Just a few questions...

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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Of your list, I suspect the cardinals may be safe enough.
I've learned that all fish would chow down on the tiny shrimplets, so there has to be lots of cover to give them half a chance of growing to an unpalatable size.
 

Essjay

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You don't need creatures as aquarium cleaners.

If you mean to eat left over food, you are feeding too much
If you mean algae, sort out why there is algae and remedy the cause
If you mean fish poop on the bottom of the tank, creatures don't eat that, it is the fish keeper's job to remove it.

We should only ever buy fish/shrimps etc because we want to keep them for themselves not to do a job or to try to solve a problem.
 

Slaphppy7

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Ahhhh.....With that selection of fish I would expect the shrimps to be expensive fish food. Having witnessed similar sized fish in my main tank actively hunting shrimps and killing them, I doubt many shrimps would survive, I'm afraid.
I've kept RCS with just about all of the tetras the OP has listed.

The key to the shrimp's survival has already been alluded to; densely planted tank, with lots of deco to hide in, until the shrimp reach adult size
 

Essjay

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My shrimps started to disappear after I moved them to my main tank. The culprits were daisy's ricefish (Oryzias woworae) which I witnessed hunting the shrimps. That's when I decided to move them into the betta tank after the last betta died. Maybe I was just unlucky with this species, but it has put me off mixing shrimps with any but the tiniest fish :(
 
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AnimalloveršŸ˜

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I just read up about Seachem Stability. Is it true that it can get nitrifying bacteria in the tank after 24 hrs? If this is true, can I add a lot of fish at one time?
 

Byron

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I just read up about Seachem Stability. Is it true that it can get nitrifying bacteria in the tank after 24 hrs? If this is true, can I add a lot of fish at one time?

No, but partly yes. First, Stability may help even though it has the "wrong" bacteria for nitrification. Tetra SafeStart would be preferable, or Dr. Tim's One and Only but the latter I think adds ammonia and in fact "cycles" faster, but I do not know if you can have fish present, I wouldn't think so if ammonia is going in.

If you artificially cycle the tank with ammonia, and manage to get zero ammonia and nitrite test readings for a period of days, it should be safe to add fish but not a lot at once.

If you have live plants, and floating plants particularly, and they are clearly growing, then you can add all the fish you intend without any problem. Just make sure the fast-growing plants are actually alive and growing, not dying off.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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I just read up about Seachem Stability. Is it true that it can get nitrifying bacteria in the tank after 24 hrs? If this is true, can I add a lot of fish at one time?
Microbe-Lift Special Blend is a mix of bacteria for turning ammonia into nitrite.
Microbe-Lift II is purely bacteria for turning nitrite into nitrate.
Evidence from my own two tanks suggested strongly that these work, as described on the Microbe-Lift website.

HOWEVER...many of the failures associated with any bottled bacteria seem to centre on the potential fishkeeper's impatience to get fish in the tank...especially 'a lot of fish'.
Such are the alleged wonders of these products that buyers totally forget or ignore the research that should've taught them that they are creating a relatively complex ecosystem.

LOTS of things have to go right, for success.
Only one thing has to go wrong for complete catastrophe.
(A bit like launching the Space Shuttle, apparently ;) ).
 

Essjay

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Construction sand is often coarse and rough which is not good for bottom dwelling fish. Many members use pool filter sand, but again check it is smooth by rubbing some between your fingers.
 

itiwhetu

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should I use pool filter sand,or construction sand? I'm thinking pool filter sand will be cleaner
If you are going to use sand make sure it is smooth. Watch out for those sharp edged silica slithers that will damage your fish gills and intestines. Make sure your sand is natural and not man made.
 

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