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Light question

Discussion in 'Lighting, CO2, Ferts & Flow' started by Bobby2415, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. Bobby2415

    Bobby2415 New Member

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    I’m gone pretty much all day at work and there is no body home. Is it pointless to leave my fish light on or should I just turn it off when no body is home?
     
  2. Fishmanic

    Fishmanic Moderator
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    You should have the lights on for a continuous 8-12 hours period a day depending on your plant requirements-the higher end of the time period if your plants do better in longer lighting periods and set it to the lower end of the time period if you get too much algae growth.

    Fish need a cycle of consistent light periods to resemble lighting in nature. You can have the lights go on later in the day say at 10 am or 12pm if you want lights on for several hours after you get home and want to view your tank. But consistency is the key.

    Use a timer so lighting goes on and off automatically.
     
    #2 Fishmanic, Aug 28, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2019
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  3. Bobby2415

    Bobby2415 New Member

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    Ok. That applies if I don’t have live plants as well?
     
  4. Fishmanic

    Fishmanic Moderator
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    Yes...fish need consistency in lighting equivalent to daylight - night time in nature.
     
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  5. essjay

    essjay Moderator
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    The tank lights should be on for the same length of time every day, and on and off at the same time every day.
    The room light should be on, or the room in daylight for at least half an hour before the tank lights turn on; and at the other end, the room light should be on or the room should be in daylight for at least half an hour after the tank light turns off. Fish should not go from total darkness to tank lights, or tank lights to total darkness, there must be a "dawn" and "dusk" period between tank lights and total darkness.

    If there are no live plants, the tank light does not need to be on for as long as when there are live plants.
     
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  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I concur with what has been posted. Light is much more critical to fish than most aquarists realize, and it can be the deciding factor between healthy or sick fish. I may be able to explain by citing one relevant excerpt from an article on light I wrote a few years back elsewhere.

    The Day/Night Cycle

    Most animals have an internal body clock, called a circadian rhythm, which is modified by the light/dark cycle every 24 hours. This is the explanation for jet-lag in humans when time zones are crossed—our circadian rhythm is unbalanced and has to reset itself, which it does according to periods of light and dark. Our eyes play a primary role in this, but many of our body cells have some reaction to light levels. In fish this light sensitivity in their cells is very high.

    Previously I mentioned that the rods and cones in the eye shift according to the changes in light. This process is also anticipated according to the time of day; the fish “expects” dawn and dusk, and the eyes will automatically begin to adjust accordingly. This is due to the circadian rhythm.

    This is one reason why during each 24 hours a regular period of light/dark—ensuring there are several hours of complete darkness—is essential for the fish. In the tropics, day and night is equal for all 365 days a year, with approximately ten to twelve hours each of daylight and complete darkness, separated by fairly brief periods of dawn or dusk. The period of daylight produced by direct tank lighting can be shorter; and the period of total darkness can be somewhat shorter or longer—but there must be several hours of complete darkness in the aquarium. The dusk and dawn periods will appear to be stretched out, but that causes no problems for the fish. It is the bright overhead light that is the concern, along with having a suitable period of total darkness. And the "day" period when the tank lights are on should be one continuous period, not sporadic, and it should be the same every 24 hours or it will impact the circadian rhythm causing more stress.
     
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  7. Back in the fold

    Back in the fold Fishaholic

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    All these things that have been posted are aquarium gospel. People who don't keep fish are always puzzled as to why the light has to be on when nobody is looking at the fish. Read these posts and believe all that they say.
     
  8. seangee

    seangee Member

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    Do you work all day and come home in the evening?
    My lights come on between 3 & 5 pm (in different tanks) and go off at midnight. That way I get to enjoy the tank when I am home.
     
  9. Bobby2415

    Bobby2415 New Member

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    Yah I work 6-6. I’m usually able to come home around noon for lunch. That’s usually when I end up turning the light on.
     
  10. essjay

    essjay Moderator
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    It is better for the fish if the lights come at the same time every day, and stay on for the same length of time every day. A timer is the easiest way to do this. It is also better for the fish if the lights are on only once a day, not splitting the lights-on in to two separate periods (you'll find some people recommend this but it is not good for the fish)

    The ideal would be to ask yourself - when do I want to be able to see the fish? If you are only home for a short period at lunchtime but mainly want to view the fish in the evening, have the lights on during the evening. With a timer, you can set them to switch on before you get home so that any live plants get enough light.
    The duration the lights are on depends on whether you have live plants or not. With fake plants, they don't need to be on for as long as with live plants.
     
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  11. Fishmanic

    Fishmanic Moderator
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    I use “Alexa” with smart plugs to control lights in all 4 tank. The timer feature of the plug even adjusts for daylight savings time and works fine after a power failure. And if you ever have to turn on the lights when they are off you just say “turn on tank one” or whatever you name the smart plug. Works for me and my tanks.

    You don’t have to use an echo dot with “alexa” if you don’t want voice control. You could just control the smart plug via an app on a smart phone.
     
    #11 Fishmanic, Sep 1, 2019
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
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  12. Austinbeith

    Austinbeith New Member

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    As I wait for my dynamo hubs and lights I find I have time to think Wondering if it is possible to have a rear dynamo powered light be able to function in a blinking mode?
    Thanks
     
  13. Byron

    Byron Member

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    You might want to start a new thread on this topic as it is unrelated to the present one here and more members will see it on its own. And explain therein what you mean by "blinking" mode--if this is the light going on and off, no, that will stress out fish.
     

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