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How do I get rid of this Cyanobacteria?

KevinZ

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Hi!
First of all, you need to know from where that cyanobacteria came from
The most common one is High lvl of Organic Waste & Excess light.
Than you can take the next step.
1. Reduce the Nutrient on the Water.
2. Mechanically Remove the cyanobacteria (Start From Glass > Plant > Substrate > Vacuum Substrate )
3.Do Partial 20% Water change
4. Turn Off your Light for 1-2 Day if there are no any Fishes but if it's an established Tank Than Reduce Your Light per Day.
5. When you see the Cyanobacteria is reduced do 10% Water Change Every 2 day for 1 week
6. See the result

I am not the best at dealing with this kind of bacteria
Maybe Other Member will give you best option
Good luck and keep Smiling !:good::nod:
 
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wtusa17

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Hi!
First of all, you need to know from where that cyanobacteria came from
The most common one is High lvl of Organic Waste & Excess light.
Than you can take the next step.
1. Reduce the Nutrient on the Water.
2. Mechanically Remove the cyanobacteria (Start From Glass > Plant > Substrate > Vacuum Substrate )
3.Do Partial 20% Water change
4. Turn Off your Light for 1-2 Day if there are no any Fishes but if it's an established Tank Than Reduce Your Light per Day.
5. When you see the Cyanobacteria is reduced do 10% Water Change Every 2 day for 1 week
6. See the result

I am not the best at dealing with this kind of bacteria
Maybe Other Member will give you best option
Good luck and keep Smiling !:good::nod:
Thanks! So just a 20% everyday and removing it manually? Also it is fully stocked and is heavily planted and lights are on for 7 hours a day. What should I reduce it to?
 

Byron

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Cyanobacteria is caused by organics in the presence of light. I have battled it twice several years ago. First you need to reduce the organics because any attempt to remove it via blackouts, antibiotics, chemicals, etc, will be temporary and it will come back if the underlying cause is not resolved.

Causes of organics are fish and feeding, along with any dying organic matter (plant leaves, fish, etc.). Have a fish load that will be biologically in balance for the tank size, do regular (once weekly) partial water changes of 60-70%, vacuum the open areas of the substrate, keep the filter clean, and have the light/nutrients in balance for the plants.

Remove as much as possible at each water change; if you loosen the slime with your fingertips it will sink and be easier to vacuum out. Do as thorough a job as you can, and follow the above. It will likely take more than one or two cleanings, but it will deal with it provided the biological balance is stable.
 
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wtusa17

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Cyanobacteria is caused by organics in the presence of light. I have battled it twice several years ago. First you need to reduce the organics because any attempt to remove it via blackouts, antibiotics, chemicals, etc, will be temporary and it will come back if the underlying cause is not resolved.

Causes of organics are fish and feeding, along with any dying organic matter (plant leaves, fish, etc.). Have a fish load that will be biologically in balance for the tank size, do regular (once weekly) partial water changes of 60-70%, vacuum the open areas of the substrate, keep the filter clean, and have the light/nutrients in balance for the plants.
So just heavy cleanings?
 

KevinZ

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Thanks! So just a 20% everyday and removing it manually? Also it is fully stocked and is heavily planted and lights are on for 7 hours a day. What should I reduce it to?
Yes. And if your tank is heavy stocked you should try reduce it to 3-4 hour/day
But if you have some light coming to the tank (From Your Room light / Windows ) I said blackout for 1-2 day is the best. (No Direct Sunlight please )
 
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wtusa17

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Yes. And if your tank is heavy stocked you should try reduce it to 3-4 hour/day
But if you have some light coming to the tank (From Your Room light / Windows ) I said blackout for 1-2 day is the best. (No Direct Sunlight please )
It doesn’t get direct sunlight. So just reduce to 4 hours for how long?
 

Byron

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I have never recommended blackouts because this does not address the issue, namely the organics. I'll explain.

Cyanobacteria is photosynthetic, so it obviously requires light. Removing the light for any period will deprive it but the organics remain. Once the light is restored, back will come the cyanobacteria, assuming other changes have not occurred. The other blackout issue is that this will affect the plants. They may rebound after a few days, but I have never felt this justified because without dealing with the organics it is not going to solve the cyano problem.

