Hardwater stock semi finals

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AilyNC

AilyNC

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Have you done a re-test?
If you could reduce GH by putting something safe in the tank lots of people would be doing it and we would all love to know what it was (but speak to a patent lawyer before you go public ;))
Tested again this morning & same result. It's an odd one. GH 11dh (196.9ppm) in tank and 14dh (250.6ppm) from tap though water company says 17dh (307ppm).

Consistently actually my tap is 14dh/250.6ppm so that might change stock or at least make some more comfortable.

But again this tank hasn't has a large water change since water went in on 16th Sept.
 

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I've found a few sources saying that GH can be reduced by plants, peat, and driftwood [1] [2]. There are others, you can just search for them.

Plants uptake Ca and Mg as they grow, but it seems like they typically uptake a small amount (from source 1). However, source 1 continued to feed the tank food during their test. This probably introduced more calcium and magnesium to the tank. If your tank is planted, unstocked (and unfed), and you haven't made significant water changes on it since setting it up, it's possible the plants have been able to put a dent in the GH.

Peat and driftwood seem to do exactly what I suggested earlier (source 1 and 2 mention this). In the process of releasing tannins, peat and driftwood pull Ca and Mg ions out of the solution. This basically works the same as your standard water softener except water softeners replace the Mg and Ca with Na while peat and driftwood replace Mg and Ca with organic compound ions. Again, it seems like it typically can't cause massive change in hardness, but it sounds like it has more of an effect than just plants. Interestingly, it sounds like peat and driftwood don't reduce the total dissolved solids (TDS) because they're replacing one type of ion with a different type. GH tests only test for Mg2+ and Ca2+ and thus, they can't measure the organic ions released by the peat and wood.

The wood in the tank in combination with live plants, the lack of fish food being added (I'm assuming), and small water changes could be responsible for the discrepancy in hardness between tap and tank. Once you add fish, start doing larger water changes, and start feeding more I would expect the tank hardness to revert back to the tap hardness.
 
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AilyNC

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I've found a few sources saying that GH can be reduced by plants, peat, and driftwood [1] [2]. There are others, you can just search for them.

Plants uptake Ca and Mg as they grow, but it seems like they typically uptake a small amount (from source 1). However, source 1 continued to feed the tank food during their test. This probably introduced more calcium and magnesium to the tank. If your tank is planted, unstocked (and unfed), and you haven't made significant water changes on it since setting it up, it's possible the plants have been able to put a dent in the GH.

Peat and driftwood seem to do exactly what I suggested earlier (source 1 and 2 mention this). In the process of releasing tannins, peat and driftwood pull Ca and Mg ions out of the solution. This basically works the same as your standard water softener except water softeners replace the Mg and Ca with Na while peat and driftwood replace Mg and Ca with organic compound ions. Again, it seems like it typically can't cause massive change in hardness, but it sounds like it has more of an effect than just plants. Interestingly, it sounds like peat and driftwood don't reduce the total dissolved solids (TDS) because they're replacing one type of ion with a different type. GH tests only test for Mg2+ and Ca2+ and thus, they can't measure the organic ions released by the peat and wood.

The wood in the tank in combination with live plants, the lack of fish food being added (I'm assuming), and small water changes could be responsible for the discrepancy in hardness between tap and tank. Once you add fish, start doing larger water changes, and start feeding more I would expect the tank hardness to revert back to the tap hardness.
Thank you. I'll have a read of these once I get the little one to sleep but what you've said is very clear to follow. I'll stop according to tap water readings of GH 14 and follow advice you e given when adding fish.
 
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AilyNC

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I've a question about this guy it's says captive breed are suited to general community tank. Hardness of 268ppm. I've been going by the water company report of 307ppm but my tap consistently tests at 250.6ppm. I kinda just assumed water company was more accurate but maybe I should be following the tap api test result.

Anyway is captive bred a suitable pair to add or a terrible idea?

 

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I would definitely go off your tap water rather than your local authority - what’s coming out your taps is what the fish will live in and that difference of 50ish ppm will make a big difference to what you choose. We usually ask for local authority water as most people don’t have their own test kits.

Dwarf cichlids are totally doable in this tank but it would need to be planned around them rather than adding to other plans. Laetacara Dorsigera might be worth a look too I believe they are quite flexible with water ranges.
 

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You mentioned getting other rainbows...If you are looking to get other small Rainbows my LFS informed me that the Pseudomugil signifers are more aggressive than my furcatus. (Your mohawks) Not sure about the Pseudomugil gertrudae as far as temperament, maybe ask someone or check out the Rainbow book.

I also thought Cherry barbs were terrors but maybe misinformed.

I think you know my personal favorite ♡
 

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I've a question about this guy it's says captive breed are suited to general community tank. Hardness of 268ppm. I've been going by the water company report of 307ppm but my tap consistently tests at 250.6ppm. I kinda just assumed water company was more accurate but maybe I should be following the tap api test result.

Anyway is captive bred a suitable pair to add or a terrible idea?

Your GH is way too high for any Apistogramma species, regardless of if they are captive bred or not. The wild ones need a GH under 100ppm and captive bred under 200 and preferably under 150ppm.
 
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AilyNC

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I'll forget the apistogramma. And stick to what has been guilding me with this tank - a chill community of small fish around the Forktail blue-eyed Rainbowfish & a fun Bristlenose.

All the fish I had been looking at are ok in tap water GH 14dh or 250.6ppm.

@vanalisa I'm only basing behaviour and compatibility from seriouslyfish which put Cherry Barbs as peaceful community fish. I think @NCaquatics had some so maybe she can advise me.
 

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Cherry barbs would be great. Keep 1 male and 5 females, it should stay very peaceful. Mine are pansies lol I love them
 

vanalisa

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I'll forget the apistogramma. And stick to what has been guilding me with this tank - a chill community of small fish around the Forktail blue-eyed Rainbowfish & a fun Bristlenose.

All the fish I had been looking at are ok in tap water GH 14dh or 250.6ppm.

@vanalisa I'm only basing behaviour and compatibility from seriouslyfish which put Cherry Barbs as peaceful community fish. I think @NCaquatics had some so maybe she can advise me.
It seems someone on here has some type of barbs that are aggressive. I'm clueless and am feeling overprotective of your fish :rofl:
Anyway you've sure done your homework; it will be an amazing tank ♡
 
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It seems someone on here has some type of barbs that are aggressive. I'm clueless and am feeling overprotective of your fish :rofl:
Anyway you've sure done your homework; it will be an amazing tank ♡
I'm really looking forward to a small community tank with colourful lil ones :wub:
 
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