rams+platy

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tacks

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I have 150 gallons and planted. Can I put platys and rams in the same tank. thanks Ed
 
Not really, I'm afraid.

Rams need soft acidic water and a temperature higher than most tropical fish need (~82 deg F)
Platies need hard alkaline water in the low to mid 70s F.
 
Not really, I'm afraid.

Rams need soft acidic water and a temperature higher than most tropical fish need (~82 deg F)
Platies need hard alkaline water in the low to mid 70s F.
I am think of change my tank. I have been looking to get some swords. There is a guy in aqua bid that is selling wild liverbeareas MAYAE swords. what do think
Ed
 
What are your source (presumably tap) water parameters? GH (general hardness) is crucial here, and it would help to know the GH and the pH too.
 
I am think of change my tank. I have been looking to get some swords. There is a guy in aqua bid that is selling wild liverbeareas MAYAE swords. what do think
Ed
I am using RO water. In my area will have Nitrite in the water. PH 70 GH 7 I have Altums in there now. I think of getting rid. There bogy size is 5 inch Thanks for your Ed
 
If you stay with RO, you will have very soft water and the pH will lower due to natural biological processes, becoming more acidic. This is not at all bad, it is in fact ideal for soft water species: tetras, rasboras, danios, barbs, most catfish, gourami, dwarf neotropical cichlids.

Livebearers (platies, swordtai8ls, mollies, guppies, endlers) are fish that must have moderately hard or harder water, so they will not do well in very soft water, and slowly weaken to the point of death.

Given the nitrite issue, I would stay with the RO and select soft water fish.
 
If you stay with RO, you will have very soft water and the pH will lower due to natural biological processes, becoming more acidic. This is not at all bad, it is in fact ideal for soft water species: tetras, rasboras, danios, barbs, most catfish, gourami, dwarf neotropical cichlids.

Livebearers (platies, swordtai8ls, mollies, guppies, endlers) are fish that must have moderately hard or harder water, so they will not do well in very soft water, and slowly weaken to the point of death.

Given the nitrite issue, I would stay with the RO and select soft water fish.
what fish would you recommend thanks ED
 
what fish would you recommend thanks ED

I mentioned family groups of fish previously that are all soft water, there are literally hundreds to choose from, given the parameters and the tank size. I would need to write a book to cover all the possibilities! But if you decide on this or that, I and other members will be happy to point out any issues we see so you avoid trouble.
 
Livebearers (platies, swordtai8ls, mollies, guppies, endlers) are fish that must have moderately hard or harder water, so they will not do well in very soft water, and slowly weaken to the point of death.
That's a generalization. A lot of livebearers are better off in moderate hard to harder water. But there are a also a serious number of livebearer species that are better off in softer water.
When it comes down to guppies and endlers... Endlers can be kept in soft, moderate and harder water without any problems. Guppies however when big finned will do better in moderate to harder water. But short finned guppies will do fine in soft, moderate and harder water.
 
That's a generalization. A lot of livebearers are better off in moderate hard to harder water. But there are a also a serious number of livebearer species that are better off in softer water.
When it comes down to guppies and endlers... Endlers can be kept in soft, moderate and harder water without any problems. Guppies however when big finned will do better in moderate to harder water. But short finned guppies will do fine in soft, moderate and harder wateri
That's a generalization. A lot of livebearers are better off in moderate hard to harder water. But there are a also a serious number of livebearer species that are better off in softer water.
When it comes down to guppies and endlers... Endlers can be kept in soft, moderate and harder water without any problems. Guppies however when big finned will do better in moderate to harder water. But short finned guppies will do fine in soft, moderate and harder watei
That's a generalization. A lot of livebearers are better off in moderate hard to harder water. But there are a also a serious number of livebearer species that are better off in softer water.
When it comes down to guppies and endlers... Endlers can be kept in soft, moderate and harder water without any problems. Guppies however when big finned will do better in moderate to harder water. But short finned guppies will do fine in soft, moderate and harder water.
Is hard to change soft water to medium hard thanks Ed
 
If you're asking about changing parameters, don't. This is not as easy as it my seem. It is more work and cost, and it makes water changes more complicated. For relatively new aquarists, it is much safer and easier to use the water you have readily on hand, and select fish suited. So many with harder water wish they had softer water.
 

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