EM ethyromycin to treat fin rot?

Sgooosh

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AAAH there is a guppy that has fin rot again
i just changed the water
he is in a separate container with new water
im currently using melafix and Stress coat+ but that does not seem to be surpressing the rot. mostly those work but not this time for some reason
can i use EM by api to treat fin rot?
 

Caesar

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Melafix is fairly useless, as it's tea tree oil and lacks any active medical ingredients.

If your finrot is bacterial in nature you'll have success treating with erythromycin. Clean water and a healthy immune system (no stress, proper parameters, good diet, etc) will also help hasten the healing process.
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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Melafix is fairly useless, as it's tea tree oil and lacks any active medical ingredients.

If your finrot is bacterial in nature you'll have success treating with erythromycin. Clean water and a healthy immune system (no stress, proper parameters, good diet, etc) will also help hasten the healing process.
thanks
i will go get some EM
will bloodworms help the immune system?
 

Caesar

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thanks
i will go get some EM
will bloodworms help the immune system?
Bloodworms are fairly nutrient poor, some spirulina brine shrimp will be right up your guppys alley and provide some good nutrition. You can also soak their food in Seachem garlic guard and nourish or vitality to help boost the immune system.
 
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Sgooosh

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Bloodworms are fairly nutrient poor, some spirulina brine shrimp will be right up your guppys alley and provide some good nutrition. You can also soak their food in Seachem garlic guard and nourish or vitality to help boost the immune system.
Ill soak it in normal garlich i dont have all those fancy things…
 

Colin_T

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Erythromycin is an anti-biotic designed for people and should only be used on known bacterial infections that have not responded to normal fish medications. Improper use and mis-use of anti-biotics has lead to drug resistant bacteria that kill people, birds, animals, fish and reptiles.

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If fish have fin rot, it is usually caused by poor water quality that damages the body and fins and allows bacteria into the damaged tissue.

Cleaning up the tank and adding salt usually fixes the problem. If it doesn't, then try a broad spectrum fish medication that treats fungus, bacteria and protozoan infections. If that fails, then look at anti-biotics. But only use anti-biotics as a last resort.

-------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt) or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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Erythromycin is an anti-biotic designed for people and should only be used on known bacterial infections that have not responded to normal fish medications. Improper use and mis-use of anti-biotics has lead to drug resistant bacteria that kill people, birds, animals, fish and reptiles.

-------------
If fish have fin rot, it is usually caused by poor water quality that damages the body and fins and allows bacteria into the damaged tissue.

Cleaning up the tank and adding salt usually fixes the problem. If it doesn't, then try a broad spectrum fish medication that treats fungus, bacteria and protozoan infections. If that fails, then look at anti-biotics. But only use anti-biotics as a last resort.

-------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt) or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.
the fish is in a seperate container (Clear)
should i do this in seperated container?
he is a guppy
 

Colin_T

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If you are going to treat a fish with anti-biotics, then try to use a bare container with no or minimal substrate, and no wood or rocks. Plastic ornaments are fine.

You could try salt in the quarantine tank first. If there's no improvement after a few days, then maybe add anti-biotics, but a broad spectrum medication should come before anti-biotics.
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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If you are going to treat a fish with anti-biotics, then try to use a bare container with no or minimal substrate, and no wood or rocks. Plastic ornaments are fine.

You could try salt in the quarantine tank first. If there's no improvement after a few days, then maybe add anti-biotics, but a broad spectrum medication should come before anti-biotics.
ok ill add salt today the melafix is not working this time there is also excess mucous (a thin string on his tail
how should i do this?
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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Erythromycin is an anti-biotic designed for people and should only be used on known bacterial infections that have not responded to normal fish medications. Improper use and mis-use of anti-biotics has lead to drug resistant bacteria that kill people, birds, animals, fish and reptiles.

-------------
If fish have fin rot, it is usually caused by poor water quality that damages the body and fins and allows bacteria into the damaged tissue.

Cleaning up the tank and adding salt usually fixes the problem. If it doesn't, then try a broad spectrum fish medication that treats fungus, bacteria and protozoan infections. If that fails, then look at anti-biotics. But only use anti-biotics as a last resort.

-------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt) or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

If you only have livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), goldfish or rainbowfish in the tank you can double that dose rate, so you would add 2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres and if there is no improvement after 48 hours, then increase it so there is a total of 4 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria but the higher dose rate (4 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will affect some plants and some snails. The lower dose rate (1-2 heaped tablespoons per 20 litres) will not affect fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.
i have a question, what would 0.4 heaped tablespoon be? i have a 1 gallon bucket
 
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Sgooosh

Sgooosh

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ok, i did salt treatment i did 0.4 heaped tablespoons per gallon to the mini tank. he seems to be fine for now
he seems a bit happier with the salt and seems to be eating better
i will soak some garlic for him since he has lost a bunch of weight
 

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