What do I do with this plant?

jaylach

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From other threads I think it obvious that I'm a newbie as to a fully planted tank.

Since I recently planted my tank the things are doing things... I think good things. ;)

The following is the top portion of what I assume is a sword plant of some type. To me it looks like the top should be snipped off and planted as it seems to be sending out roots. It also has a pod or bud below the part sending roots.

Thing is that if I should snip and plant how do I do so? My guess is that I would snip just above the lower branch that has the bud and then snip off again just below the roots and just plant in the substrate. Would this be correct?

Then there is the bud thing. Is it going to open to be a leaf or is it going to be a flower?

YES! I AM dumb on aquatic plants. I'm surprised that I have yet to kill the things as I have a very black thumb. ;)

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Byron

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This is an Echinodorus plant (sword) and when they are grown submersed permanently they will produce an inflorescence (flower stalk) as here, but it will not flower; instead adventitious plants will form (as here) and when they have several leaves and roots they can be detached and planted in the substrate. If this is the top of the inflorescence you can cut it off maybe two inches below and use that to help anchor the plant in the substrate.

Flowers will not appear (only exception so far as I know is Echinodorus major) unless the plant is grown emersed, with the leaves out of the water and the roots in moist substrate as in a marsh or bog.

You can also leave the adventitious plants on the inflorescence for a different effect. The only issue then is that the plants being so close to the surface light frequently become encrusted with algae usually black brush.
 
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jaylach

jaylach

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This is an Echinodorus plant (sword) and when they are grown submersed permanently they will produce an inflorescence (flower stalk) as here, but it will not flower; instead adventitious plants will form (as here) and when they have several leaves and roots they can be detached and planted in the substrate. If this is the top of the inflorescence you can cut it off maybe two inches below and use that to help anchor the plant in the substrate.

Flowers will not appear (only exception so far as I know is Echinodorus major) unless the plant is grown emersed, with the leaves out of the water and the roots in moist substrate as in a marsh or bog.

You can also leave the adventitious plants on the inflorescence for a different effect. The only issue then is that the plants being so close to the surface light frequently become encrusted with algae usually black brush.
Thanks a lot for the info! :)

All the swords I have are left back of the tank. Mayhaps I'll snip and put on the right side in back. Possibly behind these on the right which, of course, I'm not even sure what are. LOL! I knew a while ago by looking up plant names from the shipping order and looking at images but can't remember. Just seems like this area needs a tall plant...

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Byron

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That is Java Fern, Microsorum pteropus. It has a rhizome (like a thick stem) that cannot be buried or it may rot (can't see it in the photo, so just mentioning). It will not likely get much taller. Slow-growing, so low light and nutrient requirin; looks in very good condition. Make sure your swords get direct overhead lighting, wherever you plant them.
 
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jaylach

jaylach

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That is Java Fern, Microsorum pteropus. It has a rhizome (like a thick stem) that cannot be buried or it may rot (can't see it in the photo, so just mentioning). It will not likely get much taller. Slow-growing, so low light and nutrient requirin; looks in very good condition. Make sure your swords get direct overhead lighting, wherever you plant them.
They are not planted, just weighted. Thanks. :)
 
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jaylach

jaylach

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Oh, @Byron
BTW, The Java Ferns, along with the other plants looking good has nothing to do with me as I tend to have a 'black thumb'. Since a plant from Petco killed my initial setup I won't buy anything live from them. I received all the plants like 11 days ago and that is how they came. I was totally surprised at the condition and size. I got them from an outfit called wetplants.com. They aren't cheap as I paid like $119.00 for 13-15 plants but I'm happy with what I got. I don't mind paying if there is quality.
 
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jaylach

jaylach

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I've noticed something with one Java Fern. Going on a guess as it is in a group I think it has seven leaves. While the other Java Ferns are totally green and look great this one has three leaves that worry me a bit. Tow leaves have some brown along the middle of the leaf along the center 'rib'. The same plant has a leaf with a horizontal black band near the top of the leaf with good green above and below.

Should I let nature take its course or should I prune the questionable leaves? This odd coloration has just appeared within the last two days. Let's see if I can actually get a photo...


OK, here is what I'm talking about. The first is the black band on the leaf and the second shows the brown. My inclination is to prune these leaves as close to the bottom as possible as there are plenty of leaves on the plant that look totally healthy. But I don't know aquatic ... or land ... plants and don't know if my thought is right. Shoot, for all I know, the best thing to do might be to just leave the thing alone. This is just two leaves out of 5-7. All the rest look totally healthy on the plant.


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Byron

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Unless the condition spreads to other leaves, I would not worry about it. You can prune these leaves out, cut them near the rhizome.

By "spread" I do not imply that something bad like a fungus is going to spread to adjoining leaves; I just mean if the healthy leaves begin to deteriorate then it is something to be concerned about as conditions (light/nutrients) may not be optimal. Also keep in mind that it takes time (a few days to a few weeks depending) for changes in plants to be noticeable. We cannot expect results overnight.
 
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jaylach

jaylach

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Unless the condition spreads to other leaves, I would not worry about it. You can prune these leaves out, but them near the rhizome.

By "spread" I do not imply that something bad like a fungus is going to spread to adjoining leaves; I just mean if the healthy leaves begin to deteriorate then it is something to be concerned about as conditions (light/nutrients) may not be optimal. Also keep in mind that it takes time (a few days to a few weeks depending) for changes in plants to be noticeable. We cannot expect results overnight.
Thanks. :) I guess, since I'm not used to live plants, that I worry too much. ;)
 

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