Honey gourami 26 gallon pond

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Sgooosh

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Hello! I have this half-barrel around 26 gallons I just set up for some fish.
- honey gourami *2
- medaka rice fish *6
- panda cory *6-10

It is just set up 2 days ago, and I added some plants from other ponds.
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DAY 2: I added a single plant(rotala?) from my other pond.

1691601857937.png

DAY 2: I added some more native plants which I do not know the name of, some emersed rotala, some bacopa, some dckweed, and some water lettuce. I doubt the duckweed will survive long.
 
Do honey gouramis need more shade or sun? I can add some other floaters to this pond if it needs a part with shade to breed in or something.

The temperature issues are all sorted out, In winter I will remove the fish that need warmer weather and sun, back into my holding tanks. Some will go into the main 75g if there's too many.
 
Do honey gouramis need more shade or sun? I can add some other floaters to this pond if it needs a part with shade to breed in or something.

The temperature issues are all sorted out, In winter I will remove the fish that need warmer weather and sun, back into my holding tanks. Some will go into the main 75g if there's too many.
They like shelter so more floaters would be better.
 
Gouramis need floating plants.

Water Hyacinth will probably grow too big for the pond. You want something with flatter leaves like water sprite or red root floaters.

I would not keep Medakas with gouramis because they both live near the surface. When the gouramis breed they will go after the Medakas.

A pr (1 male & 1 female) honey gourami would breed prolifically in that pond.
 
Gouramis need floating plants.

Water Hyacinth will probably grow too big for the pond. You want something with flatter leaves like water sprite or red root floaters.

I would not keep Medakas with gouramis because they both live near the surface. When the gouramis breed they will go after the Medakas.

A pr (1 male & 1 female) honey gourami would breed prolifically in that pond.
I see, Water hyacinth popped out of nowhere and it dies off in the winter, so it kind of dwarfed itself
does duckweed and water lettuce work to have the same effect as RRF?
and does anacharis have the same affect as Watersprite?
if not, I can get some wild plants from rivers and whatnot that are very similar. (frogbit, ludwigia, pennywort, parrot feather)

thanks. If the gouramis breed, will many of them still be able to live together?
If not, i will move it into smaller tanks.
I also only plan to keep the gourami population low, and move them/sell when there is too many. would this balance work for the rice fish?
 
Dwarf gouramis can live in groups until they mature and start setting up territories. Most people leave the babies with the adults until he (the dad) starts chasing the young males, then the babies get taken out and put in a separate tank to finish growing up.

Water lettuce would work with the gouramis but water sprite or red root floaters would be better for small gouramis.

Duckweed and anacharis won't work the same as water sprite.
 
Dwarf gouramis can live in groups until they mature and start setting up territories. Most people leave the babies with the adults until he (the dad) starts chasing the young males, then the babies get taken out and put in a separate tank to finish growing up.

Water lettuce would work with the gouramis but water sprite or red root floaters would be better for small gouramis.

Duckweed and anacharis won't work the same as water sprite.
Honey gouramis are pretty small.
 
Dwarf gouramis can live in groups until they mature and start setting up territories. Most people leave the babies with the adults until he (the dad) starts chasing the young males, then the babies get taken out and put in a separate tank to finish growing up.

Water lettuce would work with the gouramis but water sprite or red root floaters would be better for small gouramis.

Duckweed and anacharis won't work the same as water sprite.
thank you. if so, I will try and find red rooters. will they live under full blazing sun? also may i ask why water sprite would be different from the long stringy roots of other plants? is it beacuse it is leaves and not roots?
Honey gouramis are pretty small.
will the dad only chase the young males or the young female gouramis as well? I have another pond I can put them in, just wondering.

I just got some medakas. They are in quarantine since it's so hot out there.
 
Yes the floating plants will live under full sun. However, if they come from an aquarium and it's hot outside, they will need a few weeks or part shade during the middle of the day to adjust to the intense light and UV levels.

Water Sprite and red root floaters have flatter leaves and don't bulk up as much above the surface. This provides more shade with fewer roots and leaves.

Adult male gouramis normally chase the young males out of the territory and ignore the females, but will sometimes chase the females. The best thing to do is leave the babies with the father until he starts chasing them, then move all the young out and leave mum and dad in their pond to breed again.
 
Yes the floating plants will live under full sun. However, if they come from an aquarium and it's hot outside, they will need a few weeks or part shade during the middle of the day to adjust to the intense light and UV levels.

Water Sprite and red root floaters have flatter leaves and don't bulk up as much above the surface. This provides more shade with fewer roots and leaves.

Adult male gouramis normally chase the young males out of the territory and ignore the females, but will sometimes chase the females. The best thing to do is leave the babies with the father until he starts chasing them, then move all the young out and leave mum and dad in their pond to breed again.
Thanks, I will get some of them next time i see them at LFS.
I see, I see some articles saying that having multiple gouramis live together is ideal, but I believe it should just be one male and female?
 
It depends on the species but generally with gouramis it's one pair per tank unless the tank is big. Most small labyrinths have a territory that is about 2 feet square. Bigger gouramis need more space.
 
waterhyacinthphotos_1-1.jpg
they are really really bushy and dense roots,in the middle part where it all tangles together a fish could notswim through that
I know this is an old thread, but in my experience, I have never seen a fish more capable of jamming itself through roots and stems. They may look big broadside, but those little honeys are very thin and almost belligerent about going where it seems they couldn't. I regularly see them turning completely sideways and forcing themselves into every situation. Tight hair grass, dense stems, etc. -- "Challenge accepted!" seems to be the motto.

How is this project going if you are still following?
 

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