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The final output after the slicer ends up as gcode- so yes very similar
Thanks. :)

I HAVE considered getting such a printer. It would be interesting to see if I could fix my Canon Rebel T3 which has a broken battery/SD card cover. Just a 'backup' camera as I have a T7 but it would be interesting as to if I could break down the battery cover and print the three needed components individually and then glue together the parts using the original spring for the latch. Not really an issue as I already have the camera jury rigged to work fine without the cover but it would sure be a plus if I decide to sell the thing. ;)

Is the output hard or soft? Or does it depend on the media used?
 
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Is the output hard or soft? Or does it depend on the media used?
It depends on the material. again, I'm just starting my own personal foray, buy having looked at this for work and for my personal learning for a while, I know that there are tons of options at this moment. A majority of the "entry level - personal" printers work with the most common material (pla, which is generally hard, your common, everyday "plastic") but more and more units are now able to work with other materials, I've seen some home-made prints where the end result feels like rubber/neoprene.

has anyone printed one of these https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/gadget/turbo-exhausteur-wikeee a friend tried for me but the holes never printed. he used a filament printer...wonder if the hole diameter is just too small for that type of printer
That looks like an interesting project. Perhaps you can ask that question in that forum you linked? I have no idea of what limitations my printer has, but as far as I understand so far, the material shouldn't be an issue for the finished product, which simply follows the file
 
It depends on the material. again, I'm just starting my own personal foray, buy having looked at this for work and for my personal learning for a while, I know that there are tons of options at this moment. A majority of the "entry level - personal" printers work with the most common material (pla, which is generally hard, your common, everyday "plastic") but more and more units are now able to work with other materials, I've seen some home-made prints where the end result feels like rubber/neoprene.


That looks like an interesting project. Perhaps you can ask that question in that forum you linked? I have no idea of what limitations my printer has, but as far as I understand so far, the material shouldn't be an issue for the finished product, which simply follows the file
It depends on the material. again, I'm just starting my own personal foray, buy having looked at this for work and for my personal learning for a while, I know that there are tons of options at this moment. A majority of the "entry level - personal" printers work with the most common material (pla, which is generally hard, your common, everyday "plastic") but more and more units are now able to work with other materials, I've seen some home-made prints where the end result feels like rubber/neoprene.


That looks like an interesting project. Perhaps you can ask that question in that forum you linked? I have no idea of what limitations my printer has, but as far as I understand so far, the material shouldn't be an issue for the finished product, which simply follows the file
its hard output used to make an airlift pump. the stl file would need to be changed if you don't have access to metric pvc pipe since the pvc dia fitting for it I believe is in metric. but the site looks good if you can find a free file to mess with
 
Thanks Colin, I'll keep this in mind. I've read a bit from others who have already made parts, nobody indicates using a specific type of filament, however a person did suggest to confirm that the filament was in fact safe for aquarium use.
I’ve used PLA for filter fittings and had no problems, the only source of toxins is what they use to dye it so it is worth doing some research about that.
 
Thanks. :)

I HAVE considered getting such a printer. It would be interesting to see if I could fix my Canon Rebel T3 which has a broken battery/SD card cover. Just a 'backup' camera as I have a T7 but it would be interesting as to if I could break down the battery cover and print the three needed components individually and then glue together the parts using the original spring for the latch. Not really an issue as I already have the camera jury rigged to work fine without the cover but it would sure be a plus if I decide to sell the thing. ;)

Is the output hard or soft? Or does it depend on the media used?
Most filaments (PLA, PETG, ABS, etc) are hard but certain filaments like TPU can have flexible/ elastic properties.
 
Be careful using 3D printed items in aquariums. Some of the plastics are not safe and can leach things into the water.

If you do add a 3D printed item to the aquarium, wash it with soapy water first then rinse well. Monitor the fish for the first 2 weeks after it has been added and if any of them start breathing heavily or acting nervous, remove the item and do a masive (75-90%) water change.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the aquarium.
To add onto this, one thing I don't see being mentioned is that there are 2 types of consumer-available 3D printers: filament and resin (not counting other weird stuff like the ones that work with metal dust and lasers, etc.). Only do this kind of test with filament printers. You can also use the same filament material as is used in plastic pop bottles. After being melted and reformed and any burnt stuff having been offgassed in the cooling process, that stuff should be totally fine.

Never put something from a resin printer in an aquarium - it's not worth the risk becaucse of the toxicity it has in an uncured state. I do 3D printing with resin and I'm currently not aware of any 3D printer resin that would be aquarium safe, and if you were to end up with even a tiny bubble of uncured resin that somehow made its way out it could nuke everything.
 
Working - slowly - on self-paced, self-taught design on tinkercad, my first deign will definitely be the buffer for the filters' output.
I bought a kilo of PLA filament, found out it is biodegradable, so for long term use in the tank it is recommended to coat it with a safe, non-toxic sealant.
The kilo spool is freaking huge. That's going to last a long while.
At $17/spool, not a bad deal at all.
 
NonOilen filament is food-safe and I would imagine it would be better for a fish tank because it doesn't contain any microplastics, but I haven't found it very easy to print with.

 
Looks like a good product but there are a few downsides.

1) It is expensive.
2) Being biodegradable I wonder how it would last in a tank. Of course the same can be said about PLA.
3) It is reported that it is a lot harder to print with than PLA.
 

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