My opinions on community tanks

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I understand that you have a community tank, and that's okay. I gave up on community tanks because they are overrated and dominates the hobby. I don't want to be one of the many people who admire community tanks. I'm born different.
As already been stated overhere, a community tank is just a tank with more than one fish (or invertebrates) species. Nothing more, nothing less. But you should make the difference between a biotope and a self interpreted scaped tank. That's the only difference...
 
Community aquaria mean putting fish and plants from different continents
That's totally incorrect. It's got nothing to do with fish being from another continent. As I was stating before, it's just a tank with more than just one fish or invertebrate species. This means that also a biotope tank with more than one fish or invertebrate species from the same location is a community tank.
 
The way I always understood it is that there are 2 main types of tanks, a community tank, which houses more than one species of fish together, and a single species tank, which obviously houses only one species on its own. A biotope is a type of community tank where you try to simulate a specific habitat by choosing fish, invertebrates, substrate, plants, decor, etc. that mimic what would be seen in the wild.
 
I keep species only aquariums . Only one species per aquarium . The fish act naturally without having to look over their shoulders . The community aquarium is a myth and never works . You might think it works but it will blow up in your face sooner or later . Don’t stress your nice fish by keeping them with strangers .
 
That's totally incorrect. It's got nothing to do with fish being from another continent. As I was stating before, it's just a tank with more than just one fish or invertebrate species. This means that also a biotope tank with more than one fish or invertebrate species from the same location is a community tank.
Ah, sorry about that. That was my definition of a community tank.
 
@emeraldking @Essjay I understand that people have differing definitions of community tanks. I dislike community tanks, but they are good for the household. But community tanks are not my cup of tea. I'm currently doing a budget list for the items I need for my project. I just need some motivation to make it work.
 
The way I always understood it is that there are 2 main types of tanks, a community tank, which houses more than one species of fish together, and a single species tank, which obviously houses only one species on its own. A biotope is a type of community tank where you try to simulate a specific habitat by choosing fish, invertebrates, substrate, plants, decor, etc. that mimic what would be seen in the wild.
I didn't know about that. I thought biotopes weren't community tanks.
 
You have mentioned somewhere having a tank with only cardinals. If the plants and decor are from the same river as cardinals are found, that's a biotope. It would also be a single species tank.
If you were to add another species of fish from the same river as cardinals are found in the wild, it would still be a biotope but it would also be a community tank.

To repeat what Gary E said
Single species tank - one which contains only one species of fish.
Community tank - one which contains at least two different species of fish.
Biotope - a tank where everything in it is found in the wild in one small section of a river or lake.
Regional tank - one which contains fish from the same geographical area but may not live together in one specific river or lake.

A single species tank may or may not be a biotope depending on the plants, substrate and type of decor.
A community tank can be a biotope and a regional tank and a tank with fish from different parts of the world.
A biotope can be a single species tank or a community tank.
 
You have mentioned somewhere having a tank with only cardinals. If the plants and decor are from the same river as cardinals are found, that's a biotope. It would also be a single species tank.
If you were to add another species of fish from the same river as cardinals are found in the wild, it would still be a biotope but it would also be a community tank.

To repeat what Gary E said
Single species tank - one which contains only one species of fish.
Community tank - one which contains at least two different species of fish.
Biotope - a tank where everything in it is found in the wild in one small section of a river or lake.
Regional tank - one which contains fish from the same geographical area but may not live together in one specific river or lake.

A single species tank may or may not be a biotope depending on the plants, substrate and type of decor.
A community tank can be a biotope and a regional tank and a tank with fish from different parts of the world.
A biotope can be a single species tank or a community tank.
Yes, I understood Gary's definitions. I changed up the stocking plans for my project earlier so I can save money. Now I understand on what you were saying on the last bit.
 
It's a fact that there's just one definition of a community tank.

But if you would put more than one fish species in your biotope tank, it will be a community tank.
Yes, I know. I get that. I was talking about the traditional community tank where you put any fish you like as long as they live together.
 
So, I am fairly involved in the herpetofauna hobby in addition to my aquarium keeping. Within that culture mixing of species, colloquially termed "cohabing" derived from cohabitation, is generally, though not universally, considered poor practice. I often see people with aquarium experience shifting over to the herpetofauna world and expect to keep "community vivariums", and then receive a venom-filled exhorting.

In many ways, both hobbies are quite similar. And yet they have developed very distinct cultural acceptances of this issue of mixing species. This is despite the same inherent risks to the captive organisms existing in both when coahabing is practiced. As well as the same benefits for the keepers. It has often left me wondering whether the herpetofauna hobby should be more open to experimentation with cohabing, and perhaps by the same token, the aquarium hobby more critical of it?

To be clear, I am not here to extol one approach, nor demonize the other. But this thread did get me, once again, pondering the virtual lack of discourse around the concept of cohabing aquatic life in this hobby. I wonder if anyone has any insights on the distinct approaches accepted in each community?
 

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