So frustrated with conflicting info from various sites! Maybe a small rant?...

Strmwrng

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Is there possibly any place to go for CORRECT information? I’m wanting to stock my small low tech tank with plants... I look up the same plant on different sites (even this one, sorry) and the same plant is easy/difficult, low light/ high light, needs co2/doesn’t need co2 and on and on and on...really?!?! At this point I trust no one, no site but unfortunately don’t have the $$$ to experiment with buying and watching it die. So frustrated!!! I am now watching a $22 tissue culture of Pigestomon helferi go to heck. So sorry for this rant, I realize as a ‘new’ member I haven’t earned the right... but my loss of frontal cortex filtering convinces me otherwise.:crazy: But really, whom do you all trust for plants and their knowledge of their needs? Thanks!
 

NCaquatics

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Ive always liked a general idea on plant care from sites like tropica or aquasabi, to get a general idea.

Not familiar with the plant you've got, maybe someone here does and can help.

But hey, rant away, new member or not, your frustration is valid
 

Ch4rlie

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Indeed your rant is understandable as there is so much conflicting answers and advice on all sorts of websites.

I tend to trust sites such as Tropica and George Farmer but he is more into high tech set ups and plants but he does have a lot of knowledge plantwise.
 

itiwhetu

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With plants, the easiest thing is to start with stemmed plants, they grow anywhere and are cheap. Then by the growth rate of those you can determine what other plants may or may not grow. I have a book called " Encyclopedia of Aquarium Plants" by Peter Hiscock. That is my go to for plant information. It also gives advise on tank layouts and water chemistry.
 
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Strmwrng

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NCA, Ch4, & iti,... Thank you so much for your ‘go to’s’ ...I admire and acknowledge all of your experience and knowledge of the hobby. Invaluable!! :fish:
 
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I use Tropical too but remember everyone's water is different - that's probably why what grows easy for me doesn't for others. Lights are factory, fertiliser, CO2, etc.
So would you think that the info sites would
I use Tropical too but remember everyone's water is different - that's probably why what grows easy for me doesn't for others. Lights are factory, fertiliser, CO2, etc.
I get that, but aren’t the requirements of the plants the same? So if a plant needs soft water, high lights I won’t get it cuz that’s not what I have? Just tell me what the plant REALLY needs so that I can choose from there?
 
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Strmwrng

Strmwrng

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Sorry Ail, I can’t figure out forums either!:oops:
 

HoldenOn

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I research plants that do well in my water and only purchase those. CO2 isn't technically "needed" for most plants. Turn your light down a little (most store LED are extremely bright) you can get a dampener, dose half fertilizers and get plants that originate in places with the same hardness and water parameters as yours. That seemed to work for me.
 
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Ch4rlie

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I get that, but aren’t the requirements of the plants the same? So if a plant needs soft water, high lights I won’t get it cuz that’s not what I have? Just tell me what the plant REALLY needs so that I can choose from there?

Very basically, yes all plant requirements are the same, light, nutrients and oxygen are the basics.

However, some plants are more demanding than others, these types of plants will usually require what we call a high tech set up, meaning more specialised light units, co2 system for highly oxygenating the water column and specialised fertilisers, there ARE plants that do demand these such as most grass type plants, red leaves and very fine leaved plants are amongst the usual types that has these requirements.

Doing a high tech set up is not all that easy to do well and one can easily end up with problem algae.

Then at the other end of the spectrum is the low tech set up meanings plants that are not demanding which means much more forgiving parameters. Standard light units, weekly dosing of liquid and/or root tabs and no co2 system are usually required.

But generally speaking, the very least plants requires are 7-8 hours of lighting daily and flow of water in the tank.

The addition of weekly dosing of ferts and root tabs goes a long way in helping all plants to flourish.
 

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Hmm.. when he has one for the plant I need info. on, I like this guys guides with tag:


Far as your pogostemon helferi, how exactly is it dying and how long have you had it? Pretty plant by the way I had never seen it before. Is it browning/yellowing, shriveling, thin and scraggly, etc. (any detail helps). Also, what is your pH and water temperature? Do you use any fertilizers? Can you provide any lighting specs?

Sometimes new plants in a tank will go through a 'dying' period as they adapt, but does not necessarily mean they're done for.

From what A. Edmond (TAG, date unknown) writes in that article, it can be grown in substrate clumped together, or spread out for carpeting. For carpeting - it does best when it is all started together, and once it's adapted you can then seperate bits of it about a half inch apart to grow carpet (helps to move past the initial shock of changing tanks when it's together). It can also be grown on rocks and driftwood.

