Fill Hose

noobfish

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Looking to get a hose to run from the faucet for tank filling. Currently use a 3/4 gallon pitcher and that's about 30 trips a week when doing a water change. I was looking at some of those expanding/collapsing hoses for ease of storage. What I'm wondering is if any hose is ok or are there certain things I should be looking for that make one safer than the other in regards to not contaminating the water. Worried about chemical release.
 

Shiverz

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I do believe certain hoses are treated with some chemical that damages micro organisms such as algae etc, to stop any build-up or blockages within the pipe, so it would be best to stay away from those. Even when getting a new hose I would probably still run a fair amount of water through it just to thoroughly rinse it and be extra safe.

I've heard of a system called Python, it helps syphon your tank, clean your tank, fill your tank and I know a lot of people swear by it, even on here (it was once recommended to me as I was in a position much like you, I have weird hands too and frequently lose grip of buckets, which isn't ideal). I'm guessing since the Python was made for aquarium hobbyists, its hose would be free from contaminates that would harm the life in your tank. Though, it can be quite pricey compared to the regular price of a garden hose.
 
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Byron

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I've been using a Python since 1996 when I got my first large tank (90 gallon) and buckets were not going to work. When I moved into the house in 2000 (by then with two more larger tanks) I had to add two 25-foot extensions as it took 75 feet to get from the faucet/sink in the utility room to the fish room (same level fortunately). I'm now in a Townhouse and the standard 25-foot Python is adequate as the spare bathroom is next door to the fish room downstairs.

This both drains the tank and fills it, according to how the valve is set at the faucet. The draining does waste some water, and in summer I used to siphon out much of this for use in the garden. And you can run the Python outside to drain, not as fast in my experience but it saves running tap water down the drain.
 
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noobfish

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I've been using a Python since 1996 when I got my first large tank (90 gallon) and buckets were not going to work. When I moved into the house in 2000 (by then with two more larger tanks) I had to add two 25-foot extensions as it took 75 feet to get from the faucet/sink in the utility room to the fish room (same level fortunately). I'm now in a Townhouse and the standard 25-foot Python is adequate as the spare bathroom is next door to the fish room downstairs.

This both drains the tank and fills it, according to how the valve is set at the faucet. The draining does waste some water, and in summer I used to siphon out much of this for use in the garden. And you can run the Python outside to drain, not as fast in my experience but it saves running tap water down the drain.
The reviews of blowouts on the fittings have me concerned. I don't mind filling buckets with the waste water. It's the new water going in since it displaces substrate and everything when pouring. I've tried to syphon from bucket to tank, but then I'm left holding a 5g bucket over my head waiting on the water to run (stupid gravity!).
I may look into just getting some plastic hosing from the hardware store and installing hose fittings on the end. The slinky hoses just seemed so much easier to store.
 

Byron

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The reviews of blowouts on the fittings have me concerned. I don't mind filling buckets with the waste water. It's the new water going in since it displaces substrate and everything when pouring. I've tried to syphon from bucket to tank, but then I'm left holding a 5g bucket over my head waiting on the water to run (stupid gravity!).
I may look into just getting some plastic hosing from the hardware store and installing hose fittings on the end. The slinky hoses just seemed so much easier to store.

A few things here. First, the benefit of using the Python to drain is that you can vacuum the substrate (if that is needed) and I have found this extremely beneficial. It is slower running than the manual short water changer, so less likely to suck up fish, easier to control, does a more thorough job in the time period.

I'm still using the original Python I bought in 1996. The faucet adapter has become threadbare and I have replaced it I think three times in those nearly 30 years, but nothing else has failed. "Python" is the original make, and Aqueon also makes the same basic device though I found the Aquaeon faucet adapter a bit sturdier and easier to operate. These parts are interchangeable, and given the cost there is no point in buying the whole new device when the faucet adapter needs replacing.

I do use a bucket to refill my 10g as it is easy to over-run such a small tank. A plastic pitcher can be used to dip into the bucket and then pour an easy stream, perhaps against your hand to further reduce the force.
 

realzalio

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i believe that "python" water change products are overpriced for something that you can put together yourself.
i use flexible PVC tubing connected to a filter intake piece (if small fish are present, i put a sponge over it) and siphon starter for water changes - you just need to make sure that the tubing, and any connectors, are good for potable water (usually it will say for potable, NSF 61, or something like that).
 
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noobfish

noobfish

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A few things here. First, the benefit of using the Python to drain is that you can vacuum the substrate (if that is needed) and I have found this extremely beneficial. It is slower running than the manual short water changer, so less likely to suck up fish, easier to control, does a more thorough job in the time period.

I'm still using the original Python I bought in 1996. The faucet adapter has become threadbare and I have replaced it I think three times in those nearly 30 years, but nothing else has failed. "Python" is the original make, and Aqueon also makes the same basic device though I found the Aquaeon faucet adapter a bit sturdier and easier to operate. These parts are interchangeable, and given the cost there is no point in buying the whole new device when the faucet adapter needs replacing.

I do use a bucket to refill my 10g as it is easy to over-run such a small tank. A plastic pitcher can be used to dip into the bucket and then pour an easy stream, perhaps against your hand to further reduce the force.
I do currently use a syphon/gravel vac and clean substrate every water change (darn poop machine pleco). I was just looking for a quicker way to fill. I like the python, but recent reviews online seem to have a lot of people having issues with the fittings blowing apart and spraying water everywhere. Possibly, like many things, the first iteration was of higher quality and the company has since looked to cut production costs. And the waste of water from the faucet to activate the syphon. Seems they could have installed a bulb hand pump in there.
 

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