Harlequin Rasbora issues please help

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daquestion4u

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He's really great for scaping tanks, and a fun channel to watch, but he admits himself that he's really quite new to the hobby in many ways, so for fishkeeping, it's worth branching out for learning more about the fish themselves. Aquarium co op gives a lot of good advice, and his streams are easy to put on the background and listen to while doing tank maintenance. He's not perfect by any means, but he knows a good deal. Searching that channel for any typical aquarium advice usualy turns up good videos too, like how to maximise your filter, how to gravel vac and clean your tank properly, things like that. The Secret Life of Your Aquarium is very knowledgeable, as is Rachel O'Leary, some others I can't think of right now, but could find for you later if you're interested.

Have to sift through them, since anyone can make a fishtuber channel, and not all are good. But worth branching out and checking out some that are more geared to learning about fish species and the hobby as a whole, and not just creating aquariums as visually stunning as MD Fishtanks ones admittedly are!
yeah thats what captured me his scapes are great ill check your recommendations out for sure thank you
 
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daquestion4u

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Unfortunately the sick guy passed last night I did the 75% water change. . The remaining fish seem active and are eating and look better today. I used Petsmarts preconditioned Aquarium water for the water change let me know if that is okay. Also In hindsite is it possible the fish was bullied i would notice when i would feed the rasboras would nip at one another maybe they were just all after him it was hard to tell? Also when they were not eating every so often one fish would be away from the group or sometime he would be in the group or mayvbe he was sick from the time i got him but he ate and was active for a good while.
the rasboras have spent the last hours swimming through the bubbler bubbles which not sure what that means but previously i think they did this for fun as it shotts them across the tank then swim back around the corner behind it and do it again like a slide and children hopefully their just having fun
 

Colin_T

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I don't know what the pet shop's preconditioned water is.

Rasboras like to be in groups of at least 6 (preferably 10) or more or their own kind. They can sometimes nip at each other but aren't renown for biting or bullying. This is unlikely to be the cause of death.
 
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daquestion4u

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I don't know what the pet shop's preconditioned water is.

Rasboras like to be in groups of at least 6 (preferably 10) or more or their own kind. They can sometimes nip at each other but aren't renown for biting or bullying. This is unlikely to be the cause of death.
okay everyone seems to be doing good they were a little frightened for a bit as it was my first huge water change. I have a few questions as i have seen different answers. 1st how long should i leave the aquarium light on. 2nd how many times should i feed ive seen from once a day to 3 times even i know overfeeding can cause issues so i dont want to do that.
 
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daquestion4u

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I don't know what the pet shop's preconditioned water is.

Rasboras like to be in groups of at least 6 (preferably 10) or more or their own kind. They can sometimes nip at each other but aren't renown for biting or bullying. This is unlikely to be the cause of death.
here is a pick of the water and also another pic i have i know it is tough to see with the bubbles but the white protruding from this fish here on HIS left you can see its like the fin if thats what it is is white and like stiff the other one that passed had this also but this fish is schooling, eating and swimming around like he is good. I tried for hours to get a good pick but its tough they are fast and my phone sucks apparently
 

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Byron

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1st how long should i leave the aquarium light on.

This is variable, but generally you want to have anywhere from five or six hours up to eight, maybe nine or ten. If you have live plants, a minimum of six hours will provide adequate photoperiod within each 24 hours. Problem algae is usually the guide. If there are no plants, algae doesn't matter as much, but the more light the more likely you may get problem algae. The photoperiod should be consistent, the same time each day, this is important for the fish. It can be centered around the time you are normally home to view the aquarium. Use a timer to make it consistent. The room must be in ambient light when the tank light comes on and goes off in order to avoid shocking the fish; it takes at least 30 minutes for fish eyes to adjust.

2nd how many times should i feed ive seen from once a day to 3 times even i know overfeeding can cause issues so i dont want to do that.

Fry need more frequent feeding. But otherwise feed only once a day, and missing one or two days each week will certainly not hurt. Fish do not need as much energy as birds and mammals because they are ectotherms, and aquarium fish are not using energy to hunt and avoid predators. Fish will always seem to be hungry, that is instinct as they are opportunistic feeders in the wild.
 
