🌟 Exclusive 2024 Prime Day Deals! 🌟

Unlock unbeatable offers today. Shop here: https://amzn.to/3LmzcqW 🎁

Corydoras have finally been closely analyzed, and...

Thanks for this! I won't be able to remember all of the names, the way they've been grouped - but I get the general idea, and the sense behind reclassifying many.

Video also made me really want some Aspidoras!! Adorable. And espcially since their needing more captive bred Aspidoras.

And Pgmy cory's are no longer Corydoras? Bronzes aren't Corydoras either, but Osteogaster? This will take some time to get used to, especially since we're likely to keep referring to them as Corydoras aeneus or Corydoras pygmaeus, and just generally people who don't care about latin names calling them cories for a long time.

I don't wanna be the person who says: "Actually, your bronzes are not even Corydoras, the species name is Osteogaster._ _ _ _ _ _ _ (insert new species name?)

Needs to happen, and man, I wish I'd learned Latin when I was in school! It was an optional extra my friend took, and I was like "ar you mad? Why would you take on an extra class, to learn a dead language? When will you ever need that? Not understanding how useful it is if you're in the scientific field in any way, like with medicine, flora and fauna - it's useful!
-
 
Latin is just English for fish purposes. Corydoras is as easy a word as doorknob or umbrella. Osteogaster is as clear to say as astonishing. It's all just words.

I have tried to get Aspidoras for years. I see the really expensive ones, but I can't ever get a group if the ones in my budget. They exist. They have beady eyes, but they are so hyper to watch.
 
Latin is just English for fish purposes. Corydoras is as easy a word as doorknob or umbrella. Osteogaster is as clear to say as astonishing. It's all just words.

And for plants. And in the medical field. And in biology... and in... ;)
Teasing! I knew what you meant. But I also wish I'd learned in when I was a wee lassie, and had more brain synapses primed for language acquisition! And they're words I don't know, have to learn and try to remember how to spell, which is made even harder because all are long, with lots of vowels smushed together, and that even if I've managed to retain the word and the spelling, I may then make a fool of myself by asking about that species in a store or on the phone, or *gasp* in a group setting, and then find out I've been saying it all wrong... :eek::blush:;)
I have tried to get Aspidoras for years. I see the really expensive ones, but I can't ever get a group if the ones in my budget. They exist. They have beady eyes, but they are so hyper to watch.

I've never really looked into them before, have just heard or seen passing references to them. Will have to investigate more, sometime. :) The ones in the video above are very appealing!
 
What's a pedant supposed to do now then? Osteogaster aeneus will always be called Bronze Corys, so how can I tell people they're not Corys?

????
 
What's a pedant supposed to do now then? Osteogaster aeneus will always be called Bronze Corys, so how can I tell people they're not Corys?

????

You have to put on your best nerd voice (pull glasses from jacket pocket as you do this, polish them then put them on)
And always, always begin with the words:

"Well, actually..."
 
Well they're all still the Corydoradinae, so I guess we can still correctly call them Corys, just not Corydoras. As always, the internet will be both the first and the last to change, so I might have to give up pedantry.
 
We make a cartoon with Cory and her friend Dora the explorer. They have Roman sidekicks with all the new and resurrected genus names. It'll catch on.
 
Latin pronunciation is intriguing. When I travelled with German speaking scientists, their Latin pronunciation sounded suspiciously German to me. I've also talked with French scientists, and guess what language their pronunciation sounded like? The same for Spanish. Americans will take the "i" sound and turn it into "eye", the way they they say eyeran for the country, or for Iranochromis. In my accent of English, it's a soft "i", like "it". Ultimately, it's a written language no one speaks, and that makes it equally hard for everyone. That's fair - the language of a dead Empire being used whether you speak Mandarin, English, Russian, Bantu, or Inuktituk.
 
I wonder if the Catholic Latin Mass comes closer to the correct accent and pronunciation. But then Middle Ages Latin probably did sound like Virgil.
 
Corydoras=Cory
Osteogaster=Osty
Aspidoras=Aspy
They can all be cute!
Well, maybe we'll refrain from that one for Aspidoras... The way you've shortened it is an unfortunately rather derogatory term for those with Asperger's.

I propose "spidies". Let's confuse everyone into thinking we've all just started keeping aquatic arachnids.
 
My sleep deprived brain keeps trying to tell me they're "Apistos" before I remember the "ogramma" part and give my head a shake.

I think these new names are going to have to be something I try again after a long hot bath, a novel in bed freshly made with clean sheets, and a solid eight hours of sleep. Then IV coffee in the am.

Why yes, I am thinking of having an early night, how did you know?
 

Most reactions

Back
Top