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Jordanella Floridae American Flagfish for algae??

Discussion in 'Algae Removal' started by RinaLane, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. RinaLane

    RinaLane Member

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    Hi guys. I got an issue, huge issue with black algae which covers almost everything in my tank. 1st time ever in 5 years I have this tank my echinodorus plants started to grow like crazy & i even have dwarf grass growing in 1 corner (before its just weathered away & dissolve never could make it even root) but with all of that I aslo got tons of algae.... Its like I can get all together or nothing to grow in my tank. I dont use CO2 nor any supplements for plants. Basically I'm not green thumb person I stick plants in & its up to them to grow or not.
    I change 30% of my water every week, I soaked all fish tank equipment in bleach & yet black algae persists. Its even on my ground now. Its even trying to grow on front glass.... So I'm think about lazy solution to add florida flagfish to help with that will they eat it??
    Its a cichlid tank with also loaches, cories & glow tetras. Never had florida flagfish will they be competitive?
    Water is balanced. Fish feels fine. Just lots of algae.

     
  2. Byron

    Byron Member

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    In a planted tank, problem algae is caused when the balance of light/nutrients is out. The only way to deal with it is to find the cause and fix it. Acquiring a fish is never the solution; first, any fish that might eat algae is going to be very finicky about which algae they might eat, and second and even more importantly is that those fish have specific requirements that must be met or they will not be healthy. Addressing the cause is the only reliable and safe method to deal with problem algae.

    I can see one possible issue right off, and that is the lack of plant additives. While it is certainly possible to have plants grow solely from the natural organics in the substrate (due to the fish and feeding) plus minerals in the water changes, this depends upon the plant species and numbers, the fish load, water changes, and lighting. The melting of the carpet plants is not surprising, as these need high light and good nutrient supplementation.

    Light drives photosynthesis; it must be sufficient intensity and provide the necessary spectrum. We will need to know the data on your lighting so we can attempt to find the balance. Problem algae is probably most often due to the lighting being too intense or on for too long a period; but here I would suspect nutrient imbalance to be another factor.
     
  3. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Can you post a picture of the issue?

    Are you sure it's algae and not Cyanobacter bacteria (aka blue green algae)?
    Cyanobacteria cover everything in a film/ sheet of slime and can range in colour from blue, green, red, pink, brown & black. It grows extremely quickly and lifts off in pieces or sheets and has an unpleasant musty smell.

    If it is Cyanobacteria, it loves nutrients, calm water, low oxygen levels and red light.

    If it is Cyanobacteria, the best way to deal with it is to do huge (75%) daily water changes and gravel clean the substrate, and suck out/ remove as much of the stuff as possible. Increase water movement in the tank. Decrease the food going into the tank, especially dry foods. If you haven't changed the light globe in the last 12 months get a new globe (and starter if using fluorescent lights) with a 6500K (K is for kelvin) rating.

    ---------------------
    American Flag fish don't eat much algae and won't touch blue green algae or black beard algae.
     
  4. RinaLane

    RinaLane Member

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    its not Cyanobacteria. It has black hair in patches coming off my plants & back wall of my fishtank constantly turns brown. Cant scrape it have to get inside with sponge & wash it off with force. Its very hard to remove from filters tubes without bleach. Will snap picture tomorrow right now my fish is sleeping :)
    But its looks exactly like that
    [​IMG]
    And brown stuff on walls I diagnose as diatoms algae
     
  5. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Black beard algae, horrible stuff to deal with. It comes in as spores in water or on plants and once it's there, it's there for good. All new plants should be quarantined or at least rinsed well before adding to a tank to try and prevent this stuff from spreading.

    My way of dealing with it entails stripping the tank down and bleaching everything but others try to live with it and Byron and other people on here will give you some ideas on how they deal with it. Good luck :)
     
  6. NickAu

    NickAu Member
    Tank of the Month Winner!

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    BBA can be treated with Seachem Excel, 2/3x the recommended levels for ten to fourteen days. However I don't know how good it will be for the live stock.

    Ok Byron you can slap me now for suggesting it.
     
  7. StevenF

    StevenF Member

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    In general when all nutrients are present at sufficient levels for plant plants do well and algae does not. When nutrients are scars or missing algae does well and plant either grow slowly, don't grow at all, or die.

    plants need the following t grow well (excluding light)
    CO2, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, sulfur, chlorine, iron, boron, manganese, zinc, copper, molybdenum, and nickel.

    IN my experience if just one is missing you could easily get algae.

    As to black beard algae in the photo you posted many people find changing CO2 levels and water flow levels up or down can sometimes help. And some time ago I found an old post on another web site that stated:

    I wanted to revive this topic after some experiments I did....

    https://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/algae/87902-cause-solution-bba-3.html

    So in your case I would suggest trying an airstone and air pump and or changing the water flow to increase surface agitation of the water. All these can increase oxygen levels and it that old post is correct it might work. Personally I have had a number of issues with algae but I have never seen BBA. My tank has always been well aerated.

    But long term you probably will have to fertilize your tank. Very few tanks can have minimal algae with fish without some source for nutrients. While too much or too little light or OC2 can cause algae in my experience most algae issue are due to mineral deficient.

    While using fish, shrimp and snails can work to control algae quite often it doesn't work because the algae is growing faster than it can be eaten. so the most important thing to do first is to find ways to slow it down.

    It is also important to do weekly maintenance. Substrate vacuum to keep organics under control and weekly water changes are also very important. If maintenance is inconsistent tanks can get out of balance very fast.

    Most algae is floating in the air (microscopic particles) with dust. If the conditions in the tank are favorable once it lands in the tank it grows and spreads. However if you can make the water conditions unfavorable it will die off. There is no easy way to prevent it from getting into the tank and even the best effort can fail.
     
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