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Adding water to tank with python quick fill

Discussion in 'Tropical Discussion' started by jimmyjam923, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. jimmyjam923

    jimmyjam923 New Member

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    Wondering what everyones procedure for water changes are. I used to use a bucket so all the water was treated before it went into the tank but lately ive been using the python quick fill and filling directly from a hose hooked up to the sink. I use the appropriate amount of prime conditioner immediately while the water is flowing in to yreat the water. Just got to wondering if thats really a good idea. Whats everybodys opinion about this?

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  2. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    I do just as you do. Have been for a couple of years.
     
  3. Metalhead88

    Metalhead88 Fish Fanatic

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    It's best to treat the water before adding it to the tank. With that being said, I do exactly as you do. It's too much of a hassle with larger tanks. I haven't had any problems for years.
     
  4. Fishmanic

    Fishmanic Moderator
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    I sprinkle the proper amount of conditioner all around the surface of the tank. Then I direct the inflow from the python all over the surface and after about 20 seconds I lower it into the tank and move it around the tank. Then after a minute or two I just rest the python on the edge of the tank and sit down and watch it fill the tank and then turn off the valve on the python off when filled.

    I replaced the valve with a solid brass shutoff valve available on Amazon as it is so much easier to turn it on and off. I also put a hose clamp where the thin clear tube attaches to the main large syphon tube as it used to get disconnected all too often causing water to go all over the place. Works for me.
     
    #4 Fishmanic, Jul 7, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
  5. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    I’ll have to get a hose clamp. Great idea! I have had the same problem before with the water ending up in the floor. I’m also on my second valve. Next time I’ll look for the brass one. Thanks!
     
  6. Fishmanic

    Fishmanic Moderator
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    just don't over tighten it or you WILL crack the plastic neck of the tube
     
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  7. Fishdaisy

    Fishdaisy New Member

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    Personally I have found that my fish are healthier and less stressed from water changes now that u stopped doing this and instead fill in a bucket/ pre-treat the water and match temperatures. I miss the convenience of quick fill though.
     
  8. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Adding chlorinated tap water directly to an aquarium and expecting everything to be alright is asking for trouble. Whilst dechlorinators do neutralise chlorine/ chloramine as soon as they come in contact with the chlorine molecules, it takes time for the dechlorinator to come into contact with all the chlorine. If you add tap water directly to the tank, there will be free chlorine in the tank water for as long as it takes the dechlorinator to neutralise it all. During this time, the fish and beneficial filter bacteria will be exposed to chlorine and suffer some damage.

    The best thing to do is get some large plastic containers and fill them with tap water. Put in the required amount of dechlorinator. Add an airstone and let the mixture aerate for at least 5 (preferably 30) minutes. This allows the dechlorinator time to come in contact with all the chlorine and neutralise it. And it allows the water a chance to re-gas. When water is under pressure, the dissolved gasses in it can be forced out. Aerating the water for 30 minutes or more, can let the gasses in the water get back to normal levels. This means the new water won't be lacking oxygen, carbon dioxide or nitrogen. If these gasses are not in the correct balance, the fish can suffer.

    For large tanks, you use large plastic containers to make up the water. Then use a water pump and some plastic hose to pump the dechlorinated water into the aquarium. You can make a U shape out of pvc pipe and attach one side of the U to the end of the hose so it hangs over the side of the tank. Turn the pump on and the U will hold the hose in place and direct the new water into the aquarium.

    People get away with filling aquariums directly from the tap and adding dechlorinator to the tank for a long time. But one day you will kill the fish. The water companies do work on the pipes and add extra chlorine/ chloramine to make sure nothing is alive in the water, and they don't tell you when they do this. If they do work on the pipes and increase the chlorine/ chloramine levels, and you put that heavily chlorinated water directly into your aquarium, you will lose fish.

    All new water should be free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to an aquarium containing fish, shrimp, frogs, or any other aquatic life forms.
     
  9. seangee

    seangee Member

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    When I use to use a hose to fill my big tank I fitted a hozelock type adaptor into one of the hood panels. That way I could just "plug it in" and turn on the tap.
     
  10. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    Colin, your paranoia is showing again. :)
     
  11. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    I wish it was paranoia. Alas it isn't. I lost half my fish because I used to fill my tanks directly from the hose and add a double dose of sodium thiosulphate (dechlorinator). I put the dechlorinator in first and then ran the hose in slowly filling the tank.

    I was in a number of fish clubs over the years and numerous people did water changes that way and they lost fish too.

    I spent 20 years in the pet industry and we had people coming in about once a month and they had lost their fish due to water changes like that.

    In Western Australia we have chlorine in the tapwater.
    Sodium thiosulphate is used to neutralise chlorine in tap water and is the main ingredient in dechlorinators used for fish tanks.

    If you add straight tap water to your tanks, you are playing Russian roulette with your fish's lives.
     
  12. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    Well, your paranoia is showing and my stubbornness is showing.
     
  13. seangee

    seangee Member

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    Its not always avoidable. The tank I used this approach on was 700 litres and I had no other way. I no longer have that tank but I do have a 7000 litre pond.

    I checked with my water company what day(s) of the week they add chlorine. Its always Thursday or Friday in my case. When I need to use tap water I make sure its Wednesday night or early on Thursday as that is when the supply has the lowest concentration of chlorine. I suspect most residential suppliers would be the same but its worth asking the question if you do use tap water this way.
     
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  14. Deanasue

    Deanasue Moderator
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    I do agree. Who has the time or manpower to realistically carry buckets of treated water to large tanks. I also clean and top off a pond each week which is impossible to do by buckets. It’s simply not even feasible.
     
  15. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    200 litre plastic wheelie bins can be filled with water and dechlorinator, then aerated for a few minutes before being pumped into big tanks.

    Most people with fish rooms have water storage containers built into the room. One guy had a 10,000 litre rainwater tank in his backyard and he filled that with tap water and left it for a week before using it to do water changes.

    A friend had a 500 litre plastic wine barrel in the corner of the room. He filled it with water and left if bubbling away for a week before doing his water changes.

    I had triple tier stands and use the top tanks as water storage. I would gravel clean the bottom tanks and fill them with water form the top tanks.
     

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