Winging A Planted Tank

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baker360360

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Gonna try and build a wonderful jungle in my aquarium with little expertise using info I've gathered online and in forums such as fish forums.net of course.

It will be hard to scape my tank as its a corner tank 50gal and has more depth than surface, but I'm determined to get this looking awesome.

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Firstly I found some wood I could use, I debarked it then cut it to size before boiling and water logging it.
I've added 2 juwel light reflectors to my t5s day lights, to help get the wpg up I think it's low 1.2watts per gal,
 

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Some before and after
Got this today for base layer. Any one used it? Was it good?
Dennerle deponit mix professional 9 in 1
 

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baker360360 said:
Gonna try and build a wonderful jungle in my aquarium with little expertise using info I've gathered online and in forums such as fish forums.net of course.
 
Everyone has to begin somewhere.  And I believe the vast majority of folks are just 'winging it' the same as you.  I know I am.  :lol: 
 
 
Looks like a nice start.  I can't wait to see the rest.
 
when first putting fert substrate in do you still use liquid frets? Or will this OD the tank?
 
baker360360 said:
when first putting fert substrate in do you still use liquid frets? Or will this OD the tank?
 
This is a bit tricky to answer, as I am not familiar with the substrate.  Does it give any indication in the directions?  If this product does not leech nutrients into the water column, then some may have to be added.  Thinking here solely of plants rooted in the substrate.  Plants not rooted in the substrate, such as those attached to wood and floating, and likely any stem plants, will need nutrients in the water.
 
Aquatic plants take up nutrients through the roots and the leaves; some nutrients are primarily or only taken up via the leaves.  However, nutrients added to the water can obviously encourage algae, if these are not required by the plants.  I believe I wrote of the balance between light and nutrients in your other thread.  Are you intending diffused CO2?  This will impact the amount of nutrients needed as well.
 
In most new planted tanks there is a fair bit of "winging it," since one has to find the balance and this usually requires some trial and experiment.
 
Byron.
 
I intend to use Liquid co2.
I will read through the leaflet and the packaging of the substrate to get a better idea, what should I look for?
 
baker360360 said:
I intend to use Liquid co2.
I will read through the leaflet and the packaging of the substrate to get a better idea, what should I look for?
 
If it says something like the nutrients are not released in to the water, or only taken up as needed, or similar.
 
I'm not going to get into another argument with anyone over these so-called liquid CO2 substances, other than to say (since you raise it) that I will not use these.  You don't really need them, as there is a fair bit of natural CO2 occurring in the aquarium once it is established, unless you idntend very demanding plants in which case diffused CO2 is much safer and more reliable.
 
Byron said:
I intend to use Liquid co2.
I will read through the leaflet and the packaging of the substrate to get a better idea, what should I look for?
 
If it says something like the nutrients are not released in to the water, or only taken up as needed, or similar.
 
I'm not going to get into another argument with anyone over these so-called liquid CO2 substances, other than to say (since you raise it) that I will not use these.  You don't really need them, as there is a fair bit of natural CO2 occurring in the aquarium once it is established, unless you idntend very demanding plants in which case diffused CO2 is much safer and more reliable.
It stats that they recommend additional ferts ( their brand of course)

I won't buy any more liquid co2 then if I'm wasting money lol

Thanks
 
I use easycarbo in my tank and since using it my plants have gone crazy! My amazon swords are now out of the top of the water and the Juwel Rio 240 is a tall tank. My anubias sends new leaves about once a fortnight and before I was lucky to see 2 or 3 new leaves a year. I recently had to strip the tank back to nothing to move it and since re-building everything my plants were looking a bit sorry. I've been adding the easycarbo daily though and everything is bouncing back - including the crypt that melted back to virtually nothing. I've only been back up and running a month
 
I don't think it's a waste of money and I'll continue to use it  :)
 
Liquid CO2 is certainly not a waste of money, it is a very effective way of improving plant growth.  The question is more an ethical one, since it is essentially a diluted toxic substance, whether you want to subject your fish and especially invertebrates to it.  My belief is that it is perfectly safe and ethical to use as long as it is dosed according to instructions, but be aware that sensitive inverts may not like it and shrimp may not breed successfully if you use it.
 
Water is a diluted toxin.  :eek:
 
Thanks for the replys, I think I will use the co2 I've got then when it runs out stop and wait to see if there's a difference that way I can tell if it's benefiting my aquarium.

I'm waiting on a delivery for my top substrate 2-4 mm natural looking gravel. I hope it's enough 10kg ??
 
I got this 10kg bag of aquarium gravel sold by Amazon for £4.99 and next day delivery (free with prime), seems a bargin. I think it my just not be enough so gonna order another bag.
 

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