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Brown Algae On Drift Wood

Discussion in 'Algae Removal' started by Trinotet, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. Trinotet

    Trinotet New Member

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    Hello
    I'm a newbie on fish keeping, started my first fish tank 2 month ago, a Fluval Edge 23L, not easy to care but a very good looking [​IMG]
    Done fishless cycle and at the moment i've got two drift woods, two rocks, one anubis nana, one other low tech plant and some java moss.
    Since the beggining one of the drift woods is getting some brown algae, i bought an otto to se if he would like it but no luck, the fish tank is to small for a pleco. I'm now thinking about a snail or shrimps to take care of it.

    But first I would like your help to ID this algae and maybe tell me why does it not stop growing.
    Pictures following
     
    Many thanks
    samuel franco
     

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  2. gmc1

    gmc1 Member

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    The fungus will eventually go on its own.when this happens to me I scrub the wood in tank water on water change day.you can leave it but it may get unsightly.
    Your tank looks good.i had the larger Fluval edge and yes it was awkward to do maintenance on.
     
  3. Trinotet

    Trinotet New Member

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    Oh thanks for the help, so it's no algae...
    It there any thing i can do to slow it down or just keep on scrubbing it?
    Is there any fish, snail ou shrimp it may help get it away?
     
    many thanks
     
  4. gmc1

    gmc1 Member

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    I would just keep scrubbing.many people leave it but I chose not to.it will eventually subside.i am sure there is nothing that could keep up eating it all.i had a piece of redmoor that kept growing fungus on it for 4 weeks.that was with scrubbing twice a week.that was a new tank also.
     
  5. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I can't be absolutely certain from the photo, but the "fuzz" to the back appears to me to likely be brush algae.  The "fuzz" closer to the front does have the appearance of fungus, but again the photo may be doing this.
     
    If any of this is white, then it is fungus.  But if it is grey, brown/black, very dark green, and definitely not white, then it is probably brush algae.  As you refer to it as "brown," I am more inclined to think it is brush algae.  If you could take a much closer photo of just the portion of the wood with this fuzz, I might be able to be more certain.
     
    I will for the moment assume it is brush algae, and offer some suggestions.  First thing to keep in mind is that algae is natural and normal in a healthy aquarium.  When nutrients are available (and even without fish, you have nutrients, such as organics in the tap water, ammonia added in cycling, etc) in the presence of light, algae will quickly appear.  There are many different species of algae, but brush algae is especially common in aquaria.
     
    Algae is also especially prevalent in new tanks where the biological system is still developing.  Cycling is one aspect, but even after that, you still have a period of time (a few weeks to a few months) when the biological system will settle as fish are added, fed, plants added/fed, etc.  When live plants are present, the aim is to provide sufficient light and nutrients for the plants but not additional (of either) to encourage or promote excess algae.  Sometimes it takes a while to work out this balance.
     
    This type of algae is not palatable to any but one or two fish species, and as both would be much too large for your tank, and need to be kept in groups as well, I will not say more.  So algae control is in your hands.  I would suggest curtailing the light duration; I don't know what it is now, but keeping it regular each day by use of a simple timer is a good idea, so then you have a set period of hours of light at the same time every 24-hour period, which is not only good for plants but essential for fish too.  And then I would say no more than 8 hours to start.  Once the plants are growing, and fish are added and being fed, you might be able to extend this, or may have to reduce it.
     
    Byron.
     

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