Catfish slamming face into gravel

Daviem

New Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
Uk
Hi, my catfish has started slamming his head into the gravel every now and then and then sometimes jumps upwards when swimming, could he be trying to find food using his barbels when he hits the gravel?, im not sure why he jumps upwards randomly though.
 

Meg0000

Fishaholic
Joined
Jan 30, 2020
Messages
521
Reaction score
198
Location
Canada
Hi, my catfish has started slamming his head into the gravel every now and then and then sometimes jumps upwards when swimming, could he be trying to find food using his barbels when he hits the gravel?, im not sure why he jumps upwards randomly though.
My corys do that sometimes too in the sand, I hope it is normal
 

essjay

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Global Moderator
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
Messages
7,166
Reaction score
2,776
Location
Teesside, UK
I moved the thread, then thought to check and the OP has columbian sharks - so I moved the thread back to the brackish forum :blush:
 
OP
Daviem

Daviem

New Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
Uk
I will try and get some tomorrow, they are so scared they scurry away each time I go near them, but I noticed this odd behaviour last night from a distance, I do have an issue at the moment my reverse osmosis kit was faulty so Im waiting for a new one so there hasn't been a water change in a while, the nitrites, nitrates and ammonia are still at 0 though, but just to be on the safe side I added seachem prime I think it calmed them a bit, also they were both the same size when I got them but one has grown the one acting strange hasn't. I will though try and get a video of whats happening but its hard as I have to be near them and they just swim all over the place when I go near them. I had to put a towel over half the aquarium to calm them down. They seem more stressed now then when I got them.
 
OP
Daviem

Daviem

New Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
Uk
Ok, I haven't had a chance to get a video/photo yet but today I think I figured out whats going on, one of the sharks is chasing and trying to nip the other shark, is there anything I can do to stop this, someone said get another 1 but I dont see how this could help if two turn one 1? they used to stay together all the time but for the past 5 days one tries to stay away from the other one the same one that jumps. As for the head slamming I actually think theyre looking for food in the gravel because when I fed them they both did that today.
 

Byron

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
13,291
Reaction score
4,233
Location
CA
Ok, I haven't had a chance to get a video/photo yet but today I think I figured out whats going on, one of the sharks is chasing and trying to nip the other shark, is there anything I can do to stop this, someone said get another 1 but I dont see how this could help if two turn one 1? they used to stay together all the time but for the past 5 days one tries to stay away from the other one the same one that jumps. As for the head slamming I actually think theyre looking for food in the gravel because when I fed them they both did that today.
We don't have much info here, and we are assuming the "catfish" to be the species Ariopsis seemanni (common name Colombian Shark). We also don't know your level of knowledge on this fish, it is worth mentioning that it gets 30-35cm (12-14 inches) and needs a tank no smaller than 240 cm (8 feet) by 60 cm (2 feet) dimensions. It is probably best alone, or in a small group. Two fish may see each other as rivals or invades of territory. This can easily account for the behaviour. More info here:

 
OP
Daviem

Daviem

New Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
Uk
We don't have much info here, and we are assuming the "catfish" to be the species Ariopsis seemanni (common name Colombian Shark). We also don't know your level of knowledge on this fish, it is worth mentioning that it gets 30-35cm (12-14 inches) and needs a tank no smaller than 240 cm (8 feet) by 60 cm (2 feet) dimensions. It is probably best alone, or in a small group. Two fish may see each other as rivals or invades of territory. This can easily account for the behaviour. More info here:

Yes theyre columbian sharks, well I have a lot of conflicting knowledge on them as everywhere online the literature states different figures for them, ph, gh, salinity, Im fully aware of their potential size and the aquarium for them is large enough for when theyre adults! so that certainly isnt a issue, one keeps going to the other one then gets chased and sometimes stays away and the other one swims towards the fish and chases again, could a different set of smaller fish being added who are not small enough to be eaten help the situation as I dont want to get a 3rd shark. I do believe a 3rd could make the situation better or worse and I dont want to risk the latter.
 

Byron

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
13,291
Reaction score
4,233
Location
CA
Yes theyre columbian sharks, well I have a lot of conflicting knowledge on them as everywhere online the literature states different figures for them, ph, gh, salinity, Im fully aware of their potential size and the aquarium for them is large enough for when theyre adults! so that certainly isnt a issue, one keeps going to the other one then gets chased and sometimes stays away and the other one swims towards the fish and chases again, could a different set of smaller fish being added who are not small enough to be eaten help the situation as I dont want to get a 3rd shark. I do believe a 3rd could make the situation better or worse and I dont want to risk the latter.
If this is interactive aggression--which can be any level from mild chasing (appearing more like "play") to intense physical attacks--it is a common result of stress. Many things cause stress, and one of these is having too few in a group if the species is inherently shoaling. From the data in the link I gave previously, it would seem possible this is the issue. However, adding more might not solve the problem even if you could do this; once a fish is "pushed" into such a situation, it tends to be permanent and seldom reversible. I do not know enough about this particular species to offer more than this generic comment. Separating the two individuals is really the only option, if your observation confirms this as the likely issue.
 

trending

Staff online

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top