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Barbs with long finned guppies=bad?

Discussion in 'Cyprinids, Characins and Atherinids' started by AlphinaNovaStar, Sep 15, 2017.

  1. AlphinaNovaStar

    AlphinaNovaStar Mostly New Member

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    Is it true that barbs will nip fins of long dubbed guppies? I heard that they do not get along with a betta because they like to nip of fins?


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  2. fluttermoth

    fluttermoth The current Mrs Treguard ;)
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    It depends what sort of barb; only some are nippy.

    Really, you always need to think about exact species; generalisations about 'barbs', or 'tetras', or 'catfish' never work, because all those families contain so many different species, it's impossible to make accurate or reliable statements about them as a whole.

    Just as an example, it's often said that tetras are peaceful community fish, but many tetras are far more nippy and aggressive than many barbs. The piranha is a tetra!
     
  3. AlphinaNovaStar

    AlphinaNovaStar Mostly New Member

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    Wow a piranha is a tetra? Guess a piranha would not be good in my community tank.


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  4. Byron

    Byron Member

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    There are usually several aspects to keeping different species together in what we term a community tank. Barbs are very active fish, and many will easily turn to nipping fins of especially sedate fish. Generally speaking, barbs should not be combined with sedate fish (gourami, cichlids, Betta) because of the barbs' tendency to active swimming, as this can unsettle sedate fish. And, sedate fish frequently have longer fins, which even peaceful species of barbs can find tempting. These are generalities, and individual fish may behave differently for any number of reasons, but as they are generally applicable to the entire group of fish we should assume they will apply and not set up a risk that may well fail.

    The other thing is that numbers in the group can affect behaviours and temperaments, as can also the tank size. Shoaling fish like barbs, shoaling meaning they naturally live in very large groups of their own species, tend to become more aggressive (meaning, increased aggression beyond the norm for the species) when there are fewer of them together, and in smaller tanks. As an obvious example, a group of 30 Tiger Barbs (a species particularly prone to fin nipping) in a 4-foot tank will usually leave each other alone, but a group of four in a 20 gallon tank will almost certainly nip each other to death.
     
  5. Lateral Line

    Lateral Line It's full of stars
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    >>>
    Barbs are very active fish, and many will easily turn to nipping fins of especially sedate fish.
    <<<

    It has been rightly said that there are a great many species called barbs. The generalisation I quote there is certainly true of SOME barbs, however it is a generalisation I would not agree with. There are a number of barbs commonly kept in aquaria to which that would not apply at all. I don't recall my Gold, Checker or Cherry barbs ever being particularly active or fin nipping. The only commonly kept barb I ever had any real trouble with was tetrazona, Tiger Barb, and that was at a time when I didn't know better and only had a pair, the male was a terror as a result. Tetrazona is a very active species of course.
     

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