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Rocks For Use In The Aquarium

Discussion in 'Tropical Chit Chat' started by The-Wolf, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. The-Wolf

    The-Wolf Ex-LFS manager/ keeper of over 30 danio species

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    generally speaking gravel from a lfs will be inert.
    in some cases the gravel may raise the pH slightly
    but not by anything to worry about.
     
  2. Lateral Line

    Lateral Line It's full of stars
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    Why?
     
  3. The-Wolf

    The-Wolf Ex-LFS manager/ keeper of over 30 danio species

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    because plagioclase feldspar ranges in composition from Na[AlSi3O8] to Ca[Al2Si2O8]—sodium aluminosilicate to calcium aluminosilicate—and includes every mixture in between. it would be the aluminium part of aluminosilicate that would concern me.

    I've said this before, I am not a geologist, if people want to risk their live stock
    because a rock looks nice then that is entirely up to them.
     
  4. Lateral Line

    Lateral Line It's full of stars
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    I have an English "A" level Geology, and did the first 2 years of a Geochemistry degree before switching to biochemistry.

    There is a very big difference between metal salts, and silicates. Solubility product.

    Many metal salts, (ores), leach metal ions into water, not all, but a significant number. Things like Iron Pyrites, (fools gold), Chalcopyrite, Sphalerite, Cassiterite, Blende etc. will release some metal ions, but not that many. Most seriously polluting ore minerals, by the time they are found, have already lost the majority of the readily soluable minerals. The remaining stuff is still best avoided. The classic sign for ore minerals is "stones" that feel overly heavy for their size. A chunk of Galena will weigh a lot more then a similar sized piece of quartz for example. Many, Galena for example, (Lead Sulphide), also have a metallic look about them. Avoid heavy stones and stones that look like metal.

    Metals bound into the lattice of silicate minerals are just that, bound. They will not leach out, at least, not in any reasonable time frame. Plagioclase certainly is an unstable mineral, but it decays, (weathers), over millions of years, and its products, (largely clay minerals like Kaolinite), are also harmless. Consider, granite is largely a mixture of quartz, fjeldspar and mica, (which decays in a similar manner to fjeldspar), and is regarded as perfectly sound for aquarium use.

    Aluminium is one of the most common metals in the Earths crust, but almost all of it is bound in silicates where it is not economically extractable. The same is true of Iron and many other metals.

    Minerals such as Amethyst are totally inert. If you want to liberate the colouring metals, it is necessary to use some really serious chemicals, or physical processes, (electric arc spectroscopy), to establish their presence.

    As a footnote to the guy that bought some uncut emeralds, no, you have bought glass. When I was in Colombia in '96, about once an hour, some guy would siddle up and say he had uncut emeralds, bargain price, worth a fortune.....

    As a second footnote, labradorite is a key mineral in the syenitic rock "larvakite", (spelling varies), which is used as a facing stone for a lot of buildings. It appears dark blue but at certain angles "flashes", the "schiller flash". At university, it was colloquially known as "Barclays Bankite" as Barclays Bank often used it in their facades.
     
  5. The-Wolf

    The-Wolf Ex-LFS manager/ keeper of over 30 danio species

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    this topic has been here since Sep 2004 and now you decide to add your vast knowledge of geology to it.
    have you been waiting all this time to debunk me? is everything else I said wrong?

    note to all
    from now on I wont find research the rocks you ask about,
    you can either look then up yourself of get LL to do it for you seeing as he is a geologist and I am not.
     
  6. raptorrex

    raptorrex Inactive

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    this would be sad!!!!! i hope you will reconsider, as the help you have given so far, has helped many members!
     
  7. Lynda B

    Lynda B Member

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    sorry, that's just not acceptable..... :look:
     
  8. Lateral Line

    Lateral Line It's full of stars
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    I have not the time to read every thread on the board, I'd be suprised if anyone did.

    I came to this thread because someone PM'd me and provided a link to that fjeldspar piece and asked me if I thought it was right. I did not, and said so. I have no intention of debunking anyone, however, your conclusion in that case was incorrect. I assume the PM was from someone that had something containing fjeldspar in their tank, a lot of igneous rock, (rock formed from molten lava - generally looks like a mass of crystals), contains fjeldspar.

    I don't know, I was busy, I only read a couple of posts.
     
  9. marcan

    marcan Member

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    Hello everyone!

    I took a few rocks near a small waterfall...

    Most look like granite, am I correct?
    Can I use the red rock too? (right one on the picture)

    Thanks in advance for your help ! :)

    [​IMG]
     
  10. ilikebunnies311

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    how long should you boil the rocks for? like how many minutes?
     
  11. chibi

    chibi Member

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    I boil mine for about 5 minutes. :D
     
  12. halfbloodprincess

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    Does anyone know what type of rock this is?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And this one:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Both I have tested with vinegar and are fine.
     
  13. The-Wolf

    The-Wolf Ex-LFS manager/ keeper of over 30 danio species

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    both look like granite to me
     
  14. halfbloodprincess

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  15. The-Wolf

    The-Wolf Ex-LFS manager/ keeper of over 30 danio species

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    I've just read on another forum of someone who was boiling rocks and has ended up in
    hospital with serious burns and many broken bones.
    the postee is a police officer called to the incident and was warning someone else about boiling rocks
    in their thread about them.

    in light of this I have changed my original post and it now reads
    Also you should pour boiling water over your rocks or wherever possible immerse them in boiling water to clean them and to kill any unwanted bacteria that may be living on it. Do not boil or roast in an oven and never use a microwave to heat up rocks.

    I really can't tell you guys strongly enough about the dangers rocks and heat have, so just please all use some common sense
    and hopefully there will be no similar accidents to any of the members here.
     

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