels. There are many things that a RO/DI removes that you can’t measure for. A big reason we no longer see so many threads on reef forums titled “why do none of my corals thrive, my water is fine?” Or “why do all my invertebrates die suddenly?” is because the hobby has strongly advocated the use of RO/DI. It’s as close to a must have as there can be in terms of reef equipment.
 

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