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60 gallon stocking? Help!?

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by ReynaDeana, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. ReynaDeana

    ReynaDeana New Member

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    I recently got my 60 gallon tank and I’m not sure what to stock it with. I have 1 male and 1 female dwarf gourami who greatly need an upgrade from their 30 gallon tank. I would love to put them along with a red tail shark and possibly 2 more female dwarf gourami into the 60 gallon. I’d also like to add some schooling fish but i can’t decide which ones to add. Would this be a good combination? If not, what should i change?

     
  2. fluttermoth

    fluttermoth The current Mrs Treguard ;)
    Staff Member Moderator Global Moderator

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    Could you post the dimensions of the tank, and the pH and hardness of your water, please?

    It would be irresponsible of us to suggest fish species for you without knowing those things :)
     
  3. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I agree with fluttermoth, but I can see a couple issues here regardless so I will point them out.

    First on the gourami...the pair of dwarfs are better in the 30g. You could add a group of a quiet peaceful species like one of the small/medium rasbora (I am assuming only the gourami are now in the 30, correct that if in error). In the 60g you will likely want more fish, and finding tankmates for gourami is not all that easy, so your options would be limited; leaving the pair in the 30 solves that. Another aspect is that if you have a compatible pair, don't risk this by adding more of the species; this often backfires. Acquiring all of them at the same time may work, but adding more once a pair are settled is very risky.

    Second, the Red Tail Shark is also a risk, as it is not a general community fish; it will grow to five inches which means a 4-foot length tank, but it is still o very aggressive with its own species (it probably lived in solitude except when breeding) and as it matures is often aggressive with other fish especially those resembling it (loaches and some catfish) and those with vertical stripes. Should be kept solitary (one fish per tank) with carefully-selected tankmates like the larger barbs and rasbora. Bottom fish (loaches and most catfish, and cichlids) should not be included with this species.

    Byron.
     

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