Orinoco biotope using the Juwel Lido 200 litre aquarium

elephantnose3334

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I'm planning to move my 6 existing cardinal tetras (they're almost a year old) into a much bigger tank than my current 10 gallon. I want to make an Orinoco River biotope with two native tetra tankmates: rummy-nose and red phantom. Cardinal tetras and the two tetra species mentioned are native to the Orinoco. Why I'm doing this? I don't want them to stay in that tiny 10 gallon permanently with the silvertip tetras. They harass the cardinals all the time since the dwarf gourami died. The silvertips can stay in the 10 gallon, whilst the cardinals will be moved into the Juwel Lido 200 litre aquarium. The tank itself is 71cm length, 65cm height and 51cm diameter. The only bad thing the aquarium has is its filtration system. Takes a lot of work to clean it and takes up a lot of space. I'm thinking of replacing that filter with an Eheim internal filter, if it fits. Have to ask my LFS for filter alternatives in the Juwel Lido 200.

Plants native to the Orinoco will include Ceratophyllum demersum (permitted in Western Australia), Sagittaria subulata and Helanthium tenellum. The substrate is a mix of natural coloured sand and gravel. I'm also planning to replicate the Orinoco's wet season (less water changes and gradually increasing the water level) and dry season (more water changes and gradually decrease the water level), too. I want to do this to make my cardinal tetras less stressed than they are right now. I'm trying to make the biotope as realistic as possible. This will take a bit of imagination and creativity in order to make it work. I'll add 3 new cardinal tetras with the existing ones to make a slightly bigger school. There will be 8 rummy-nose tetras and 7 red phantom tetras in the tank, gradually being introduced over time. Sketched some designs on pieces of paper (will add pictures in another post) and began experimenting with them.

Will my cardinal tetras be happier in that 200 litre aquarium? How do I move them into the bigger, more spacious tank? What can I improve on designing the Orinoco biotope?
 
Any filter will work in a Lido as it's quite a tall tank, you just need to remove the built in one first. When I had a Jewel Rio I removed the internal filter - with water and fish in. It's much easier to remove it when empty.
 
Sounds like a fun project. I have done a couple of Orinoco regional tanks (not exact enough on the plants to be true biotopes), including my current 150g, and I love the region. Yes, your cardinals will absolutely be happier in a larger group with more space, all other things being equal. Moving them to a new tank is no different than moving them from their delivery bag or from the pet store: catch them, put them in a small container (I like zip loc bags), float them for 20 minutes or so, and in they go.

Personally, I'd leave out the rummy noses and double up on the red phantoms. They are really beautiful, peaceful little fish, rather shy. I don't like the look of rummy noses, but that's just my opinion.

As for the tank design, a flooded forest can look really nice with schools of tetras. Wouldn't the wet season involve more water changes?
 
You mentioned in your journal that the dimensions give a volume of 235 litres. This is not the volume of water it holds as the lights sit below the top of the tank so the water surface has to be well below the lights.

With a footprint of 71 x 51 cm (28 x 20 inches) it can't be stocked like a standard shape 200 litre tank. Some of the fish you mention in your journal need a longer swimming length than 71 cm unfortunately.
 
You mentioned in your journal that the dimensions give a volume of 235 litres. This is not the volume of water it holds as the lights sit below the top of the tank so the water surface has to be well below the lights.

With a footprint of 71 x 51 cm (28 x 20 inches) it can't be stocked like a standard shape 200 litre tank. Some of the fish you mention in your journal need a longer swimming length than 71 cm unfortunately.
Oh, my mistake. I'm experimenting on some stuff i.e. alternative filter before the tank is made. I'm planning to add a small group of rummy-nose and red phantom tetras. I want to give my existing cardinal tetras a permanent new home with 3 new cardinals to make the school slightly bigger. I know there are some limitations on the tank, and I understand that. Vebas have a heavily stocked Juwel Lido 200 in their shop and the fish fit in here. The lights are on the top of the tank and needing HeliaLux Spectrum and its SmartControl for dimming and for different times of the day. I'm on the early stage of planning and thinking.
 
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You mentioned in your journal that the dimensions give a volume of 235 litres. This is not the volume of water it holds as the lights sit below the top of the tank so the water surface has to be well below the lights.

With a footprint of 71 x 51 cm (28 x 20 inches) it can't be stocked like a standard shape 200 litre tank. Some of the fish you mention in your journal need a longer swimming length than 71 cm unfortunately.
And yeah, I wrote the introduction to my journal earlier today. The journal is about my first attempt in making a biotope aquarium and experimenting some designs relating to the Orinoco biotope can be helpful. I have done some sketches of the Juwel Lido 200 with a few designs relating to the Orinoco.
 
If the light is a Helialux, that does sit on top on the tank. Does the Lido still have the bracer bar from front to back? If it does, that needs to be above the water line.

Just because a shop keeps certain fish in this tank doesn't mean they are suitable for the tank. Don't forget the golden rule of fish keeping - never listen to the advice of a fish store, or believe things they do are good..
 
If the light is a Helialux, that does sit on top on the tank. Does the Lido still have the bracer bar from front to back? If it does, that needs to be above the water line.

Just because a shop keeps certain fish in this tank doesn't mean they are suitable for the tank. Don't forget the golden rule of fish keeping - never listen to the advice of a fish store, or believe things they do are good..
I think it does. That's what I try to do. I try not to follow bad advice of my LFS but often fall from it.
 

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