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daquestion4u

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I don't know what the pet shop's preconditioned water is.

Rasboras like to be in groups of at least 6 (preferably 10) or more or their own kind. They can sometimes nip at each other but aren't renown for biting or bullying. This is unlikely to be the cause of death.
heres another pic i cant get much better but you can see the left pectoral is white and looks like it is hardened almost like it is stiff sorry for all the messages just want to try to make sure no one else dies i am down to 5 total should i go get more is the group to small once i can confirm my tank is good of course
 

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Colin_T

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The white on the pectoral (side) fin looks like fungus or excess mucous. I will say fungus at this stage. it also looks like it is spreading across the side of the fish's face. Salt should treat it, (see directions below).

---------------------
SALT
You can add rock salt (often sold as aquarium salt) or swimming pool salt to the aquarium at the dose rate of 1 heaped tablespoon per 20 litres of water. If there is no improvement after 48 hours you can double that dose rate so there is 2 heaped tablespoons of salt per 20 litres.

Keep the salt level like this for at least 2 weeks but no longer than 4 weeks otherwise kidney damage can occur. Kidney damage is more likely to occur in fish from soft water (tetras, Corydoras, angelfish, Bettas & gouramis, loaches) that are exposed to high levels of salt for an extended period of time, and is not an issue with livebearers, rainbowfish or other salt tolerant species.

The salt will not affect the beneficial filter bacteria, fish, plants, shrimp or snails.

After you use salt and the fish have recovered, you do a 10% water change each day for a week using only fresh water that has been dechlorinated. Then do a 20% water change each day for a week. Then you can do bigger water changes after that. This dilutes the salt out of the tank slowly so it doesn't harm the fish.

If you do water changes while using salt, you need to treat the new water with salt before adding it to the tank. This will keep the salt level stable in the tank and minimise stress on the fish.

When you first add salt, add the salt to a small bucket of tank water and dissolve the salt. Then slowly pour the salt water into the tank near the filter outlet. Add the salt over a couple of minutes.
 

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BOTTLED FISH WATER
I'm not sure how much you pay for the bottled aquarium water but it might be cheaper to buy bottled water from a supermarket, or dechlorinate your own tap water.

What is the GH (general hardness), KH (carbonate hardness) and pH of your water supply?
This information can usually be obtained from your water supply company's website or by telephoning them. If they can't help you, take a glass full of tap water to the local pet shop and get them to test it for you. Write the results down (in numbers) when they do the tests. And ask them what the results are in (eg: ppm, dGH, or something else).

If your tap water has a suitable pH, GH & KH, then you can use a dechlorinator to remove chlorine/ chloramine from the tap water to make it safe for the fish. This might be a cheaper option compared to buying bottles of water from a pet shop.

You might also want to get the bottled pet shop water tested for pH, GH & KH and see what it is.

Sorry if this sounds funny, but I have concerns about what they are selling as bottled aquarium water. It is not suitable for human consumption but is fine for fish?


--------------------
LIGHTING TIMES
Most aquarium plants like a bit of light and if you only have the light on for a couple of hours a day, they struggle. If the light doesn't have a high enough wattage they also struggle. Try having the tank lights on for 8-12 hours a day.

If you get lots of green algae then reduce the light by an hour a day and monitor the algae over the next 2 weeks.
If you don't get any green algae on the glass then increase the lighting period by an hour and monitor it.
If you get a small amount of algae then the lighting time is about right.

Some plants will close their leaves up when they have had sufficient light. Ambulia, Hygrophilas and a few others close their top set of leaves first, then the next set and so on down the stem. When you see this happening, wait an hour after the leaves have closed up against the stem and then turn lights off.

Plant lights should have equal amount of red and blue light and a bit less green light.


--------------------
TURNING LIGHTS ON AND OFF
Stress from tank lights coming on when the room is dark can be an issue. Fish don't have eyelids and don't tolerate going from complete dark to bright light (or vice versa) instantly.

In the morning open the curtains or turn the room light on at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the tank light on. This will reduce the stress on the fish and they won't go from a dark tank to a bright tank instantly.

At night turn the room light on and then turn the tank light off. Wait at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the room light out. This allows the fish to settle down for the night instead of going from a brightly lit tank to complete darkness instantly.

