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how to humanely get rid of bladder snails in a that's going to be taken down

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finfayce

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hi- my last 2 fish died in the 30 gallon tank. even there are no fi've kept it running, because it's loaded and with bladder snails.
is there a humane way to get rid of them?,
 
You could put some lettuce in there and when they are on the lettuce grab it out then take that to a local pond or river.
 
In my previous tank I had “some” pest snails.

I would remove whatever I could during my weekly water changes and I would feed less. It took months but I finally was able to get rid of them.
 
You could put some lettuce in there- and when they are on the lettuce grab it out then take that to a local pond or river.
@Ram419 - Under no circumstance should any life form that comes from an aquarium ever go back into nature. It's one of the basic ethical 'rules' that allows our hobby to exist. Releasing snails is releasing whatever diseases the dead fish had, and they may not be the same as the ones found in Texas. Were the fish from Malaya? Thailand? Singapore? All of these places have different fauna, different parasites, etc.

Once it has been in a tank, anything you keep is dead to nature. And nature should NEVER be a dumping ground for mistakes. Unfortunately for the pond snails, their habitat is the tank. When the tank is closed, they die, or they go to another tank. I figure if I have tapeworms, no one is going to keep them on life support when I croak. Pest snails are in the same unfortunate bind..

There are pressures to ban fishkeeping, and release into the wild by aquarists is a major argument. We have destroyed habitats with pleco releases, and other thoughtlessness. The keepers of native species have a rule they propose - once caught and removed, never returned.
 
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zebra mussels probably being one of the worst that costs billions and billions every year...
this is a ship's propeller
 
@Ram419 - Under no circumstance should any life form that comes from an aquarium ever go back into nature. It's one of the basic ethical 'rules' that allows our hobby to exist. Releasing snails is releasing whatever diseases the dead fish had, and they may not be the same as the ones found in Texas. Were the fish from Malaya? Thailand? Singapore? All of these places have different fauna, different parasites, etc.

Once it has been in a tank, anything you keep is dead to nature. And nature should NEVER be a dumping ground for mistakes. Unfortunately for the pond snails, their habitat is the tank. When the tank is closed, they die, or they go to another tank. I figure if I have tapeworms, no one is going to keep them on life support when I croak. Pest snails are in the same unfortunate bind..

There are pressures to ban fishkeeping, and release into the wild by aquarists is a major argument. We have destroyed habitats with pleco releases, and other thoughtlessness. The keepers of native species have a rule they propose - once caught and removed, never returned.
Yeah, good point. My bad.
 
It's so tempting, We don't want to kill anything (well, most of us don't) for no reason, and the idea of releasing it into a brand new world is nice. Then you see Florida streams stripped of all plants, and huge plecos of all sorts keeping them bare. That little act of releasing one or two invasive species can kill large numbers of native species, and destroy environments.

Even up north here, we have invasive fish smuggled in by an illegal food fish farmer surviving our harsh winters and outcompeting native fish in one local river system. They'll spread.

You guys in the States have fierce border controls that mean I can't send fish to my US aquarist friends like I once did regularly - and for that everyone can thank people innocently doing wild releases.
 
@Ram419 - Under no circumstance should any life form that comes from an aquarium ever go back into nature. It's one of the basic ethical 'rules' that allows our hobby to exist. Releasing snails is releasing whatever diseases the dead fish had, and they may not be the same as the ones found in Texas. Were the fish from Malaya? Thailand? Singapore? All of these places have different fauna, different parasites, etc.

Once it has been in a tank, anything you keep is dead to nature. And nature should NEVER be a dumping ground for mistakes. Unfortunately for the pond snails, their habitat is the tank. When the tank is closed, they die, or they go to another tank. I figure if I have tapeworms, no one is going to keep them on life support when I croak. Pest snails are in the same unfortunate bind..

There are pressures to ban fishkeeping, and release into the wild by aquarists is a major argument. We have destroyed habitats with pleco releases, and other thoughtlessness. The keepers of native species have a rule they propose - once caught and removed, never returned
 
i totally understand. the state i in live in depends on dollars from fishing tourism. there are many public reminders- not to dump any water creatures in the lakes and rivers. 😊
 
I would say either live and let live, or crush them or dump them in a glass of bleach, is the most humane
 
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