What would happen if I took my pressurized co2 off my tank?

wtusa17

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I have co2 on my 29 gallon. I just started a 20 long dirted tank and it has more demanding plants. I want to add that system to my 20 long but I want to add it soon. Could I just take the co2 off the 29 gallon? What affect would it have on the plants? What else should I do to help the plants transition?
 

PheonixKingZ

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It definitely would effect your plants.

The only thing I can think of that would help them, is to get root tabs or liquid fertilizers.
 

mbsqw1d

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I have co2 on my 29 gallon. I just started a 20 long dirted tank and it has more demanding plants. I want to add that system to my 20 long but I want to add it soon. Could I just take the co2 off the 29 gallon? What affect would it have on the plants? What else should I do to help the plants transition?
Can you split the supply to both tanks? If you have 'demanding' plants then they'll need the co2 right?
If you remove co2 from plants that don't necessarily need it then you'll likely just see a reduction in growth. You may need to adjust lighting but any algae blooms will tell you if this is the case.
 
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wtusa17

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Can you split the supply to both tanks? If you have 'demanding' plants then they'll need the co2 right?
If you remove co2 from plants that don't necessarily need it then you'll likely just see a reduction in growth. You may need to adjust lighting but any algae blooms will tell you if this is the case.
Yea the 29 with co2 doesn’t necessarily need co2. And I can’t split bc they are across the room from each other. So I should be fine I should just expect an algae bloom?
 

mbsqw1d

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Yea the 29 with co2 doesn’t necessarily need co2. And I can’t split bc they are across the room from each other. So I should be fine I should just expect an algae bloom?
Can't say for certain. Its a balancing act - co2, light and ferts. Algae is always present in a planted tank and constantly seeking opportunities. Reduce one of the three and algae could benefit from it. If so, you'll probably just need to reduce your lighting a bit, if you can dim the lights then do so, otherwise shorten the amount of time they are on for by an hour.
 
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wtusa17

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Can't say for certain. Its a balancing act - co2, light and ferts. Algae is always present in a planted tank and constantly seeking opportunities. Reduce one of the three and algae could benefit from it. If so, you'll probably just need to reduce your lighting a bit, if you can dim the lights then do so, otherwise shorten the amount of time they are on for by an hour.
Ok. So if I reduce lighting I should be good?
 

StevenF

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And I can’t split bc they are across the room from each other. So I should be fine I should just expect an algae bloom?
You could run a co2 at the corner where the walls meet the floor. Then run the hose up a corner where two walls meet at 90 degrees. Then ru it along the corner where the ceiling meets the was. Keep doing this until you reach the other tank. To make sure the hose is not noticeable 1/8 outer diameter polyvinyl turbing. It is available in multiple colors including clear Or you can paint over it. Look for ways to hid it.

What affect would it have on the plants?
It all depends on the CO2 level in your tank with CO2 and without CO2. In well aerated tank CO2 in the air gets in the water. Fish also add CO2. In some tanks if you remove CO2 it could drop to zero. Or it could sty reasonably high. What will happen is nearly impossibly to know since we have no accurate ways to measure it.

While drop checkers are commonly used to verify you CO2 level is high enough, it is important to know that they will not detect 400ppm of CO2. That is the level of CO2 in the air. So if you have a drop checker in your tank that says your CO2 level is ok, your CO2 levels is actually more than 400ppm. If you are using a PH probe you don't know if it is detecting a PH change do to CO2 or plant consumption of Calcium and magnesium (which can cause ph to drop). If you have a lot of fish in the tank CO2 levels may stay high or at moderate levels. Or it could drop but your plants will still do well.

Will you get algae maybe maybe not.. In my experience CO2 has limited to no effect on algae. In my tank it is always a mineral deficiency (fertilizer in my tank) or organics dissolved in the water. Hair algae does best when a mineral deficency is present. Green spot algae likes water with low phosphate levels and high organic levels. Black beard algae does best in water with high organic levels and possibly low oxygen levels.

My tank has an inert substrate and I use RO /DI water (TDS 1ppm). Tried for years to get good plant growth and most of the time I had algae issues. All fertilizers I used had that problem. Only when I started making my own macro and micro fertilizers did I get good plant growth. I now know how much of each essential plant nutrient (all 14) I am adding to my tank.I am currently using CO2 using the inverted bottle method. I am using 1/4 or less of the CO2 I was using and a drop checker shows low CO2 levels and yet my plant pearl slowly grow with good growth and algae is well under control with medium light levels. I have shrimp in my tank and they do well and reproducing with about 10 times the copper level found in most commercial fertilizers.
 
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