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Black Beard Algae?

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Depends on if you like algae or not ;) It can rapidly spread in your tank and cover just about everything. I would treat it right away.
 

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Algae is normal and the sign of a healthy aquarium--if it is kept in check naturally. An aquarium with no algae is not a very healthy environment for the fish (or anything else). Algae is part of a natural healthy ecosystem.

BBA (black brush/beard algae) is in the class of what I term problem algae. It can overtake an aquarium and kill the plants. It is caused by an imbalance in the light/nutrient mix, nothing else. I have had to bring it under control a few times in my 30 years of tanks, and I have always done so by re-setting the balance. I have not seen it (as a problem) in any of my tanks now for about five years. I have the light photoperiod in sync with the available CO2 and supplemental nutrients.

Never use any chemical to "kill" it. Anthing that kills algae in an aquarium will invariably harm the fish.
 

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I cannot see much through the plastic bags. Are you seeing this algae? Are these new plants? Even if it is on the plants, that does not mean it will become problematic in the aquarium. You could place the plants in a "quarantine" tank, which can be any tank you like that has a light.
 

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Its too much phosphates and not the right lighting....with the right spectrum BBA barely hangs on. The right light and large water changes to bring down the wrong nutrient levels should do a number on it. I hate when when black algae is not just bushy,but can speckle rocks and gravel. When you turn it around the aquarium even looks healthier.
 
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vanalisa

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Here is after I sorted it out
First image is of the leaves most heavily affected. I trimmed them off

The second one us a picture after I portioned out


The guy at the local fish store removed it from their display ~~~" nothingis for sale"
Rank because he wants to scape some carpet plants

Oh was in there forever; the looks don't really bother me...just looks like leaves with borders and clumps of black stuff

I fell head over heels in love with a Panda Garra♡♡♡ sitting on that plant!!!
 

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Here is a clump of Java Fern that I portioned out.
Are the items suitable to attach with gorilla glue?
20200310_221730.jpg
 

Byron

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OK, if I have this correct, you acquired these plants from the store who had removed them from a display tank, sdo the BBA occurred in their tank, not yours. If you plant these plants (Anubias and Java Fern need to be attached to rock/wood as you know), and provide adequate lighting of the correct spectrum, and do not overdose fertilizers, you should be OK. Don't expect the existing BBA to disappear, it will not. The aim is to ensure it is not increasing. Providing the suitable balance I talked about previously is what you want to do. I know nothing about your light, or if you are using any plant additives/fertilizers.
 

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If you don't have BBA in your aquarium?..Then whatever the new plants have should gradually fade away. Different set up and lights. Should,but time will tell.
 
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vanalisa

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I removed the worst of the leaves.
Should I remove more?

It has been in the display tank forever, probably, and the guy wants to put in a carpet and this was taking up too much space. If is was in ther for that long I would think it was okay. It's just that when it was in their tank little Otocinlus and shrimp and my hearthrobs ♡♡♡♡♡Panda Garras were always cleaning it!
 
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vanalisa

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So, no it didn't start in my rank.

It is Anubius and I have separated it into about 10 sections.

You can see in the first picture the leaves I already removed.
I'll trim it up a bit more.

Another question, Do I keep all the roots or j
just the bigger ones?

And another. I don't use any fertilizer. I have API Leaf Zone but stopped using; I don't think, overall, that it got s thumbs up on the forum but I could be mistaken.

And finally, do I put the glue on the wood or on the tuber part?

Ooops...one more. What kind of light is required for Anubius and Java fern?

Jeez, each question brings up another...lava rock----red and black?
 

Byron

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I removed the worst of the leaves.
Should I remove more?

It has been in the display tank forever, probably, and the guy wants to put in a carpet and this was taking up too much space. If is was in ther for that long I would think it was okay. It's just that when it was in their tank little Otocinlus and shrimp and my hearthrobs ♡♡♡♡♡Panda Garras were always cleaning it!
Plants can transfer nutrients from older leaves to new growth, so generally I do not remove leaves due to algae unless they are clearly dead (the stem is not green and solid near the base). As I said previously, the aim is to ensure the algae does not increase. What is there is not problematical. In time as the plants settle and show signs of new growth you can remove the older leaves.

I'm not following your statement "If is was in ther for that long I would think it was okay." What was OK?

Otos will not eat BBA, nor will panda garra so far as I know. Shrimp not sure, but it will not be so much that they could deal with BBA.

Another question, Do I keep all the roots or j
just the bigger ones?
All of them. Anubias and Java Fern have a rhizome which looks like a thick stem/root; the leaves grow from this, as do the true roots. The rhizome must not bee buried or it will usually rot. The true roots will grow into the substrate depending how close they are, that is fine.

And another. I don't use any fertilizer. I have API Leaf Zone but stopped using; I don't think, overall, that it got s thumbs up on the forum but I could be mistaken.
What kind of light is required for Anubius and Java fern?
Plants require 17 nutrients, and these have to be in a fairly specific proportion to each other. LeafZone contains only two. It might help if these two were all that are missing, but not likely. Anubias and Java Fern are slow growing which means they require less light and less nutrients in balance. Any nutrients not used by the plants will feed algae. As will any light not sufficient, too excessive, or the wrong spectrum.
 
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