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finfayce

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hi again
i have squished a few. not my nature.
ok let me preface- yes i'm taking my meds😆
when i squish them many others start going to to top of the water. do snails have the ability to see their buddies getting squished and go to the top to get away from danger?
😬
 
Hello fin. Some use a wooden spoon to crush the shells. The wooden spoon won't scratch the tank. Anyway, as we know, snails are very slow and you have them in an enclosed tank. Nothing is getting away!

10
 
In a sense they can see, they are able to sense light fluctuations. And a shadow over them means something bad could happen. They can also somehow sense a near "buddy" disappearance and go along with the flow.

We had a tank filled with them and every morning someone had to scrape the front glass to see the fishes.. And they seemed to be aware of what was going on and always dropped like dead when the scraper stroked too close to them.
 
Hello fin. Some use a wooden spoon to crush the shells. The wooden spoon won't scratch the tank. Anyway, as we know, snails are very slow and you have them in an enclosed tank. Nothing is getting away!

10
yes plus the one i squished were near the top. i wonder how much snails can think if anything.
do they have eyes?
 
In a sense they can see, they are able to sense light fluctuations. And a shadow over them means something bad could happen. They can also somehow sense a near "buddy" disappearance and go along with the flow.

We had a tank filled with them and every morning someone had to scrape the front glass to see the fishes.. And they seemed to be aware of what was going on and always dropped like dead when the scraper stroked too close to them.
wow. it's amazing what creatures are capable of. . watching nature shows in the ocean even scallops can move when the tide changes.
i 've wondered why the saying " happy as a clam" is used. clams live in muck, no eyes and one foot.
man i'm on this phone too lmuch. lol sorry 😉
 
Chemical communication... stop thinking like everything's human and consider while we have eyes as our thing, even our buddies the dogs use their noses more and have a whole sensory world we can't access or even imagine with our inferior snouts. Snails are complex survivors, and they are aware of their surroundings. How that works is something we don't know well. They have predators, and they have defences. They're just as evolved to survive in their world as we are for ours.

Your fish have a sense we don't - an exposed nerve along their flanks called the lateral line. It picks ups vibrations and movements as an early warning system. Tap the glass, and the impacts probably cause pain. It's right in front of our noses, but we generally don't even see it.

I have some Epiplatys killies with what may be a third eye light sensor on top of their heads - maybe a bird spotter. It seems to work like that.

Bladder snails eat fish eggs (ramshorns generally don't, btw). There is research that suggests many species of fish have eggs with chemical defences. They interact with the environment as eggs, and fight off predators. It starts before they're fish, in some cases.

Everything alive is complex. There are wonders in that fishtank even our phones can't fathom.
 
Chemical communication... stop thinking like everything's human and consider while we have eyes as our thing, even our buddies the dogs use their noses more and have a whole sensory world we can't access or even imagine with our inferior snouts. Snails are complex survivors, and they are aware of their surroundings. How that works is something we don't know well. They have predators, and they have defences. They're just as evolved to survive in their world as we are for ours.

Your fish have a sense we don't - an exposed nerve along their flanks called the lateral line. It picks ups vibrations and movements as an early warning system. Tap the glass, and the impacts probably cause pain. It's right in front of our noses, but we generally don't even see it.

I have some Epiplatys killies with what may be a third eye light sensor on top of their heads - maybe a bird spotter. It seems to work like that.

Bladder snails eat fish eggs (ramshorns generally don't, btw). There is research that suggests many species of fish have eggs with chemical defences. They interact with the environment as eggs, and fight off predators. It starts before they're fish, in some cases.

Everything alive is complex. There are wonders in that fishtank even our phones can't fathom.
i agree. i have many pet birds. i know and love the qualities and behaviors that many people don't realize. a common starling under UV light has iridescent green color on their wings. one of the few wild birds in US that are legal to keep, my starling is a great imitator and talker.
 

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