leveling a 125 gallon tank

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I just briefly discussed this with hubby, and he was thinking shimming the tank to make up for the existence of any tack strips in the rear would be preferable from the "kids in small spaces" as well as the aesthetic perspective. I'm not sure if that's feasible with this stand though?

I'm embarrassed. I didn't come close to considering mounting my tank with this degree of precision. It's the same size as yours MC, which means about 1000 pounds+ when loaded with materials and setup. I'm suprised that the two very strong young men ($50/per tip) who brought it in didn't suggest I take the install more seriously. :(

Good fortune with this endeavor, MC! :wub:
 
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mcordelia

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Haha, @663 it did not start out with this much care. We put it in place, filled the baby up, and then we were like, hmm, this has the potential to be bad. And then we emptied it and started thinking. I think had we been "ok" the first fill up, I wouldn't have worried much. But, as luck would have it, here we are. Might as well do it right if we have to put effort into this...
 
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mcordelia

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@Naterjm thanks very much for your in-depth explanation and instructions. I will try and find a time to do the level test thing with hubby later today, and ill upload the pictures of the bubbles in the level after that. Makes sense about both the center drain (not sure if it's got one, but this way we will know), as well as the settling. I would put my money on uneven settling, since before we bought the house, the seller had to re-pour the foundation under the garage due to one of the walls no longer being on the foundation. The clay soil here is sinister, it never really stops moving. We had the foundation and slab inspected by a builder when we bought the house so it's theoretically good, but on the other hand with stuff like that, could have been that the guy wanted to go on his lunch break so you never really know haha. Anyway, I'll post updates. And yes, we own, but hubby is not excited about the idea of putting holes in the wall since we are hoping to sell once both of us finish school (3 years left for me when I go back in the fall!) and GTFO out of here. Don't get me wrong, Michigan is a great state, buuuutttt, there's not a lot of good vertical hiking here :D
 

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Haha, @663 it did not start out with this much care. We put it in place, filled the baby up, and then we were like, hmm, this has the potential to be bad. And then we emptied it and started thinking. I think had we been "ok" the first fill up, I wouldn't have worried much. But, as luck would have it, here we are. Might as well do it right if we have to put effort into this...

I like your additude, MC! When I setup the wifes 75g planted neon tertra tank, I'll seek your advice. You and the hubbie. ;)
 
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mcordelia

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Ok, so sorry it's taken me a while to get back to this, 125g has been staring at me empty giving condescending looks for a couple weeks (yes, clearly this fishtank has the ability to make faces....). But, this morning we finally got the big level out again and started looking at what was going on.

Slab itself is unlevel, either due to settling or shoddy construction. Not level in a "marble is going to roll away from you" kind of way, but enough to pick up with a 6ft level. It's lowest at the lightest corner of the house lol, so that makes me think original work, buuuut who knows, they build on pure clay here since that's all it is with a super high water table, so could be settling as well.

Anyway, problem is slab, not carpet tack board. Thoughts?

@Naterjm sorry for the delay
 
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663

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A poorly built slab cobbled together by a moron 40-years ago? Hey wait, I live there too! :)
 
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mcordelia

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Haha, apparently the garage was at risk of falling over because the foundation was bd so the seller had to redo that before we bought the house. Apparently #2 the same wasn't the issue with this addition, go figure. If it wasn't the norm rather than the exception in this town, I wouldn't have taken a second look at this house. But, all inspections by multiple professionals gave it a green light. Go figure. One day, we will hopefully move back out east.
 

Naterjm

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Sorry for my delay.

I was quite happy being an active member here, but life has actually gotten quite in the way of that, and time reading and responding on this forum had to take the cut for a while, probably more so in the next coming months.

Slab itself is unlevel, either due to settling or shoddy construction. Not level in a "marble is going to roll away from you" kind of way, but enough to pick up with a 6ft level. It's lowest at the lightest corner of the house lol, so that makes me think original work, buuuut who knows, they build on pure clay here since that's all it is with a super high water table, so could be settling as well.

I would guess it’s a mix of both, and one more thing.

clay can wreak havoc on concrete. I had the chemical process explained to me years ago, so I can’t due it justice here, but what I was told is that clay can degrade concrete quite rapidly compared to concrete in other substrates.

clay has the ability to hold onto a lot of water, which concrete will readily absorb, in doesn’t compact very well when is wet and does not do well in the freeze/thacycle. Which paired with shoddy workmanship, high water table will lead to settling. It’s inevitable from what I’ve been taught.

Now that you have identified the problem, the only thing you can do is shim the stand level. You might need to get creative with how you cut/install shins, but basically, any part of the stand that it’s transferring weight to the floor will need to be supported down to the concrete.

Concrete floors that are not meant to be load bearing, sometimes are not poured with rebar to support the structure, so be prepared to shim your shims if that kind of weight starts pushing the floor down some more after the tank is filled. Especially if you’re on clay.

I may be nerding out and going way overboard, but without being that and seeing everything with my own eyes, I’d like be extra cautious with my advice...

*Edited for typos
 

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