My System No Dechlorinator

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Ch4rlie

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So my next question is how many of you follow the instructions. Or just say a squart plus one for the bucket.
Follow the dosing instructions on the dechlorinator bottle exactly to the letter, especially if one uses Seachem Prime.

No point in adding any extra ‘for luck’ or ‘just to be sure’.

As Bruce says, using a syringe makes life nice and easy for dosing, no excuses. Syringes are easy to come across to purchase online, all sorts of sizes available from 1ml to 10ml+, pretty inexpensive as well.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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Follow the dosing instructions on the dechlorinator bottle exactly to the letter, especially if one uses Seachem Prime.

No point in adding any extra ‘for luck’ or ‘just to be sure’.

As Bruce says, using a syringe makes life nice and easy for dosing, no excuses. Syringes are easy to come across to purchase online, all sorts of sizes available from 1ml to 10ml+, pretty inexpensive as well.
Another great use is for pulling out 5ml of tank water for testing.
So, so, soooooooo much easier than trying to fill the test tube to the 5ml line by dipping it in the tank. ;)
 

Uberhoust

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So my next question is how many of you follow the instructions. Or just say a squirt plus one for the bucket.
Don't see the need for accuracy in regards to the amount of de-chlorinator added. I don't know the starting Cl2 concentration, I know that my chlorine level is much lower now than it used to be in my old home. And I expect the dosage for the de-chlorinators is set for the normal or stronger concentration of chlorine in other areas. I personally expect I could half the dose and it would still remove the chlorine in my water.

So I typically round the amount down to the nearest 1 or 2 ml, and if I am close I call it good.
 

Ch4rlie

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Another great use is for pulling out 5ml of tank water for testing.
So, so, soooooooo much easier than trying to fill the test tube to the 5ml line by dipping it in the tank. ;)
I use a turkey baster for getting water from tank but have used syringes in the past for this too.

Also getting sample of water at least a couple of inches below water surface is important too as this avoids any potential surface scum that could affect test results.

So a syringe or baster is ideal for this.

And I know exactly what you mean about getting exactly 5ml into the test tube directly without syringe is a royal pain as you have to keep adding more water in or keep taking some out of tube and it’s real finicky to do accurately!

Good little tip for some readers I reckon :lol:
 
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I'm more of an outdoor/temperate fish keeper. Not as much tropical. I've forgotten to add dechlorinator a few times. Never killed any fish. I use Seachem SAFE. Made for ponds. I don't measure for the indoor tanks. A teensy pinch per water change and all is well. Never had any issues. My tap water reads .5ppm of ammonia so there is chloramine so I definitely prefer to use a product since it tends to behave differently than chlorine.
 

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Let me begin by pointing out that I have untreated well water, so conditioners are never needed or used...
However, I'll just add that the procedure suggested by @itiwhetu represents a significant risk to the stock.

As a youngster I remember my mother topping off her 5g metaframe aquarium with water from the tap with no conditioner. But it was a small town municipal supply that used very low levels of chlorine.

Then again some time ago the president of our fish club lost his entire fishroom after a partial water change and he had used a conditioner! Apparently there had been some water main repairs and the chlorine levels were significantly increased.

And also more and more municipalities are switching from chlorine to chloramine because unlike chlorine it does not readily dissipate and remains stable for much longer periods. So if a hobbyist has chloramine in their water, not using a conditioner would be fatal to fish.
I don't know if residents would be informed if a municipality switches from chlorine to chloramine.
 
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itiwhetu

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Thought I should get some figures. In New Zealand the Chlorine dose rate is 0.8mg/liter giving 0.5 mg/liter at the tap.
 
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itiwhetu

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Vacuuming the substrate does not remove bacteria. They produce a glue-like substance which is very strong. You’d need to scrub the substrate to remove them.

Chlorine takes about 24 hours to evaporate from water. What you’re doing is subjecting your fish and bacteria to non-lethal levels of chlorine every time you add water. They may have survived it for 40 years, but I don’t see that as an excuse for doing it.
For anyone reading this thread.... don’t do it. You’re stressing your fish every time, even if it’s just a little bit.
If it doesn't remove the bacteria itself vacuuming will remove the bacteria's food source. Never understood vacuuming tanks.
 

Ch4rlie

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If it doesn't remove the bacteria itself vacuuming will remove the bacteria's food source. Never understood vacuuming tanks.
Vacuuming does not really remove the bacterias food source, ammonia are their food source is it not?

What vacuuming does is very basically remove fish poop and debris that could cause a ammonia spike that could affect the livestock.

But perhaps more importantly maintaining your tank by gravel cleaning and doing water changes will help prevent old tank syndrome.

This is why vacuuming the gravel, I don’t mean really deep gravel cleaning though once in a while may help turn the substrate over to help stop anaerobic pockets but to keep the tank balance good by removing too much debris and fish poop which does accumulate is quite an important part of fishkeeping.

Does not have to be at every water change but once a month should suffice imho.
 
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itiwhetu

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Vacuuming does not really remove the bacterias food source, ammonia are their food source is it not?

What vacuuming does is very basically remove fish poop and debris that could cause a ammonia spike that could affect the livestock.

But perhaps more importantly maintaining your tank by gravel cleaning and doing water changes will help prevent old tank syndrome.

This is why vacuuming the gravel, I don’t mean really deep gravel cleaning though once in a while may help turn the substrate over to help stop anaerobic pockets but to keep the tank balance good by removing too much debris and fish poop which does accumulate is quite an important part of fishkeeping.

Does not have to be at every water change but once a month should suffice imho.
You get no anaerobic pockets with under gravel filtration and a gravel base.
 

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So my next question is how many of you follow the instructions. Or just say a squirt plus one for the bucket.
My dechlorinator says "1 drop per US gallon". My bucket is graduated in litres. So I add 2 drops, then run water into the bucket to the 8 litre mark.
Yes, I know I'm slightly underdosing as 2 US gallons = 7.6 litres and I'm adding the 2 drops to 8 litres.
 
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itiwhetu

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My dechlorinator says "1 drop per US gallon". My bucket is graduated in litres. So I add 2 drops, then run water into the bucket to the 8 litre mark.
Yes, I know I'm slightly underdosing as 2 US gallons = 7.6 litres and I'm adding the 2 drops to 8 litres.
Bruce is adding one drop per 8 liters ( assuming a drop is a mil )
 

Essjay

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There are about 20 drops in 1 ml. I need to check the actual number.

Edit - my 1 ml syringe contains 19 drops.
 
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