Air pumps - opinions

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The diaphragm works to push air through the tube or through the valves, but it needs very little energy for that (outside the tank where there’s no water in the tube).

When the pump is off, there’s water in part of the tube inside the tank. When the pump is on, the diaphragm will work hard to push water out of the tube and to get air out from the air stone, and it keeps working hard to keep the water out. Much of back pressure is the work to keep water out of the tube inside the tank, the deeper the tank the higher the pressure.
 
I have an old Eheim air pump in the cupboard and the instructions specifically say "do not place above the tank". Presumably it would be all too easy to knock it in. Higher than the tank at the side of the tank is fine.
 
on an uncovered (open top) tank that would be like a toaster in a bathtub... but I use shelves off to the side, or the big one in my fish room, is on a shelf on the opposite side of my work area, & the line runs across overhead to the tanks... I have, in the past, set them on the actual tank covers... I never had problems with that, just now most of my pumps are bigger
 
I have an old Eheim air pump in the cupboard and the instructions specifically say "do not place above the tank". Presumably it would be all too easy to knock it in. Higher than the tank at the side of the tank is fine.
Oh yeah good point,
I would have more than likely attached it to the shelf with a bracket (Im very specific) all wires must be hidden etc. I even had to buy a brand new 6 way plug socket for this project as opposed to one I had, its boarderline OCD haha
 
As a few of you now know, I have recently purchased a 160 litre tank that is in the cycling process ready for my fish.

Todays questions are regarding the air pump.

1. Is it a good thing to have an air stone in your tank?
2. Which is better an air stone or an air stip
3. Would having my heater horizontal at the back bottom middle of the tank with an air strip underneath it help with the warm water circulation?
(with rocks / plants in front so you cant see them)
I think it's a few questions, do you mind the sound of the bubbles? Do you like the way it looks then go for it, its yours to do with as you please, there is also a minor benefit of the surface water been broken and allowing a minute amount of Co2 in. Some fish like the bubbles too.
But you can also use a bar and push quite a strong flow across the tank which some river fish like. They'll dance in it.
I like the heater vertically near the filter output. Vertical only so its easier to hide with plants and hardscape.
 
I think it's a few questions, do you mind the sound of the bubbles? Do you like the way it looks then go for it, its yours to do with as you please, there is also a minor benefit of the surface water been broken and allowing a minute amount of Co2 in. Some fish like the bubbles too.
But you can also use a bar and push quite a strong flow across the tank which some river fish like. They'll dance in it.
I like the heater vertically near the filter output. Vertical only so its easier to hide with plants and hardscape.
To be honest the sound is not an Issue. We would be asleep upstairs so it wouldn't disturb us at all. I would have the air bubbles on for the same 8 hour period as the light.

Im also planning to use plants and the bubbles (coming from behind a rock) to disguise the pump and heater.
 
I have an old Eheim air pump in the cupboard and the instructions specifically say "do not place above the tank". Presumably it would be all too easy to knock it in. Higher than the tank at the side of the tank is fine.
Nevertheless get a one way valve. It only takes a small incident to end up with it below the tank. Not worth the risk IMO.
 
It would have to be not running, and be lower than the aquarium, and then have a condition that would self start a siphon… like almost never, to leak back into an air pump… I have had aquariums for almost 20 year’s total, and never used a back flow valve, or had water drain through an air line

However They are like seat belts… safety 1st
 
I only use air bubbles in a couple of my pleco breeding tanks. The species I have come from warm waters so many of the tanks ar heated to 82-86F. I also do not do live plants in these tanks as they only have lights on when I work in the tanks. Next, warmer water holds less oxygen. Finally, plecos come from place with a fair amount of flow.

So, as a way to help with circulation and surface agitation I have bubbles being generated in some of the tanks. Many use Poret cubefilters which are driven by air power and do not need any help to keep the gas exchange process in gear.

As for gas exchange between the air and the water, the surface agitation lets in gasses that are lacking and expels those in excess. So the benefit od air bubbles comes from when they break the surface tension of undisturbed water. And then there is the fact that when bubbles rise, they move water as well.

As for heater placement. I do not get the place it vertical where it is very hard to hide v.s. the chord which is usually black and so are my backgrounds. I never place heaters vertically because they heat better lower down and horizontally and they also move more water this way. Plus they are easier to hide. Basic physics should have taught us all that hot air (or water) rises and cold sinks. This fact saved 6 plecos from death when the discus and tetras were killed by a heater malfunction. The plecos were hunkered down in caves on the bottom glass. The water was 104F (40C) on the thermometer about halfway down in the tankwhen I discovered it.

As for diaphram air pumps, they are good for a small number of tanks ay best unless one buys better quality ones. I have 3 such pumps and they cost me $80 - $90 each. The largest can power 22 outputs. I also have a box full of smaller air pumps I used to use. They are fine for a single or a couple of tanks at best. I have had 20 or more tanks for the last 15 years and I wat at 3 tanks at the end of my first year in the hobby and14 a few years later.

To my mind the biggest downside of air power is the pumps are noisy. I can damp that a lot but in most pumps not 100%.
 
@TwoTankAmin

My reasoning for the air pump more than anything is because I like the look of them. My tank is 100x40x40cm (160 litre) and the air pump that i had in mind was only a small one, with like an airstone. Tucked right up into the corner creating hardly any movement.

I have asked about were to position my heater and my original idea was horizontal along the bottom middle of the tank.
(I originally wanted an air bubble bar (about 15-20cm long to go just underneath it so that the bubbles would move the warm water about?

My background is going to be black also, so I may look back into this. I think i like the idea of the nozzle bit sticking out the top of the water so i can adjust it.
 
I like to use an air pump with a lithium battery. If power goes out, the battery kicks in and my tanks will still have filtration and aeration. Or if I need to, I can run it off a portable charger or laptop.

I also keep my pumps on computer mouse pads to soften the vibration noise.
 
To be honest the sound is not an Issue. We would be asleep upstairs so it wouldn't disturb us at all. I would have the air bubbles on for the same 8 hour period as the light.

Im also planning to use plants and the bubbles (coming from behind a rock) to disguise the pump and heater.
No problem there then brilliant.
 
Bubbles for effect is not the same as bubbles for aeration. However, you will get surface aggitation from both. I make air pumps silent putting them on a piece of coarse foam like some extra piece of my Poret 10 ppi foam. As long as all 4 feet are on the foam and it is a thick enough piece it is silent in terms of vibration.

I agree re the adjusting bit. But I place the heater so I can read the dial and see if the light is on if I look down at it. So even with my short arms I can adjust the temp on most heaters. And it is easy to pull one out of the suction cup holders, raise it to change the temp. and then push it back into the holders.

On the tanks where I actally expect to adjust the temp. I also have an external digital temperature controller. In those tanks I normally have the heaters set to 86F which is normally the highest I expect to set the temp. I can plug multiple heaters into the controller up to 900w. I normally have 2 heaters in many tanks. Sometimes I do compromise and place a heater at a 45 degree angle on the side glass and a steeper angle if I can.

A heater creates water movement without needing a bubbler or anything else to make the water it heats rise as long as it is warmer than the surround water. By placing the heater lengthwise it is able to heat more water. Placed vertically it will heat water which as it raises from the lower part of the heater is still in contact with the heater to some degree so the result is less water gets made hotter as it rises towards the surface.

edited for spelling and typos
 
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Ahh I guess this makes sense as to why people put them on 45 degree angles or horizontal because the heat is rising. I guess it’s something I can play around with. Regarding bubbles are different for effect as opposed to agitation, what do you mean @TwoTankAmin
 

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