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Drape fin barbs and Odessa barbs

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CockroachTheory

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I am hoping to add these 2 to a 75 gallon, with a group of Pearl gourami as the centerpiece.

I was wondering if groups of 3 males and 5 females would work well and if they would would be peaceful towards one another.

I plan to have dense plantings and driftwood, as well as few species of nano rasboras to dither about.

Thank you for your advice!
 
You asked this in another thread, to which I just responded. Might be best to stay in one thread, so we can better follow and advise.

The Odessa Barb is too active to match gourami. The other is a different story, assuming it is the species Oreichthys crenuchoides. Data here is why I think this.

 
Thank you for your input and the link.
I didn’t notice the various groupings of sub forums when I first posted and figured it was best to post about the individual fish, in their respective groups and realized I couldn’t delete the original thread.
 
You asked this in another thread, to which I just responded. Might be best to stay in one thread, so we can better follow and advise.

The Odessa Barb is too active to match gourami. The other is a different story, assuming it is the species Oreichthys crenuchoides. Data here is why I think this.

I keep reading conflicting accounts about the Odessa. Now, after reading your linked article, I wonder if they may be too much for the drape fin barbs.

I have no experience with barbs outside of cherry, rosy, and tigers.
Most sources are indicating more fish makes for less aggression. I could eliminate the drape fin barbs and increase the number of Odessa barbs, but if they will be in conflict with pearl gouramis, they won’t do.

I assumed the gourami would be more at the top and barbs were more bottom-midwater and would not be in conflict. Seems only consistently peaceful cohabitations is in schools of 6 or more.
 
Odessa barbs are extremely active and can be rowdy. It won’t make a difference if you keep them in larger numbers. Snakeskin or six- banded barbs would be better companions for pearl gouramis.
 
Odessa barbs are extremely active and can be rowdy. It won’t make a difference if you keep them in larger numbers. Snakeskin or six- banded barbs would be better companions for pearl gouramis.
Thank you for that! I do like the 6 banded barbs. I’d replace both barbs with a rainbow shark, if he wouldn’t brutalize glass cats. Thankfully, the tank is still empty and I’m waiting on substrate and hardscape to arrive, then I’ll have to save for the massive plant order. I have some time to rethink these barbs, since I’ve prioritized the gouramis.
 
I keep reading conflicting accounts about the Odessa. Now, after reading your linked article, I wonder if they may be too much for the drape fin barbs.

I have no experience with barbs outside of cherry, rosy, and tigers.
Most sources are indicating more fish makes for less aggression. I could eliminate the drape fin barbs and increase the number of Odessa barbs, but if they will be in conflict with pearl gouramis, they won’t do.

I assumed the gourami would be more at the top and barbs were more bottom-midwater and would not be in conflict. Seems only consistently peaceful cohabitations is in schools of 6 or more.

There are several types of aggression, or perhaps better said as several things that cause different aggression. The natural aggression of male gourami to defend their territory is one, and the level of aggression a gourami enacts depends upon the species, and also the individual. Then there is the resulting aggression when a shoaling species does not have a decent sized group. These are not the same thing. The space (tank size) can cause aggression too. As can having the wrong tankmates.

Aggression is a feature that fish use a lot when forced into such situations, frankly because they have no other real option. They are not in the environment they expect, and in frustration they lash out. One of our members posted a thread a couple months back that was relevant here...the vast majority of "bullying" in a fish is directly due to the aquarist not providing something the fish needs and expects. Fish per say are not bullies, it is the fault of the aquarist for not researching and understanding and providing the environment a fish requires. These needs are part of the genetic makeup of each species. Fish do not learn them, they are born with them.
 
I’ve decided to reduce the 75 stock list and remove both Odessa and Drape fin barbs from the final plan. I have decided to replace them with a group of 10 Pentazona barbs. These will fit better with the gouramis and overall aesthetic I have in mind.

With the chili barbs, green kuboti, and blue axelrodi, there will be plenty of activity and color.
 
There are several types of aggression, or perhaps better said as several things that cause different aggression. The natural aggression of male gourami to defend their territory is one, and the level of aggression a gourami enacts depends upon the species, and also the individual. Then there is the resulting aggression when a shoaling species does not have a decent sized group. These are not the same thing. The space (tank size) can cause aggression too. As can having the wrong tankmates.

Aggression is a feature that fish use a lot when forced into such situations, frankly because they have no other real option. They are not in the environment they expect, and in frustration they lash out. One of our members posted a thread a couple months back that was relevant here...the vast majority of "bullying" in a fish is directly due to the aquarist not providing something the fish needs and expects. Fish per se are not bullies, it is the fault of the aquarist for not researching and understanding and providing the environment a fish requires. These needs are part of the genetic makeup of each species. Fish do not learn them, they are born with them.
Totally agreed. That’s why it’s important to not take care sheets and general online information as gospel and seek out people with direct experience. That’s also why I posted about the fish in multiple places, since gourami may exhibit different types of aggression than barbs and in different scenarios.
I always like to make list and research each species. I sketch out my aquascapes and list how many of each plants I need. I literally go off my written notebook until I finalize everything from the equipment and substrate, to the plants and fish.
I sort of enjoy that part of the process as much as keeping the fish. Sometimes, I find myself deeper than I mean to go into my research and overthink things, but so far, I’ve generally had successful setups.
 

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