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Characf

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Hello fish community

I'm new to keeping fish, went out on a whim and bought a second hand tank I believe it's around 300L and 4ft long (not a fan of smaller tanks) just got a few questions to see if I'm doing everything correct

Is 2500 IF all pond solutions filter
300W heater
Thermostat

All that is set up and running, I have the temp of the tank to around 25C atm as I'm just testing and cycling the tank.

I have also added 150ml of aqua safe as per 5ml per 10L instructions and I plan on adding a led light and some plants on Wednesday.

I have also bought plant fertiliser, testing kit, oxygenation pump and got a large bit of slate and some bog wood that came with the tank..
Is there anything I'm doing wrong or anything else I need?





























































I'm new to keeping fish, kind of went out on a whim and bought a secotanhand 1tank
 
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Characf

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One thing I've already noticed, the filter has a very strong current coming out, it's actually pushed some bog wood over and stirring the water a lot.. I have a feeling the fish I want to stock eventually will struggle with this (small community fish) neon tetra, guppies etc would die from such a current? How do I go about this? Need a filter powerful enough to clean the tank but with minimal disturbance to current
 

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I do not know the brand of filter, but it may have a control for the flow. If not, there are tricks to reduce the effect. I have placed a largish chunk of wood directly in front of the filter return which will cause the current to diffuse around the wood. You can also place the return at either end and aim it directly into the end wall rather than down the tank. Depends upon how this filter is constructed obviously.

Concerning the tanklight, make sure you get one suited to live plants. The colour temperature which is in Kelvin is one way to check the spectrum; white light in the range of 5000K to 6500K is what you want. Another clue is the colour rendition, as close to 100 as you can get. I've always gone by the Kelvin. This light will be high in the red, blue and green wavelengths, though it will look white. Diodes that are actually red or blue are not the same and can cause problems.

What substrate do you have? I ask because some fish need soft sand. Cories for example. And plants grow extremely well in sand, so it is your best choice. Quality play sand will work, in the UK look for Argos Play Sand; other UK members have recommended this brand, as not all play sand is the same.

Welcome to TFF, and the hobby. :hi:
 
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Characf

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I do not know the brand of filter, but it may have a control for the flow. If not, there are tricks to reduce the effect. I have placed a largish chunk of wood directly in front of the filter return which will cause the current to diffuse around the wood. You can also place the return at either end and aim it directly into the end wall rather than down the tank. Depends upon how this filter is constructed obviously.

Concerning the tanklight, make sure you get one suited to live plants. The colour temperature which is in Kelvin is one way to check the spectrum; white light in the range of 5000K to 6500K is what you want. Another clue is the colour rendition, as close to 100 as you can get. I've always gone by the Kelvin. This light will be high in the red, blue and green wavelengths, though it will look white. Diodes that are actually red or blue are not the same and can cause problems.

What substrate do you have? I ask because some fish need soft sand. Cories for example. And plants grow extremely well in sand, so it is your best choice. Quality play sand will work, in the UK look for Argos Play Sand; other UK members have recommended this brand, as not all play sand is the same.

Welcome to TFF, and the hobby. :hi:
Thanks for the advice, I have just bought a white and blue LED light, also the first level of substrate is planting compost, then second is black gravel.

The filter doesn't appear to have flow restriction I've mentioned the brand on original post and I have done what you've suggested and faced flow into the wall and it's a lot better still a bit on the quick side but I'll sell how the fish get on when I eventually stock it in a few weeks time
 

Byron

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Thanks for the advice, I have just bought a white and blue LED light, also the first level of substrate is planting compost, then second is black gravel.

The filter doesn't appear to have flow restriction I've mentioned the brand on original post and I have done what you've suggested and faced flow into the wall and it's a lot better still a bit on the quick side but I'll sell how the fish get on when I eventually stock it in a few weeks time

Be careful with the compost underlay. This frequently causes a lot of ammonia initially (for a couple of months). You canstay with the compost soil and gravel, but it does limit substrate fish unfortunately. Aside from the gravel, the soil is a bacterial issue for substrate fish.
 
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Characf

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Be careful with the compost underlay. This frequently causes a lot of ammonia initially (for a couple of months). You canstay with the compost soil and gravel, but it does limit substrate fish unfortunately. Aside from the gravel, the soil is a bacterial issue for substrate fish.
I think it's called Fluval plant and shrimp stratum, I live in a hard water area and it naturally lowers PH and is good for shrimps and plants in which I want both so I just bought it.. didn't know it causes ammonia spikes.. I'll test my water after a few weeks and make sure my plants are progressing before adding any fish anyways
 

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I think it's called Fluval plant and shrimp stratum, I live in a hard water area and it naturally lowers PH and is good for shrimps and plants in which I want both so I just bought it.. didn't know it causes ammonia spikes.. I'll test my water after a few weeks and make sure my plants are progressing before adding any fish anyways

Your earlier post referred to the material as "planting compost" which usually means some sort of organic soil. That is what has serious ammonia issues. The Fluval stratum is not the same thing, but all plant substrate materials are dangerous for substrate fish so there is still a serious bacterial issue here. Upper fish should be fine. But on another note, all these materials do carry the risk of affecting the water chemistry and this adds another layer of possible problems. I have learned over the years that keeping things as simple as possible will avoid a lot of trouble long-term, so that is usually the basis of my advice when asked about these substrates. When one understands the relationship of a fish to the water, one appreciates the issue.
 
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Characf

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I'm still in the learning phases, know the basic principles and I'm willing to be patient with stocking the tank.. plenty of info on this site so hopefully I can find a good balance
I think it's called Fluval plant and shrimp stratum, I live in a hard water area and it naturally lowers PH and is good for shrimps and plants in which I want both so I just bought it.. didn't know it causes ammonia spikes.. I'll test my water after a few weeks and make sure my plants are progressing before adding any fish anyways
 

PewPewChris

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Your earlier post referred to the material as "planting compost" which usually means some sort of organic soil. That is what has serious ammonia issues. The Fluval stratum is not the same thing, but all plant substrate materials are dangerous for substrate fish so there is still a serious bacterial issue here. Upper fish should be fine. But on another note, all these materials do carry the risk of affecting the water chemistry and this adds another layer of possible problems. I have learned over the years that keeping things as simple as possible will avoid a lot of trouble long-term, so that is usually the basis of my advice when asked about these substrates. When one understands the relationship of a fish to the water, one appreciates the issue.
Still debating on what my substrate will be in my step-up to a 40G Breeder. Do folks ever do a sand layer with fine gravel over top? Seems like the best of both worlds?
 

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Still debating on what my substrate will be in my step-up to a 40G Breeder. Do folks ever do a sand layer with fine gravel over top? Seems like the best of both worlds?
The sand will end up on top I think...
 

Byron

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No, sand being finer grain settles to the bottom and gravel being larger grained will be on top.

I don't understand the "best of both worlds" comment. There is only one option and that is what the intended fish require. If you have cories, loaches, and similar substrate fish, or small cichlids which are substrate feeders, you are better with sand (mandatory for some of these, preferable for others). Larger cichlids are better with gravel if not too big, they can choke on it.
 
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Characf

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I want yoyo loach which are considered a bottom dwelling fish, would I be okay with gravel and stratum in a planted tank for them?
 

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