Best website for accurate information on everything fish?

JennySolano

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Experience means nothing really. Because at the end of the day people find the answers, they want to hear off one of the dozens of websites on the nett. So just go hunting if you know the answer you want you will find it.
Like what the great songwriter said: A man hears what he wants to and disregards the rest.

But not us women. We’re analytical. 😛
 

itiwhetu

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Like what the great songwriter said: A man hears what he wants to and disregards the rest.

But not us women. We’re analytical. 😛

Like what the great songwriter said: A man hears what he wants to and disregards the rest.

But not us women. We’re analytical. 😛
A man's ego is easily bruised so he will fight till his last breath to prove he is right
 

WhistlingBadger

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I am very surprised that the members here give "Seriously Fish" any mention. The information seems to be so broad it is useless for example I looked up Pearl Gourami pH 5.5-8 and Neon Tetra 4.5-7.5. If you look at Dr. Axelrod he will give information like Pearl Gourami 7 pH Neon Tetra 6.8. I would argue that " Seriously Fish " is just telling people that any fish can live in any tank, which I find incredible.
Both of those are very adaptable, long-captive fish. I think you're drawing conclusions based on a very limited sample.
 

Colin_T

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So there is now no problem keeping neons with livebearers or rainbows because they have now been adapted for those tanks
There is a problem doing that in my book. People should try to keep soft water fishes in soft water, and hard water fishes in hard water. We don't keep marine fishes in freshwater (and vice versa), so why mess about with freshwater fishes and their preferred pH & GH?
 

itiwhetu

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So I'm new to the fish world just been onto "Seriously Fish"

Neon Tetra pH 4-7.5 hardness 18-215
Australian Rainbow Ph 6.5-8 hardness 142-356
Swordtail Ph 7-8 hardness 179-447

I buy these fish off the recommendation of the site that this forum site says is great. See a problem with that or not.
 

Colin_T

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Australian Rainbow Ph 6.5-8 hardness 142-356
It depends on which species of rainbowfish. Some come from very soft acid water (Iriatherina werneri and Rhadinocentrus ornatus) and other come from hard water with a high pH. Some are also found in brackish estuaries and in the ocean (Pseudomugil cyanodorsalis and signifer). P. signifer can also be found in upper reaches of rivers with soft water and no salt.

Unfortunately most Australian rainbowfish sold in Europe and the US are called Australian rainbows and could be anything out of the 80+ species of rainbowfish. This is where scientific names come in. Then we can say this particular species is naturally found in these conditions. But again the conditions can change throughout the year and the pH might go up in the wet season and down in the dry season, depending on if we are talking about a pond, lake, creek or permanently flowing river.
 

itiwhetu

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It depends on which species of rainbowfish. Some come from very soft acid water (Iriatherina werneri and Rhadinocentrus ornatus) and other come from hard water with a high pH. Some are also found in brackish estuaries and in the ocean (Pseudomugil cyanodorsalis and signifer). P. signifer can also be found in upper reaches of rivers with soft water and no salt.

Unfortunately most Australian rainbowfish sold in Europe and the US are called Australian rainbows and could be anything out of the 80+ species of rainbowfish. This is where scientific names come in. Then we can say this particular species is naturally found in these conditions. But again the conditions can change throughout the year and the pH might go up in the wet season and down in the dry season, depending on if we are talking about a pond, lake, creek or permanently flowing river.
I just wrote Australian rainbow into "Seriously Fish" just like any person new to the hobby would and that is what I got.
 

Byron

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I just wrote Australian rainbow into "Seriously Fish" just like any person new to the hobby would and that is what I got.

This is why we keep advising the use of scientific names. "Australian Rainbowfish" happens to be a common name used in some areas for the species Melanotaenia fluviatilis, and there apparently are other common names in use for this species, Murray River Rainbowfish and Crimson-spotted Rainbowfish. Entering "Australian Rainbowfish" when you are really wanting to see all species in this family is not going to get you anywhere, any more than entering something as broad as "South American Tetras" and expecting to actually come up with data on species "x".
 

itiwhetu

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This is why we keep advising the use of scientific names. "Australian Rainbowfish" happens to be a common name used in some areas for the species Melanotaenia fluviatilis, and there apparently are other common names in use for this species, Murray River Rainbowfish and Crimson-spotted Rainbowfish. Entering "Australian Rainbowfish" when you are really wanting to see all species in this family is not going to get you anywhere, any more than entering something as broad as "South American Tetras" and expecting to actually come up with data on species "x".
The difference being there is a fish called The Australian Rainbow, but as far as I know there isn't a fish called The South American Tetra
 

Byron

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So there is now no problem keeping neons with livebearers or rainbows because they have now been adapted for those tanks

When you pull snippets of sentences out of context you can distort things to have almost any meaning. Some of the species profiles on SF covering "x" species that have been commercially bred for decades mention in the water parameter section or maintenance that while the fish will live in "x" parameters they will have more colour or better health or be more likely to spawn or whatever in softer water. The degree to which a species actually can adapt to differing parameters is a very complex subject, and is not likely to be even remotely understood by many in the hobby. There are certain species which do show a remarkable wide tolerance and maintain good health regardless, but there are other species that certainly do not. It is not really surprising, or should not be to anyone with some knowledge of biology, why some species are so tolerable, but that is another huge topic.

No one to my knowledge has ever satisfactorily provided evidence of soft and very soft water species living better or even as well in hard water than soft water, and no one has found evidence of hard water species thriving equally or better in soft water. There is evidence that fish from soft waters will live well and thrive in such water, regardless of commercial breeding, and there is plenty of evidence that hard water species will only really live well in such water.

This is a scientific hobby, like it or not. We expect to maintain living creatures in an artificial enclosed tank of water. We must understand and accept that regardless, the laws of the natural world respecting chemistry, biology, microbiology, etc will apply to what goes in and occurs within that confined space. There is plenty of proof that the fish will be more likely of having a good life if we provide what they "expect" from their respective environment. That does not mean they may not be as healthy outside that specific environment--they may or may not, depending upon the species, individual fish, and the conditions that are involved. I am certainly not qualified to be absolute, but I accept the knowledge-based advice of those who are, the ichthyologists, biologists, microbiologists that have spent years learning the science.
 
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