Reducing the light intensity and/or duration is sometimes beneficial. I found in my case that the second time it came back, after I got rid of it I reduced the tank lighting by an hour and made sure no light was entering the room via windows especially in summer (this was a dedicate fish room to darkening windows was easy to manage). I also stopped the plant additives for a couple weeks. This has the effect of forcing the plants to use the naturally-occurring organics more than they might if additives are being dumped in. Once it seemd back in balance, I recommenced the plant supplements, though being careful to keep them minimal.
 
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wtusa17

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I have never recommended blackouts because this does not address the issue, namely the organics. I'll explain.

Cyanobacteria is photosynthetic, so it obviously requires light. Removing the light for any period will deprive it but the organics remain. Once the light is restored, back will come the cyanobacteria, assuming other changes have not occurred. The other blackout issue is that this will affect the plants. They may rebound after a few days, but I have never felt this justified because without dealing with the organics it is not going to solve the cyano problem.

Reducing the light intensity and/or duration is sometimes beneficial. I found in my case that the second time it came back, after I got rid of it I reduced the tank lighting by an hour and made sure no light was entering the room via windows especially in summer (this was a dedicate fish room to darkening windows was easy to manage). I also stopped the plant additives for a couple weeks. This has the effect of forcing the plants to use the naturally-occurring organics more than they might if additives are being dumped in. Once it seemd back in balance, I recommenced the plant supplements, though being careful to keep them minimal.
Ok so what should I do step by step to get rid of this stuff?
 

KevinZ

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It doesn’t get direct sunlight. So just reduce to 4 hours for how long?
Reduce it for 3 days. And see the result.
As @Byron mentioned you need to make sure to solve the primary causes of the cyanobacteria first otherwise the bacteria will take all over again.
 

KevinZ

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Ok. Do I need to do any wc?
Yes everytime you rub the cyanobacteria off do wc and vacuum it out from the substrate.
Do 20% or less don't do more than that. You don't want to make your established tank chemical keep changing too much
 
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wtusa17

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Yes everytime you rub the cyanobacteria off do wc and vacuum it out from the substrate.
Do 20% or less don't do more than that. You don't want to make your established tank chemical keep changing too much
And how often on the wc?
 

Byron

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Ok so what should I do step by step to get rid of this stuff?
I guess it wasn't clear earlier, so I'll point form it.

Remove as much as you can from surfaces with your fingertips.
Do a water change of 70-75%, vacuuming up the cyano and digging into the open areas of the substrate thoroughly.
Rinse the filter (the brown or black gunk is organics).
Your tank light is now on for 7 hours, you could reduce it by one hour but no more. I went from 8 down to 7, though I am not at all sure that really did much.
Do not add any plant fertilizer (liquid) for this week after the water change(s), nor next week if this is still appearing.
Feed the fish minimally, even going alternate days or only every three or four days. Any food in means organics out, you want to reduce the organics.

I stayed with once weekly water changes, and I think it was maybe four or five weeks before the cyano never reappeared; it was reappearing less and less every week. If it is multiplying rapidly, more fdrequent water changes doing the above will help.
 

KevinZ

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Here's the step

1. Find the primary cause's of the cyanobacteria and get rid of it
2.right after you do the first step then rub off the cyanobacteria do it from Glass > Plant > Substrate
3. After that vacuum out the cyanobacteria and do 20% water change.
4.Reduce the Light for 4 hours/day do it for 3 days
5.After 3 Day Check do 15-20% water change for every 2/3 day do it for 1 week.
6. See the result

If the cyanobacteria Coming back then you didn't solve the primary causes
If the cyanobacteria is reduced than rub it off and vacuum it out ( you don't have to do water change all over again bc the Primary problem are solved just make sure you remove all of the cyanobacteria on the tank until it's completely vanish )

How to prevent this is
Performing Regular Water Change
When water changes are not routinely performed, nitrate and phosphate will rise, which encourages algae and bacterial growth of all types
Avoid Overfeeding fish & Excess light

Still. I don't know the best way to Fight this kind of bacteria since I only help my friend with it. Never experience this kind of bacteria. They're not algae IMO
 
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