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Fluvial Edge 46L Costs

Discussion in 'Saltwater Hardware' started by Nstocks, Aug 2, 2014.

  1. Nstocks

    Nstocks Mostly New Member

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    Hello,
     
    I'm looking at getting back into fish keeping, having has a 100L tropical tank as a teenager.
     
    I was originally looking at biOrb Life 15L for just shrimp but I'm not so sure yet due to having to replace the filter to make it a better environment.
     
    I'm now looking at a Fluvial Edge 46L marine setup. I'm making this thread to ask if someone would be kind enough to provide an estimated cost breakdown before I look into it further myself. So a list of things like live rock, sand, heater, powerhead, additional filtration, additional lighting plus recommended fish for this tank. (like two clownfish a shrimp and a few small corals). Plus the tank itself which is around £150. 
     
    I'm sure someone with experience in marine fish keeping can estimate these costs and viability far quicker than I can! (I'v estimated £250 before fish). Also weekly costs (not electricity) associated with a small tank.
     
    I would highly appreciate help with this.
     
    Thanks
    (P.S if anyone has a journal of a fluvial edge marine, let me know I'd be interested in reading it)
     
    EDIT: Can anyone clarify the need for lighting 24/... This tank will be in my bedroom so if lighting is essential all the time, I won't be buying one! Also, are Fluvial tanks noisy?
     
    I found this post on a different forum. It looks like the 23L. Isn't this too small for marine? http://www.ultimatereef.net/forums/showthread.php?t=491733
     
  2. evan47

    evan47 Mostly New Member

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    personally i would go for a 45liter 60x30x30 bowfront for a nano marine or freshwater tank.
    trendy tanks like the edge and biorbs all seem to have significant drawbacks.
     
  3. Donya

    Donya Crazy Crab Lady
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    Have a look at these if you haven't already:
    Marine FAQ: http://www.fishforums.net/index.php?/topic/410541-marine-aquarium-faq/
    Marine equipment: http://www.fishforums.net/index.php?/topic/421015-common-marine-tank-equipment/
     
    Costs are actually rather hard for other people to estimate for you in an accurate way. Your best bet is to research what you want, shop around for prices, and do your own estimations. For weekly costs, you will be looking at food and salt mainly, as well as RO water for top-ups and mixing new water if you buy it rather than make your own. Smaller marine tanks usually get a ~20% water change weekly.
     
    Edges don't have much surface area when filled as intended, which is rather risky for a marine tank, particularly when you're new to marine. A lack of surface agitation is a common contributing factor to many marine tank crashes due to lack of O2 when something dies in the tank, even something small. As evan47 said, you would be better off with a more traditionally shaped tank that allows more surface area for gas exchange as a first marine tank. You'd also be better starting with a larger tank if you can afford it. Although initially cheaper, small tanks can go sour very quickly if you're not careful. If you want a clown pair, a 75L tank would be a lot better. 
     
     
     
     
    Marine tanks often have blue moonlights, but it's not a basic requirement, and the moonlights can be pretty dim too even if you do have them. Some fixtures though are built with the idea of a blue glow to the tank at night though and don't necessarily have a way to turn that off. Also, if the room doesn't get any natural light in the mornings, it can be a bit of a shock for animals if the lights come on all at once.
     
     
     
    EDIT: missed this, sorry.
     
     
    Tiny marine tanks are done all the time, but they are quite difficult and many fail after a short period of time. 
     
  4. Nstocks

    Nstocks Mostly New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I'm going to a LFS later today to see what they sell and if I'm still interested when I see the livestock!
     
    I hear what you are saying about these type of tanks and I'm going to look into it properly before making decisions. (cost is the main factor)
     
    This is very nice but it's quite expensive really. I'm not so sure about having the water complexity open like this either... Noise is a main reason since it's in my bedroom. I'm guessing that I could probably make a similar tank for cheaper anyway. Perhaps a sump with all the equipment in a cupboard (except for the powerhead of course) will make it less noisy.
     
    http://www.seapets.co.uk/products/aquarium-supplies/aquariums/fluval/fluval-reef-aquariums/fluval-marine-aquarium-and-cabinet-m40-54-litre.html?utm_source=googlebase&utm_medium=feedmanager&gclid=Cj0KEQjwu_eeBRCL3_zm8aOtvvkBEiQApfIbGAbvixcp2Z74BabGb2QFwVLeNMOl8vTPHtDkEa2Rr7oaAol68P8HAQ
     
  5. Nstocks

    Nstocks Mostly New Member

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    A trip to my LFS really opened my eyes to the size and types of tanks I should be looking at, especially for marine. The Fluvial edge is definitely out of the question - far too small. I was somewhat surprised that the livestock is slightly cheaper online too.
     
    The Fluvial M40 is nice (glass joints are quite clear and cabinet is well made) but even seems a little small and there's no way to hide the cables. Although I do like the idea of buying a kit, I think I will  look into making it myself to try and save some money and get exactly what I want. If anyone know of a great 100L or less Marine DIY project with no visible equipment or cables, let me know!
     
    Can't wait to get started [​IMG]
     
  6. Donya

    Donya Crazy Crab Lady
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    If you have a good, trustworthy LFS with healthy stock, I would strongly recommend getting livestock locally even if it's slightly more expensive, at least as you're starting out. Seeing before buying is pretty important; marine animals are quite fragile and shipping adds another stress variable to things in addition to usually being a blind purchase. Shipping is also usually pretty pricey for marine animals since it has to be fast (should be overnight), and bulk buying that would minimize the added cost are a bad idea for a new tank, since it will cause unnecessary attrition in CUC inverts and can overload the filtration if too many fish go in at once. On the other hand, if the the stores near you have tanks that are full of ich and other diseases, then online may be a better bet.
     

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