Try to have the lights on at the same time each day. Use a timer if possible.


--------------------
TWO LIGHT UNITS
If you have two light units on the tank, put them on timers and have one come on first, then an hour later the second one can come on. It will be less stressful for the fish.

In the evening, turn the first light off and wait an hour, then have the second light go out.

If the lights have a low, medium and high intensity setting, have them on low in the morning, then increase it to medium after a couple of hours, and then high for the main part of the day. In the evening, reverse this and have the medium setting for a few hours, then low. Then turn the lights off.
 
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daquestion4u

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BOTTLED FISH WATER
I'm not sure how much you pay for the bottled aquarium water but it might be cheaper to buy bottled water from a supermarket, or dechlorinate your own tap water.

What is the GH (general hardness), KH (carbonate hardness) and pH of your water supply?
This information can usually be obtained from your water supply company's website or by telephoning them. If they can't help you, take a glass full of tap water to the local pet shop and get them to test it for you. Write the results down (in numbers) when they do the tests. And ask them what the results are in (eg: ppm, dGH, or something else).

If your tap water has a suitable pH, GH & KH, then you can use a dechlorinator to remove chlorine/ chloramine from the tap water to make it safe for the fish. This might be a cheaper option compared to buying bottles of water from a pet shop.

You might also want to get the bottled pet shop water tested for pH, GH & KH and see what it is.

Sorry if this sounds funny, but I have concerns about what they are selling as bottled aquarium water. It is not suitable for human consumption but is fine for fish?


--------------------
LIGHTING TIMES
Most aquarium plants like a bit of light and if you only have the light on for a couple of hours a day, they struggle. If the light doesn't have a high enough wattage they also struggle. Try having the tank lights on for 8-12 hours a day.

If you get lots of green algae then reduce the light by an hour a day and monitor the algae over the next 2 weeks.
If you don't get any green algae on the glass then increase the lighting period by an hour and monitor it.
If you get a small amount of algae then the lighting time is about right.

Some plants will close their leaves up when they have had sufficient light. Ambulia, Hygrophilas and a few others close their top set of leaves first, then the next set and so on down the stem. When you see this happening, wait an hour after the leaves have closed up against the stem and then turn lights off.

Plant lights should have equal amount of red and blue light and a bit less green light.


--------------------
TURNING LIGHTS ON AND OFF
Stress from tank lights coming on when the room is dark can be an issue. Fish don't have eyelids and don't tolerate going from complete dark to bright light (or vice versa) instantly.

In the morning open the curtains or turn the room light on at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the tank light on. This will reduce the stress on the fish and they won't go from a dark tank to a bright tank instantly.

At night turn the room light on and then turn the tank light off. Wait at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the room light out. This allows the fish to settle down for the night instead of going from a brightly lit tank to complete darkness instantly.

Try to have the lights on at the same time each day. Use a timer if possible.


--------------------
TWO LIGHT UNITS
If you have two light units on the tank, put them on timers and have one come on first, then an hour later the second one can come on. It will be less stressful for the fish.

In the evening, turn the first light off and wait an hour, then have the second light go out.

If the lights have a low, medium and high intensity setting, have them on low in the morning, then increase it to medium after a couple of hours, and then high for the main part of the day. In the evening, reverse this and have the medium setting for a few hours, then low. Then turn the lights off.
Wow thanks that helps so much
 

Byron

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Why are you buying bottled aquarium water? Do you have reason to think your tap water is not useable? What is the GH and pH of the bottled water? I will assume the tap water is drinkable (?) in Pennsylvania so the only issues would likely be parameters suitable to specific fish, meaning the hardness (GH, maybe KH) and pH.
 

Slaphppy7

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Why are you buying bottled aquarium water? Do you have reason to think your tap water is not useable? What is the GH and pH of the bottled water? I will assume the tap water is drinkable (?) in Pennsylvania so the only issues would likely be parameters suitable to specific fish, meaning the hardness (GH, maybe KH) and pH.
I didn't even know such a thing was sold...more "snake oil"
 
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daquestion4u

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Why are you buying bottled aquarium water? Do you have reason to think your tap water is not useable? What is the GH and pH of the bottled water? I will assume the tap water is drinkable (?) in Pennsylvania so the only issues would likely be parameters suitable to specific fish, meaning the hardness (GH, maybe KH) and pH.
I used tap wat
BOTTLED FISH WATER
I'm not sure how much you pay for the bottled aquarium water but it might be cheaper to buy bottled water from a supermarket, or dechlorinate your own tap water.

