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Female Swordtail ???

Discussion in 'Livebearers' started by greenmonster714, May 24, 2019.

  1. greenmonster714

    greenmonster714 New Member

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    When we got her she was solid red but this had shown up on her. She did take a fall when I transferred her from one tank to another but seemed unhurt. I'm monitoring this spot to see if it's growing. What ya think?[​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
     
  2. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Need a better picture but it's possibly a minor fungal or bacterial infection that has gotten into a wound.

    The fish also appears to have a cream film over its body (top picture with both swordtails in) and this would indicate poor water quality or something in the water irritating the fish.

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    Check the ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH & GH levels.

    Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week. Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

    If there is no improvement after a couple of big water changes, then add salt.
    You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt), sea salt or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

    If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

    Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

    The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate will affect some plants. The lower dose rate will not affect plants.

    After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that.

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    To work out the volume of water in the tank:
    measure length x width x height in cm.
    divide by 1000.
    = volume in litres.

    When you measure the height, measure from the top of the substrate to the top of the water level.

    There is a calculator/ converter in the "How To Tips" at the top of this page that will let you convert litres to gallons if you need it.
     
  3. greenmonster714

    greenmonster714 New Member

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    Thank you for the reply. I will try those steps tomorrow and for a while till it either goes away or they fail. I have to orange Plattys showing the same thing. Guppies are fine though. All of my testing comes up 0 with a pH at 7.8. I don't have a GH/kh tester yet but will pick one up in town.
     

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