Co2 will help it grow faster but isn't necessary. If you have it in the substrate, root tabs will help it's roots and it will rely on nutrient rich substrate. If it is on driftwood/rocks, liquid fertilizer will do it more justice since a lot of it's nutrients will come from the water column. You could look into making your own micro and macro fertilizers, but you could look into these too: seachem flourish, seachem iron, seachem potassium (always do research into any product before use in your tank, some ppl can likely recommend better products, these are just things I've used before to help dying plants).

In low light it is likely to get taller (to get the light it wants) and not as bushy, in high light it won't be as tall and will be more bushy.

Due to the constant changing waters where it's from, sounds somewhat hardy and forgiving. Try to keep it in water 73°-86° F, and pH between 6-7.

Don't worry about the frustration. Seems likely you'll find a wide range of info. on it because it is forgiving - I had almost the same situation with my baby dwarf tears, and their thriving w/o co2 and lower lighting.

I do like that 1 guys articles I paraphrased though, least for plants I have that he has written about - havent had any irregular problems with his advice.
 
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Koglin

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Oh - also, Ecology of the Planted Aquarium by Diane Walstad will provide a lot of insight into what your plants are doing and what they need as well (Ive only just started it myself, seen other ppl mention it on here and thought it sounded fascinating). Here is an interesting article from tanninaquatics about the Walstad method, breaks things down into easier-to-click-with terms.

 
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Strmwrng

Strmwrng

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Very basically, yes all plant requirements are the same, light, nutrients and oxygen are the basics.

However, some plants are more demanding than others, these types of plants will usually require what we call a high tech set up, meaning more specialised light units, co2 system for highly oxygenating the water column and specialised fertilisers, there ARE plants that do demand these such as most grass type plants, red leaves and very fine leaved plants are amongst the usual types that has these requirements.

Doing a high tech set up is not all that easy to do well and one can easily end up with problem algae.

Then at the other end of the spectrum is the low tech set up meanings plants that are not demanding which means much more forgiving parameters. Standard light units, weekly dosing of liquid and/or root tabs and no co2 system are usually required.

But generally speaking, the very least plants requires are 7-8 hours of lighting daily and flow of water in the tank.

The addition of weekly dosing of ferts and root tabs goes a long way in helping all plants to flourish.
I get what you’re saying, really I do... but you’re glossing over the very point of my issue... I know what my tank measurements are ... i.e.: low/med light (I have a dimmer), hard water, 8+ hrs of light per day (I have a timer),...just give me the HONEST plant requirements so I can grow to my specifications. It can’t be that difficult?
 
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Strmwrng

Strmwrng

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Hmm.. when he has one for the plant I need info. on, I like this guys guides with tag:


Far as your pogostemon helferi, how exactly is it dying and how long have you had it? Pretty plant by the way I had never seen it before. Is it browning/yellowing, shriveling, thin and scraggly, etc. (any detail helps). Also, what is your pH and water temperature? Do you use any fertilizers? Can you provide any lighting specs?

Sometimes new plants in a tank will go through a 'dying' period as they adapt, but does not necessarily mean they're done for.

From what A. Edmond (TAG, date unknown) writes in that article, it can be grown in substrate clumped together, or spread out for carpeting. For carpeting - it does best when it is all started together, and once it's adapted you can then seperate bits of it about a half inch apart to grow carpet (helps to move past the initial shock of changing tanks when it's together). It can also be grown on rocks and driftwood.

Co2 will help it grow faster but isn't necessary. If you have it in the substrate, root tabs will help it's roots and it will rely on nutrient rich substrate. If it is on driftwood/rocks, liquid fertilizer will do it more justice since a lot of it's nutrients will come from the water column. You could look into making your own micro and macro fertilizers, but you could look into these too: seachem flourish, seachem iron, seachem potassium (always do research into any product before use in your tank, some ppl can likely recommend better products, these are just things I've used before to help dying plants).

In low light it is likely to get taller (to get the light it wants) and not as bushy, in high light it won't be as tall and will be more bushy.

Due to the constant changing waters where it's from, sounds somewhat hardy and forgiving. Try to keep it in water 73°-86° F, and pH between 6-7.

Don't worry about the frustration. Seems likely you'll find a wide range of info. on it because it is forgiving - I had almost the same situation with my baby dwarf tears, and their thriving w/o co2 and lower lighting.

I do like that 1 guys articles I paraphrased though, least for plants I have that he has written about - havent had any irregular problems with his advice.
 
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Strmwrng

Strmwrng

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Sorry, not forum savvy. Yes, so your plant authority says that, but look up the same plant elsewhere and you’ll get different results. The same plant will need different requirements. I appreciate your response!
 

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