API tap water conditioner vs. API aqua essential

Yes. API Tap Water Conditioner is the best conditioner on the market for those with chlorine/chloramine need. It also treats heavy metals, most conditioners do. But that's it. Fewer chemicals, less issues for fish. And very concentrated.

The API Aqua Essential is API's answer to Prime. It does more that the above, it messes about with ammonia/nitrite/nitrate. If these are issues, maybe, but not otherwise, it is more stress on fish. As for the heavy metals, I don't know if the API Aqua Essentials uses the same chemical as Prime, I suspect not, so it would be better over Prime. The additional chemical in Prime messes about more with chemistry, and prevents (according to Seachem when I asked them) the plants ability to use the nutrient heavy metals. That is just one more unnecessary chemical getting inside the fish.
 
That's kind of what I figured. I'll keep some prime on hand in case of emergencies, but I think I'll switch to API for normal use. Thanks for the info.

T
 
Prime is cheaper to use than API for me, since my water is treated with chloramine; with chloramine, you have to dose more quantity of the API than Prime.

I have used Prime for the nearly 11 years I've been keeping fish; my fish thrive, as do my plants.

I don't fix what ain't broke ;)
 
Prime is cheaper to use than API for me, since my water is treated with chloramine; with chloramine, you have to dose more quantity of the API than Prime.

I don't think so...The API TWC is 1 drop for chlorine, 2 drops for chloramine. Prime if memory serves me is 2 drops period. Is this incorrect now?
 
I don't think so...The API TWC is 1 drop for chlorine, 2 drops for chloramine. Prime if memory serves me is 2 drops period. Is this incorrect now?
I think more API is required. Just by quick calculations, 1 ml for 10 Gallons for prime, and for APITWC chloramine, it is 2 ml for 10.
however there are many different sources so I'm still not entirely confident.
 
I dose water conditioner during water changes using a medicinal syringe, in increments of milliters...no idea how many drops comprise a ml

Prime dosage 1 ml per 10 USG of tap water; API dosage 2 ml per 10 USG of tap water

See attached
 

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I dose water conditioner during water changes using a medicinal syringe, in increments of milliters...no idea how many drops comprise a ml

Prime dosage 1 ml per 10 USG of tap water; API dosage 2 ml per 10 USG of tap water

See attached
apparently a drop is 0.05 ml... so 2 drops per 1 gallon
 
apparently a drop is 0.05 ml... so 2 drops per 1 gallon
I'll trust your math on this, lol

And, why waste time with a dropper when a medicinal syringe is so much quicker for the amounts needed during a decent sized WC? ;)
 
See additional API Tap Water conditioner directions, attached

For tap water treated with chloramine, 5 ml of API to treat 30 USG, 3 ml of Prime to treat 30 USG
 

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There is something wrong with some people's math here. Taking the charts in post # 7, assuming they are accurate, API TWC is 1 ml for every 20 gallons. Prime is 1 ml for every 10 gallons (5ml for 50g is 10 for 10g). There is no disputing over this. So it takes twice the amount for Prime.

Regardless of that, adding unnecessary chemical interactions is not wise, this is just common sense. If anyone has shares in the company and wants to boost its sales by using double, go ahead.
 
There is something wrong with some people's math here. Taking the charts in post # 7, assuming they are accurate, API TWC is 1 ml for every 20 gallons. Prime is 1 ml for every 10 gallons (5ml for 50g is 10 for 10g). There is no disputing over this. So it takes twice the amount for Prime.

Regardless of that, adding unnecessary chemical interactions is not wise, this is just common sense. If anyone has shares in the company and wants to boost its sales by using double, go ahead.
See post #10
 
No comment on post #10?

No, because in the end it is less a volume issue, depending what you have in the water. What does matter is using unnecessary concoctions, and as you know by now I do not advocate this, regardless of the issue or the circumstances. Leave it at that.
 

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