parasites? what is it? what should i do?

Kendramc

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i just noticed today one of my black skirt tetras has two clear blister looking things with white worm looking things in them. every one else seems fine and the fish is acting normal.

Tank size: 30 gal
tank age: over a year
(parameters measured via test strip, so accuracy is low, but everything seems within reasonable ranges considering)
pH: 7-7.5
ammonia: 0
nitrite:0
nitrate:20
kH:80 ish
gH: 120 ish
tank temp: 76


Fish Symptoms (include full description including lesion, color, location, fish behavior): two clear blisters, one at the base of the front edge of the dorsal fin, one at the front edge of the tail. both has a little white worm like thing in it. all behavior seems normal.

Volume and Frequency of water changes: 5 gal once or twice a week, plus 1 quart at a time randomly.

Chemical Additives or Media in your tank: occasional doses of Flourish

Tank inhabitants: 4 gold barbs, 1 bristlenose pleco, 4 black skirt tetras, one glofish tetra, one dwarf gourami, varying amounts of pond snails

Recent additions to your tank (living or decoration): none for a few months

Exposure to chemicals: none
 

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dermocystidium

i have no idea about treatment


There is currently no effective treatment. :(
Removing the infected fish before the cyst burst is the only action that can be done.
 
ok, based on my research into dermocystidium, it doesn't look treatable, but it also doesn't look fatal. is that right? i'm having a hard time finding anything that looks like a reliable resource on it, which is frustrating (paywalls on knowledge piss me off).

it also looks like it only affects certain types of fish, in my case it should just infect the 5 tetras as far as i can tell.

does this all seem correct to anyone more knowledgeable than me? if so, is there really a need to remove the infected fish? and if i do remove it, is this something where i could just keep it isolated until the blisters burst, do a massive water change for it, give it a few weeks to see if any new blisters form, then put it back with everyone else?

and since i've had all of these fish for a matter of months, is it likely to be something the fish had before i got them? i haven't added anything to the tank in a long time so i'm not sure where it could have come from.

sorry for all the questions, i just want to understand what the best course of action is and what i may have done to lead to this/what to do to make sure it doesn't happen again. any information or advice anyone has is welcome.
 
ok, based on my research into dermocystidium, it doesn't look treatable, but it also doesn't look fatal. is that right? i'm having a hard time finding anything that looks like a reliable resource on it, which is frustrating (paywalls on knowledge piss me off).

it also looks like it only affects certain types of fish, in my case it should just infect the 5 tetras as far as i can tell.

does this all seem correct ?
Yest it is.

if so, is there really a need to remove the infected fish? and if i do remove it, is this something where i could just keep it isolated until the blisters burst, do a massive water change for it, give it a few weeks to see if any new blisters form, then put it back with everyone else?
This would be the best course of action. Formaldehyde, methanol, or malachite green chloride or any anti-fungus treatments will help with secondary infections caused by their lesions.

and since i've had all of these fish for a matter of months, is it likely to be something the fish had before i got them? i haven't added anything to the tank in a long time so i'm not sure where it could have come from.
It can take weeks or even months before noticeable signs appears on healthy fishes.
 
Never had it in my tanks and never saw it until a few years ago on here. The fish would have come in with it. It appears to infect mainly tetras but there have been pictures showing other types of fish with it.

Big water changes and gravel cleans will help dilute any pathogens in the water and this might help prevent it reinfecting or infecting other fishes in the tank. However, you would have to do big (75-90%) water changes on a daily basis for a week or so after the blisters pop to try and dilute the parasites. Even then you might not get rid of them.

I would wait it out and monitor the fish. Maybe take regular pictures of them and record any information about it (that occurs in your tank). The more information gathered about this disease, the more chance of someone finding a cure.

Don't add anymore fish to the tank and make sure you have separate equipment (gravel cleaner, buckets, sponges, etc) for the infected tank. Wash your hands and arms with warm soapy water after working in or feeding that tank.
 

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