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GaryE

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In medieval times, there was a huge movement within Christianity to withdraw from what the religious saw as a corrupt world of terrible people, and join isolated communities to pray and await the end of the world. Monks in that tradition took a vow of poverty, and often chose to live alone with no outside supplies on very difficult to survive on islands. The idea, loosely, was to atone for their sinfulness by creating enormous physical challenges for themselves, and put themselves in the hands of their God. These holy hermits often died from their quest.

They wanted simplicity, an escape from the money that's the root of all evil, and to show absolute dedication to their faith.

The were also monastic communities that tended to become wealthy, but they were a different strain within the Christianity of the times. They're the ones who get the bad press, as they had a liking for money that the others saw as going against Christ's teachings.

It's neat stuff. I am not a Christian but I have studied the history of Christianity. The evolution of religions is neat to look at, as for so long, these were the dominant ideas in many cultures. That period from about the year 50 to 1300 is quite interesting. I would recommend it for religious homeschoolers who aren't afraid to see different ways of thinking compared to some modern (post 1400s) versions. There were some bright people in the so called dark ages.

@Rocky998 , you sometimes sound like one of those people who yearned for entirely Christian communities sheltered from the rough and tumble world around them. The ideas you express are very old ones.
 

Rocky998

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In medieval times, there was a huge movement within Christianity to withdraw from what the religious saw as a corrupt world of terrible people, and join isolated communities to pray and await the end of the world. Monks in that tradition took a vow of poverty, and often chose to live alone with no outside supplies on very difficult to survive on islands. The idea, loosely, was to atone for their sinfulness by creating enormous physical challenges for themselves, and put themselves in the hands of their God. These holy hermits often died from their quest.

They wanted simplicity, an escape from the money that's the root of all evil, and to show absolute dedication to their faith.

The were also monastic communities that tended to become wealthy, but they were a different strain within the Christianity of the times. They're the ones who get the bad press, as they had a liking for money that the others saw as going against Christ's teachings.

It's neat stuff. I am not a Christian but I have studied the history of Christianity. The evolution of religions is neat to look at, as for so long, these were the dominant ideas in many cultures. That period from about the year 50 to 1300 is quite interesting. I would recommend it for religious homeschoolers who aren't afraid to see different ways of thinking compared to some modern (post 1400s) versions. There were some bright people in the so called dark ages.

@Rocky998 , you sometimes sound like one of those people who yearned for entirely Christian communities sheltered from the rough and tumble world around them. The ideas you express are very old ones.
That is very interesting!
Yah I don't believe in getting rid of money but I do believe in relying in God (not trying to get too religious).

I do want a life free from the pains of this world but nothing like what those monks wanted 😅
I try to obey the laws of God in the best way possible. The original ones. The last original ones set. Not after it being twisted to fit our sinful ways.
And I sometimes see things I do that aren't with those laws but I feel are still ok.
Like what meats are clean and unclean.
Pig is considered an unclean meat and shouldn't be eaten but I like pork and some forms of ham.
Now I have tried cutting back on how much I eat, but I don't believe that it's something that CANT be eaten.

I may decide to look at those times to see how the christianity changed and "evolved" during that period of time.
Thank you!
 

connorlindeman

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In medieval times, there was a huge movement within Christianity to withdraw from what the religious saw as a corrupt world of terrible people, and join isolated communities to pray and await the end of the world. Monks in that tradition took a vow of poverty, and often chose to live alone with no outside supplies on very difficult to survive on islands. The idea, loosely, was to atone for their sinfulness by creating enormous physical challenges for themselves, and put themselves in the hands of their God. These holy hermits often died from their quest.

They wanted simplicity, an escape from the money that's the root of all evil, and to show absolute dedication to their faith.

The were also monastic communities that tended to become wealthy, but they were a different strain within the Christianity of the times. They're the ones who get the bad press, as they had a liking for money that the others saw as going against Christ's teachings.

It's neat stuff. I am not a Christian but I have studied the history of Christianity. The evolution of religions is neat to look at, as for so long, these were the dominant ideas in many cultures. That period from about the year 50 to 1300 is quite interesting. I would recommend it for religious homeschoolers who aren't afraid to see different ways of thinking compared to some modern (post 1400s) versions. There were some bright people in the so called dark ages.

@Rocky998 , you sometimes sound like one of those people who yearned for entirely Christian communities sheltered from the rough and tumble world around them. The ideas you express are very old ones.
I think that it's worth saying that the majority of said monks were catholic.
 

Rocky998

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I think that it's worth saying that the majority of said monks were catholic.
I don't understand why that matters??
No need to bring up the name of any religious group.
In fact we shouldn't even be having this conversation
 

GaryE

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It's well worth saying that historically, you can't really find Protestant Christianity until the 1500s. Eastern Christianity was orthodox, and western was Catholic. The Gnostics, who were the closest to protesting against the directions things were taking, were very far from any modern version. They were wild mystics.
There were always "heresies", but if you examine them, they didn't speak in a way of thinking I've heard many write in the past few hundred years. Most of the Anabaptist groups, the ones that lead to the Amish type communities, started out quite communistic by modern standards. I haven't read anyone prior to Calvin who reminded me of modern fundamentalism. I'd love to have some serious leads on that, as it would be interesting.
Even the movement with the monks on islands wasn't so much Catholic as Celtic. There was a large division between the mainstream Christianity of Rome, which was to become the Catholic Church, and the regional form that had come out of Ireland and Scotland, and that gave us our hermits. The Celts were absorbed via a series of negotiated compromises by 1200, but were already fading by the 800s.
It's important not to look at the past as if it were today. Those modern lenses can distort.
I'm not a believer, just a history student. I like and respect ideas, and it's fascinating to see how they change and adapt over time. Re-examing history is great, rewriting it isn't. But we're a fish list and unless we're discussing whether Tilapia galilea is actually Sarathrodon galilaeus, and whether the trade name should be "St Peter's fish", The Jesus Fish" or the "Mango Tilapia", we'd probably best leave people in peace!
 

connorlindeman

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I don't understand why that matters??
No need to bring up the name of any religious group.
In fact we shouldn't even be having this conversation
Catholicism is a “denomination” within Christianity.
We are having a strictly historical conversation. I don't see why that would not be allowed.
 

Rocky998

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Well this conversation technically shouldn't even be happening... Just saying 🤣
 

Rocky998

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The mods would have stepped in if there was an issue
While I see your point of view I can see something spiraling from this peaceful conversation. I think it would be best to avoid any heated conversations that COULD come from this. That's all
 

JuiceBox52

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While I see your point of view I can see something spiraling from this peaceful conversation. I think it would be best to avoid any heated conversations that COULD come from this. That's all
I would agree to avoid heated conversations, if it gets heated the mods will step in, however for now it’s very civil and strictly historical sooo
 

Rocky998

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I would agree to avoid heated conversations, if it gets heated the mods will step in, however for now it’s very civil and strictly historical sooo
Yes it is. I just don't want it to end up like a heated debate
I think we've learned from experience on here in the past that not all things will remain civil. This thread is also way off topic. I recommend we turn the conversation back.
 

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