B. imbellus

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WhistlingBadger

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I was under the impression that chocolate and samurai gourami were different names for the same critter. Now I know that is not the case. I have soft water, but again, SF recommends keeping samurai in groups of at least six too, and since this is going to be a small tank, I don't think that's a good idea. They're just a little big for what I want to do.
 

HoldenOn

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That would be great, don't want to get into trouble, but I have found that peat on the base, gravel over it works great, I love under gravel filtration for this type of set up as you get no dead spots that can give you anaerobic bacteria.
I have heard mixed things about under gravel filtration. Is it reliable? I hear stories of clogging pretty often.
 
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WhistlingBadger

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I'm not a huge fan of under-gravel filtration, but it can work. I don't recommend it for planted tanks, but again, some people make it work. The science of it makes sense, but I am always trying to replicate a natural environment as closely as possible, and there just aren't too many natural situations in which water is actively pumped down into the substrate. It seems like UGFs require a lot of maintenance to make them work right, too. Constant gravel vacuuming.

I'm a firm believer in soil-under-sand substrates with lots of plants, and those anaerobic zones aren't necessarily a bad thing in such tanks. Some would even say they're necessary. I leave these tanks set up for multiple years before I have to rebuild or otherwise change out the substrate. Obviously, undergravel filtration and its attendant vacuuming wouldn't work for such a tank. Not saying it can't work; it just doesn't work for me.
 

HoldenOn

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I'm not a huge fan of under-gravel filtration, but it can work. I don't recommend it for planted tanks, but again, some people make it work. The science of it makes sense, but I am always trying to replicate a natural environment as closely as possible, and there just aren't too many natural situations in which water is actively pumped down into the substrate. It seems like UGFs require a lot of maintenance to make them work right, too. Constant gravel vacuuming.

I'm a firm believer in soil-under-sand substrates with lots of plants, and those anaerobic zones aren't necessarily a bad thing in such tanks. Some would even say they're necessary. Obviously, undergravel filtration and its attendant vacuuming wouldn't work for such a tank. Not saying it can't work; it just doesn't work for me.
Do you use soil from, say, your backyard, or like nutrient infused stuff from fluval?
 
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WhistlingBadger

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Just plain old dirt works, but since mine is solid clay, I usually buy some Miracle Grow Organic. Don't use artificially fertilized soil.

Find the book "Ecology of the Planted Aquarium" by Diane Walstad. It will show you The Way of Dirt Tanks.

 

goldfish_is_orange

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It's true that Betta Imbellis are the "peaceful bettas", but here in South East Asia the opinions are mixed. Some think they have been bred to become aggressive (I don't even know how that works). The keepers I asked said that they're usually peaceful when given more space. That makes me think that the "aggression" is most likely just fish being territorial.
That said, I hope you go with the imbellis. It would be nice to see how your tank would turn out.
 
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WhistlingBadger

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Still wavering between imbellis, licorice gourami, or sparkling gourami. All have their pros and cons, but I have a while to decide. (We close on a new house in a month, then there's the adventure of moving, then there's building and cycling the tank) I want a pair of them in a 7ish gallon, semi-blackwater tank with schools of blue rasboras, dwarf rasboras, and shadow catfish. I want amano shrimp and trumpet snails, too, but I'm not sure how they'd do in the soft water.

Planting will be rice, rotalas, dwarf lilies or arrow roots, christmas moss, and floating riccia.
 
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