Propagating Aponogeton Ulvaceous

goldfish_is_orange

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My aponogeton flowered today, and I was wondering how to harvest seeds for propagation. Anyone have experience with these?
Mine has flowered on a single stalk, and I've read using a fine brush to pollinate will produce seeds. How long should I wait before I see seeds?
How do I "harvest" the seeds? or do I just let them fall into the substrate to germinate?
I've read that for other Aponogeton species (crispus), the seeds have to be dried out for 7 days before exposing them to intense light. Is it the same for ulvaceous?

thanks in advance for any help
 

Koglin

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My aponogeton flowered today, and I was wondering how to harvest seeds for propagation. Anyone have experience with these?
Mine has flowered on a single stalk, and I've read using a fine brush to pollinate will produce seeds. How long should I wait before I see seeds?
How do I "harvest" the seeds? or do I just let them fall into the substrate to germinate?
I've read that for other Aponogeton species (crispus), the seeds have to be dried out for 7 days before exposing them to intense light. Is it the same for ulvaceous?

thanks in advance for any help
Maybe this might help.. if it is the same type of aponogeton plant, sounds like you'll need 2 of them to pollinate the flower to produce seeds.

If it's not the same plant my bad.. was the first relevant thing I could find and seemed to make sense for what your going for

@itiwhetu you might find this useful too ^.^

..
 
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goldfish_is_orange

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Maybe this might help.. if it is the same type of aponogeton plant, sounds like you'll need 2 of them to pollinate the flower to produce seeds.

If it's not the same plant my bad.. was the first relevant thing I could find and seemed to make sense for what your going for

@itiwhetu you might find this useful too ^.^

..
Thanks! I have rubbed the 2 stalks together, but based on that link I'd have to wait about 8 weeks before I see seeds! That's good to know, but what happens next? Do I plant them and grow out of water? do I need to dry the seeds before that?
Anyway, I'll have to do some experimentation since it seems as thought I'll get enough seeds to play around with. Maybe I'll write up a report in here after that.

thanks again!
 

itiwhetu

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Maybe this might help.. if it is the same type of aponogeton plant, sounds like you'll need 2 of them to pollinate the flower to produce seeds.

If it's not the same plant my bad.. was the first relevant thing I could find and seemed to make sense for what your going for

@itiwhetu you might find this useful too ^.^

..
Thanks for that
 

Koglin

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Thanks! I have rubbed the 2 stalks together, but based on that link I'd have to wait about 8 weeks before I see seeds! That's good to know, but what happens next? Do I plant them and grow out of water? do I need to dry the seeds before that?
Anyway, I'll have to do some experimentation since it seems as thought I'll get enough seeds to play around with. Maybe I'll write up a report in here after that.

thanks again!
I did some more digging around last night about this. Found some forums posts from like 2003 regarding it (will link if I can find it again).

One guy explained, that the seeds have a semi-spongey like husk around the seeds. Once they get big enough (seed itself and husk will turn more reddish/purplish as it reaches maturity) they'll naturally break off, and the sponge-like husk will cause them to float for a bit, before breaking open and letting the seed fall where it falls.

The guy then explained, that he dehusked his seeds manually when it was time, and he germinated them by placing them partially into the substrate (as the seeds simply sink down on their own naturally and land, don't overly cover them).

I also read another post, where the guy was germinating them out of the tank (had a tray with coco fiber/dirt, filled with water to make it soggy, and he placed his seeds partially into the surface of that to get them started - then transplanted into the tank after it had started a bit. This will require a strict light schedule, to germinate outside of the aquarium since they normally germinate underwater.

So when they're ready, I would harvest the seeds, then place a couple on the surface of your substrate, a couple partially buried, and maybe a couple right below the surface (barely covered this thin layer so light penetrates). Point is to not bury them fully as that wouldn't happen to the seeds naturally.

Hope this helps! There is another article I have to find and link to the forum after my errands today, so when I do I'll try to find the posts from that other forum too (believe it was on planted tank's forums)
 
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goldfish_is_orange

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I did some more digging around last night about this. Found some forums posts from like 2003 regarding it (will link if I can find it again).

One guy explained, that the seeds have a semi-spongey like husk around the seeds. Once they get big enough (seed itself and husk will turn more reddish/purplish as it reaches maturity) they'll naturally break off, and the sponge-like husk will cause them to float for a bit, before breaking open and letting the seed fall where it falls.

The guy then explained, that he dehusked his seeds manually when it was time, and he germinated them by placing them partially into the substrate (as the seeds simply sink down on their own naturally and land, don't overly cover them).

I also read another post, where the guy was germinating them out of the tank (had a tray with coco fiber/dirt, filled with water to make it soggy, and he placed his seeds partially into the surface of that to get them started - then transplanted into the tank after it had started a bit. This will require a strict light schedule, to germinate outside of the aquarium since they normally germinate underwater.

So when they're ready, I would harvest the seeds, then place a couple on the surface of your substrate, a couple partially buried, and maybe a couple right below the surface (barely covered this thin layer so light penetrates). Point is to not bury them fully as that wouldn't happen to the seeds naturally.

Hope this helps! There is another article I have to find and link to the forum after my errands today, so when I do I'll try to find the posts from that other forum too (believe it was on planted tank's forums)
Thanks a lot! this information is very helpful. Now to wait for the seeds to drop..
 

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