What is the GH (general hardness), KH (carbonate hardness) and pH of your water supply?
This information can usually be obtained from your water supply company's website or by telephoning them. If they can't help you, take a glass full of tap water to the local pet shop and get them to test it for you. Write the results down (in numbers) when they do the tests. And ask them what the results are in (eg: ppm, dGH, or something else).

If your tap water has a suitable pH, GH & KH, then you can use a dechlorinator to remove chlorine/ chloramine from the tap water to make it safe for the fish. This might be a cheaper option compared to buying bottles of water from a pet shop.

You might also want to get the bottled pet shop water tested for pH, GH & KH and see what it is.

Sorry if this sounds funny, but I have concerns about what they are selling as bottled aquarium water. It is not suitable for human consumption but is fine for fish?


--------------------
LIGHTING TIMES
Most aquarium plants like a bit of light and if you only have the light on for a couple of hours a day, they struggle. If the light doesn't have a high enough wattage they also struggle. Try having the tank lights on for 8-12 hours a day.

If you get lots of green algae then reduce the light by an hour a day and monitor the algae over the next 2 weeks.
If you don't get any green algae on the glass then increase the lighting period by an hour and monitor it.
If you get a small amount of algae then the lighting time is about right.

Some plants will close their leaves up when they have had sufficient light. Ambulia, Hygrophilas and a few others close their top set of leaves first, then the next set and so on down the stem. When you see this happening, wait an hour after the leaves have closed up against the stem and then turn lights off.

Plant lights should have equal amount of red and blue light and a bit less green light.


--------------------
TURNING LIGHTS ON AND OFF
Stress from tank lights coming on when the room is dark can be an issue. Fish don't have eyelids and don't tolerate going from complete dark to bright light (or vice versa) instantly.

In the morning open the curtains or turn the room light on at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the tank light on. This will reduce the stress on the fish and they won't go from a dark tank to a bright tank instantly.

At night turn the room light on and then turn the tank light off. Wait at least 30 minutes (or more) before turning the room light out. This allows the fish to settle down for the night instead of going from a brightly lit tank to complete darkness instantly.

Try to have the lights on at the same time each day. Use a timer if possible.


--------------------
TWO LIGHT UNITS
If you have two light units on the tank, put them on timers and have one come on first, then an hour later the second one can come on. It will be less stressful for the fish.

In the evening, turn the first light off and wait an hour, then have the second light go out.

If the lights have a low, medium and high intensity setting, have them on low in the morning, then increase it to medium after a couple of hours, and then high for the main part of the day. In the evening, reverse this and have the medium setting for a few hours, then low. Then turn the lights off.
One last question colin thanks for all your help my remaining raboras seemed much better today after the salt addition. When I added the salt to the tank shortly after i did I saw what appeared to be a Detritus Worm in the water column which one of My Rasboras promptly ate. I did a search of the bottom and am not seeing anymore wiggling around but what do i need to get rid of them or what should I do. Also my aquarium plants make it tough to clean the bottom I have a nice gravel vaccum but not sure how to get it past the plants without disturbing them. Do you have any recommendations for cleaning the bottom of the tank the majority is gravel from the back coming forward with a sandy front section of about 3 inches. The sandy front section i can clean fairly easily as there is not much there but a few rocks but the plants and decorations in the back/middle make it tough to get to the gravel in some areas

Detritus Worms​

 

Colin_T

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The worm is nothing to worry about unless hundreds suddenly appear on the glass and in the water. if that happens there is something wrong with the water and a 75% water change and gravel clean should be done asap.

Just use a basic gravel cleaner every week when you do a water change. You leave a couple of inches of undisturbed gravel around the base of each plant and gravel clean the rest.

If you have rocks or driftwood, gravel clean around it once a week and then once a month lift the rocks or wood and gravel clean under it.
 

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