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Need help identifying Apistogrammas

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Fish Fanatic34

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Hi guys I’m thinking of getting a pair of these Apistos. They are labeled as f3 Apistogramma sp. Alto Tapiche and from doing some reasearch there are lots of apistos from that region and I am just wanting some help identifying if they really are Alto Tapiche or another species there where only 12 imported into Australia and I am just not sure.

Male:
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IMG_0652.jpeg
IMG_0655.png

Female:

IMG_0656.jpeg
IMG_0654.jpeg
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They're young. All you can really do is decide if you trust your dealer, and if your dealer trusts his/her supplier.

There's no reason why they wouldn't be Alto Tapiche. They look like them. That sp looks like a lot of other Apistos, and that complicates things.

That fish would be a challenge.
 
Looking at your pics, I'd say the name "Apistogramma sp. Alto Tapiche" would be correct.
 
Make sure you either have a very large tank, or 2 tanks. In my experience (over 30 Apisto species bred and raised) trios don't work out very well. Females can be very territorial.
 
Make sure you either have a very large tank, or 2 tanks. In my experience (over 30 Apisto species bred and raised) trios don't work out very well. Females can be very territorial.
Would a 3x2x2 work if not I’ll go with a pair.
 
I expect they are expensive.
With a pair, you can lose one partner before they breed.
With a trio, you can lose the male before they breed.
So that is a bit of a no win.

My read on Apistogramma is that each female claims a territory. The male also claims his turf, but each gender is aware of the other's territory. Females will drive other females off, a behaviour wrecked by glass walls stopping escape routes.
I don't know where the 'harem' idea developed from - probably old male fantasies getting tangled into observations. I found I could keep a group of borellii together as the books used to suggest, but that was the only species that seemed to read. After a few disasters, if I had a single tank, I bought a single pair.
They are fickle. Once when I was overcrowded, I had two males happily coexist. Both simultaneously fertilized the eggs of one female, just as peacefully as could be. They follow no rigid rules. But a pair, in spite of the odds of losing one, might be a better wager.
 

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