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Dead guppies

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by Sam ary, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. Sam ary

    Sam ary New Member

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    I need quick advice, the last 2 days I've woken up to a dead fish and my largest adult female is all beat up and bloody looking, I dont keep males in the tank but I recently added snails a few day's ago! Could it be something from them? This is the best I could do for a photo but the big red tailed female doesn't usually have all the red all up her body, that's actually bloody and sore looking tissue all the way up to her gills! What should I do for her? 20191009_084406.jpg
     
  2. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Wipe the inside of the glass down with a clean fish sponge.

    Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate. Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

    Clean the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. However, do not clean it if the filter is less than 6 weeks old. Wash filter media in a bucket of tank water and re-use it.

    Add a heap of salt.
    You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 2 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water.

    If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres.

    Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

    The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate will affect some plants. The lower dose rate will not affect plants.

    After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

    If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

    ---------------------------
    Post a better picture of the fish.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. Sam ary

    Sam ary New Member

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    I have a pleco an algae eater 2 shrimp and 2 asian gold clams in my tank as well with all live plants. My tank is well established and the only thing I did was add snails? Will the salt be ok for everyone?
     
  4. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    If you use the lower dose rate (2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) it will be safe for the other fish and invertebrates you have in the tank.
     
  5. Sam ary

    Sam ary New Member

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    Did I do the math right on that? For a 29 gallon tank it would be about 6.5 tablespoons? That seems like alot of salt?
     
  6. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    To work out the volume of water in the tank:
    measure length x width x height in cm.
    divide by 1000.
    = volume in litres.

    When you measure the height, measure from the top of the substrate to the top of the water level.

    There is a calculator/ converter in the "How To Tips" at the top of this page that will let you convert litres to gallons if you need it.
     
  7. WinterSoldier.

    WinterSoldier. Fish Fanatic

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    I would recommend a water change
     
  8. Sam ary

    Sam ary New Member

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    One of the guppies has an irregular eye now with what looks like a line of blood at the bottom. Is this a parasite problem thats killing my fish rapidly? Is API general cure safe for everything in my tank? What should I do ?
     
  9. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
    Staff Member Moderator Global Moderator Tank of the Month Winner!

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    No offense but that water looks really dirty. What are your water parameters? Red gills could be ammonia poisoning. Aquarium salt is usually 1 tablespoon per 5 gallons. I would do 1 teaspoon myself with a pleco and shrimp in there. Do a 75% water change daily for 2 weeks. If you take 75% water out then add 3/4 tsp per gallon of aquarium salt back in each day. Be sure to dissolve the salt before adding to tank or it will burn the fish. Please let us know your parameters ASAP.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    It's a bacterial infection. Salt should deal with it in most cases but sometimes you need to use a medication.

    API General Cure won't do anything to help this.

    Try a broad spectrum fish medication or an anti-biotic.
     

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