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Which way is best for killing Cyanobacteria?

Irksome

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Hello. Has anybody had good results with either hydrogen peroxide or antibiotics? My anti algae regime has wrecked my tank and without meaningfull success. The slime algae is defeating me so I have decided to do a tank overhaul. My plan is to remove all of my shrimp and fish before treating and uprooting all my plants so that everything can be scrubbed down really well. I would like to save my plants though my moss wall is pretty much destroyed. Would a solution of hydrogen peroxide or antibiotics be most successful at destroying the slime without killing the plants? I may also need to treat my filter sponges as they seem to be infused with Cyanobacteria. As well as the tank overhaul I will be blocking it off from natural sunlight and replacing the plant grow light with better aquarium light. I have spare filter sponges ready in my algae free setup to do a quick cycle if necessary. Thanks for your help.
 
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Irksome

Irksome

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Hydrogen peroxide seems the safest option. I do 60% water changes every 2-3 days, I would do more but it is really stressing my betta, if I remove him he gets torn by thrashing in the net and if I leave him in I can’t vacuum as effectively. I also have a berried shrimp who just isn’t good at dodging the siphon. The algae is stuck to and between the leaves and fronds of all the delicate, feathery plants I like.
 

Salty&Onion

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You really don't need to use a net, you can use your hand but wash your hands first and remove your betta and the shrimp and use the hudrogen peroxide and then do about 75% water change and then a 25% tomorrow.
 

Colin_T

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Blue green algae (Cyanobacter bacteria) grows from excess nutrients, lots of red light, and low oxygen levels. The easiest way to deal with it is by doing big daily water changes and gravel cleaning the substrate. Try to remove as much of the Cyanobacteria as possible.

Reduce the amount of food you put in the tank, especially dry foods. Use live or frozen foods instead.

If you have fluorescent globes that are more than 12 months old, replace them and the fluoro starters. Get globes with a 6500K (K is for Kelvin) rating.

Increase aeration and water movement in the tank, especially around the bottom.

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Don't use anti-biotics to treat Cyanobacteria.
 
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