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CryptFan

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I do not think so but because we know you have soft water I do not think you need to test GH
We know the tap water hardness (if that’s even true) not the hardness in the tank, so yes you should get it tested.
 

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If the tank is 30 inches long, it is borderline for Apistogrammas and Peacock Gudgeons. One male Apistogramma should be ok with a few Peacock Gudgeons but watch them and make sure you have lots of plants for the gudgeons to hide in.
 
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wtusa17

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If the tank is 30 inches long, it is borderline for Apistogrammas and Peacock Gudgeons. One male Apistogramma should be ok with a few Peacock Gudgeons but watch them and make sure you have lots of plants for the gudgeons to hide in.
Ok. It is heavily planted. Like I said not even sure I’m going to get the apisto
 

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Reading through this thread, a cojple of things need clarifying.

The GH, KH and pH are connected/related, but they behave differently. First the GH which is the measurement of "hard" minerals (calcium and magnesium primarily) dissolved in the water. The GH of the source water (tap) is not going to change much in an aquarium. It is easy to increase the GH by using calcareous substances (rock, substrate, etc composed of minerals like limestone, dolomite, aragonite, coral, shells, etc. But it rarely will move the opposite direction, softer, at least not to any great extent.

The KH is usually close to the GH, and we can ignore it for the moment. Which brings us to the pH. The pH of the source water is governed by the GH, KH, dissolved CO2, and possible factors in the water source or sometimes substances added by the water authority. You always out-gas any CO2 in tap water before testing in order to get a more accurate result. The pH can alter in an aquarium, up or down, but it depends upon the level of the GH and KH. The higher these are, the less fluctuation the pH will have. This is why adjusting or attempting to adjust just the pH in an aquarium is so risky and downright dangerous if fish are present. The GH and KH must be dealt with as well, especially when softening/lowering pH. Increasing pH involvees increasing GH and KH. This is a somewhat complex process, and really should never be done inside the aquarium, so water has to be "prepared" outside. We can leave this for the present.

The substrate is unlikely to affect GH/KH unbless it contains calcareous substances. It is unlikely to lower the GH. The pH might be impacted, and the extent of this will be determined by the initial GH and KH.

Colin has dealt with the water GH, it is soft. It is not high enough (in GH) for livebearers or rift lake cichlids. So look at basically soft water species...most of the commonly available tetras, rasboras, danios, barbs, catfish, loaches will be fine.
 
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wtusa17

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Reading through this thread, a cojple of things need clarifying.

The GH, KH and pH are connected/related, but they behave differently. First the GH which is the measurement of "hard" minerals (calcium and magnesium primarily) dissolved in the water. The GH of the source water (tap) is not going to change much in an aquarium. It is easy to increase the GH by using calcareous substances (rock, substrate, etc composed of minerals like limestone, dolomite, aragonite, coral, shells, etc. But it rarely will move the opposite direction, softer, at least not to any great extent.

The KH is usually close to the GH, and we can ignore it for the moment. Which brings us to the pH. The pH of the source water is governed by the GH, KH, dissolved CO2, and possible factors in the water source or sometimes substances added by the water authority. You always out-gas any CO2 in tap water before testing in order to get a more accurate result. The pH can alter in an aquarium, up or down, but it depends upon the level of the GH and KH. The higher these are, the less fluctuation the pH will have. This is why adjusting or attempting to adjust just the pH in an aquarium is so risky and downright dangerous if fish are present. The GH and KH must be dealt with as well, especially when softening/lowering pH. Increasing pH involvees increasing GH and KH. This is a somewhat complex process, and really should never be done inside the aquarium, so water has to be "prepared" outside. We can leave this for the present.

The substrate is unlikely to affect GH/KH unbless it contains calcareous substances. It is unlikely to lower the GH. The pH might be impacted, and the extent of this will be determined by the initial GH and KH.

Colin has dealt with the water GH, it is soft. It is not high enough (in GH) for livebearers or rift lake cichlids. So look at basically soft water species...most of the commonly available tetras, rasboras, danios, barbs, catfish, loaches will be fine.
Ok thanks. How about angels?
 

Byron

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Ok thanks. How about angels?
The water parameters are OK for angelfish (which will probably be commercially raised, not wild caught) but the tank is too small. I realize from post #1 that you already have 1 angelfish and while this is not something I would recommend doing it may be best to just leave it.
 
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wtusa17

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The water parameters are OK for angelfish (which will probably be commercially raised, not wild caught) but the tank is too small. I realize from post #1 that you already have 1 angelfish and while this is not something I would recommend doing it may be best to just leave it.
I’m confused. Since I have one angel already just leave it?
 

Retired Viking

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Angelfish are best kept in groups of 5 or more or in a mated pair like I used to have. @Byron probably feels that you tank is too small for more than the one you have which I agree with. I had my mated pair in a 55 gallon tall.
 
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wtusa17

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Angel Fish are best kept in groups of 5 or more or in a mated pair like I used to have. @Byron probably feels that you tank is to small for more than the one you have which I agree with. I had my mated pair in a 55 gallon tall.
Yea I’m giving one away and only having one in the 29. Will that work?
 

Byron

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I’m confused. Since I have one angel already just leave it?
Yes, or re-home it if that is possible. I was assuming you had the angelfish so it was staying. Angelfish is a shoaling species but a group of five (minimum) needs a much larger space, and even then adding new angelfish to a lone angelfish does not always work out.

While typing, you';ve posted more (and Retired Viking too)...a lone angelfish is contrary to the expectations of the fish, and that is something I never recommend. However, sometimes we are left with a situation that is not the best and we have to somehow manage it. I cannot imagine a mature angelfish in my 29g tank but it may be the kinder option available.
 

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