ID new plants

OutOfTheBlue

New Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
For years I've only kept plants that don't require substrate, but recently I decided to redecorate. A few days ago I treated myself to a few new plants and I forgot to ask at my local aquatic store what they were. Silly me! Without knowing what the plants are called, I'm not sure if any of them should be planted in a shadowy corner underneath my water lettuce. If they all of them like a lot of light, then I have ample of brighly space available for them. Could any kind soul help me to ID plants on attached photos? Once I have the names I can Google their specific requirements. Thank you in advance!
 

Attachments

  • 20211122_155509.jpg
    20211122_155509.jpg
    195 KB · Views: 15
  • 20211122_155516.jpg
    20211122_155516.jpg
    208.9 KB · Views: 16
  • 20211122_155548.jpg
    20211122_155548.jpg
    179.1 KB · Views: 17
  • 20211122_155628.jpg
    20211122_155628.jpg
    312.8 KB · Views: 16
OP
OutOfTheBlue

OutOfTheBlue

New Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
Thank you both so much! You just saved me the disapointment of watching my new plants die and turn to mash underwater. I will keep Melon Sword in the darkest part of the tank and make sure that the leaves of the other 3 are out of the water. I just googled Draceana and Dieffenbachia and it looks like I'll be able to keep them both growing with only their roots submerged. They were underwater in my local aquatic store and they had no labels, so I foolishly assumed that this was how they were meant to be grown. Once again big thank you for your help!
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
29,147
Reaction score
13,279
Location
Perth, WA
First 2 are garden plants. Take them out and put them in pots with potting mix. Then keep them on the window sill.

Third picture looks like a palm that belongs in the garden.

4th picture has a red stripe plant that is a garden plant, and a sword plant that will grow in the aquarium.

--------------------
TRUE AQUATIC VS MARSH/ TERRESTRIAL PLANTS
Lots of plants are sold as aquarium plants and most are marsh plants that do really well when their roots are in water and the rest of the plant is above water. Some marsh plants will do well underwater too.

Hair grass is not a true aquatic plant, neither is Anubias.

Some common marsh plants include Amazon sword plants, Cryptocorynes, Hygrophila sp, Rotala sp, Ludwigia sp, Bacopa sp. These plant do reasonably well underwater.

True aquatic plants include Ambulia, Cabomba, Hornwort, Elodia, Hydrilla and Vallis.

The main difference between garden, marsh plants and true aquatic plants is the stem. True aquatics have a soft flexible stem with air bubbles in it. These bubbles help the plant float and remain buoyant in the water column.
Garden and Marsh plants have a rigid stem and these plants can remain standing upright when removed from water. Whereas true aquatic plants will fall over/ collapse when removed from water.
 
OP
OutOfTheBlue

OutOfTheBlue

New Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
This makes total sense. Thank you so much @Colin_T . So far I only had foxtail, hornwort, anubias, java fern and various floating plants. Anything beyond those is very new to me.
 

Wills

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Global Moderator
Joined
Jun 15, 2009
Messages
8,672
Reaction score
2,206
Location
East Yorks
First 2 are garden plants. Take them out and put them in pots with potting mix. Then keep them on the window sill.

Third picture looks like a palm that belongs in the garden.

4th picture has a red stripe plant that is a garden plant, and a sword plant that will grow in the aquarium.

--------------------
TRUE AQUATIC VS MARSH/ TERRESTRIAL PLANTS
Lots of plants are sold as aquarium plants and most are marsh plants that do really well when their roots are in water and the rest of the plant is above water. Some marsh plants will do well underwater too.

Hair grass is not a true aquatic plant, neither is Anubias.

Some common marsh plants include Amazon sword plants, Cryptocorynes, Hygrophila sp, Rotala sp, Ludwigia sp, Bacopa sp. These plant do reasonably well underwater.

True aquatic plants include Ambulia, Cabomba, Hornwort, Elodia, Hydrilla and Vallis.

The main difference between garden, marsh plants and true aquatic plants is the stem. True aquatics have a soft flexible stem with air bubbles in it. These bubbles help the plant float and remain buoyant in the water column.
Garden and Marsh plants have a rigid stem and these plants can remain standing upright when removed from water. Whereas true aquatic plants will fall over/ collapse when removed from water.
Really good write up :) Only thing I'd add is that some marsh plants have submerged and emerged forms, stalks and leaves take different forms which end up closer to how you described, wilting in the air etc Rotalas are a good example of this, thick stem with small round leaves on ground, thin stem, longer oval shaped leaves underwater. Crypts are an other example, when you plant them from the store the emerged leaves melt away and submerged leaves grow which usually look different.

Wills
 
OP
OutOfTheBlue

OutOfTheBlue

New Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
Yes you should hang them to the side of your tank so they can act as a filter and leaves dont rot
They don't have roots yet, so I hanged them on the side of the tank. Right now only bottom 1 inch of each stem is submerged and all leaves are above the water surface. Should I add any specific fertiliser to encourage the growth of the new roots? Are they going to be OK with a standard aquarium liquid fertiliser? I use Easy Life Pro Fito and Easy Life Pro Carbo for other plants in my aquarium. I assume that should also work well for the Draceana and Dieffenbachi once their roots are big enough to absorbe nutrients from the water.

My Google search suggested that Dieffenbachi may not be entirely safe if ingested by fish. My plecos don't eat plants, but they like hanging on them and snacking on algae. Should I worry?
 

Sgooosh

Fish Aficionado
Joined
Dec 3, 2020
Messages
4,591
Reaction score
1,714
Location
United States
i think the normal liquid ferts would work, terrestrial plants are not that picky
my dracanea is fine next to the filter where fish poopy water is blown onto it and i add flourish liquid fert
They don't have roots yet, so I hanged them on the side of the tank. Right now only bottom 1 inch of each stem is submerged and all leaves are above the water surface. Should I add any specific fertiliser to encourage the growth of the new roots? Are they going to be OK with a standard aquarium liquid fertiliser? I use Easy Life Pro Fito and Easy Life Pro Carbo for other plants in my aquarium. I assume that should also work well for the Draceana and Dieffenbachi once their roots are big enough to absorbe nutrients from the water.

My Google search suggested that Dieffenbachi may not be entirely safe if ingested by fish. My plecos don't eat plants, but they like hanging on them and snacking on algae. Should I worry?
 

Most reactions

Top