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Algae

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by skyguy33, Oct 18, 2019.

  1. skyguy33

    skyguy33 New Member

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    Hello,

    Have this tiny fuzzy stuff growing on my plants and decorations. Is this dust algae or something else? Jus thought a UV Sterilizer for my tank. Should this help eliminate it? Thanks
     

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  2. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Probably a type of beeard/brush algae, but whatever, it is a "problem" algae. And no, a UV will do nothing for this or any other algae except unicellular algae that causes green water.

    Problem algae in a planteed tank is always caused by an imbalance of light/nutrients. Here the most likely reason is light that is too intense, not of the right spectrum, or on for too long. These three are related but solving duration for example if the intensity is too bright, or the spectrum not sufficient, won't solve the problem.

    Data on the light will help us work this out. And what if any plant additives are used. Water change info, fish load.
     
  3. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    It's just algae.

    If you have any vegetarian cichlids in the tank they will pick at it. Otherwise remove the items and hose it off. Add a few floating plants like Water Sprite (Ceratopteris thalictroides/ cornuta) or Duckweed to help use nutrients and reduce light, and this will help reduce the algae.
     
  4. skyguy33

    skyguy33 New Member

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    The lighting I have is the Finnex 24/7+ Planted light. I run it on the brightest light for about 8 hours a day since the tank doesn't get any natural light from outside. Too much light? Is there a good way to check for nutrients? I currently add in Seachem Flourish every few days. Thanks!
     
  5. Byron

    Byron Member

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    There are I think some members here with this same light, and if memory serves me correctly it is quite good. But the 8 hours may be too much, or alternatively you may be adding too much fertilizer (too much and/or too often). I have had this algae increase due to my twice weekly dosing of Flourish Comprehensive Supplement, and it stopped increasing when I stopped the second dose. But then my lighting may not be as intense. The two factors have to be considered together.

    Floating plants are one easy way to reduce light intensity and use up more nutrients because being fast growers floating plants take up more nutrients.
     
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  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I just noticed that I didn't address this question. I think the best answer is one that a professional aqua botanist gave me some years back...start with the light, then select plants that will grow under that light and then begin with no additives and increase them according to the appearance of the plants. If the plants are growing well, you don't need more fertilizer, and algae will only take advantage. Always remembering there are nutrients naturally occurring from the fish being fed and water changes. It is easier to add a bit more fertilizer if plants need it than to deal with problem algae occurring from too much.
     

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