Algae and spotty java fern

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Lamie

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Revers Osmosis water. filtered water that has almost all minerals removed.


I suggested that you Don't trim or remove plants. My recommendation is to Solve the nutrient deficiency first! Trimming them when they are weak could kill them.

Determine what your GH is and then lest us know. If it is low consider boosting GH. Another question how often do you do a wterchange and how much water do you change out?
He did some calculations as my area as it is supplied by four treatment plants.



"The KH and GH vary so averaging the data the results fall within the 0-4 dGH/dKH zone, around 2 usually for both. Which is soft/very soft water in terms of hardness".

I'm going to change the fish in my tank. What should I do about the plants?
Thanks
 
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Based on your photos you have a mobil nutrient deficiency. Mobil nutrients are Nitogen, potassium, magnesium chloride, and Molybdenum. Your nitrate reasding is not zero so we can rule out nitrogen. Mybest guess is Magnesium deficiency. Are you using RO or softened water? And is your water soft or hard. Do you know what your water GH is?

Algae is the frequent caused by a mobil nutrient deficiency.

Mobil nutrient are nutrients that the plant can remove from old leaves and them moved to support the new growth. When a mobil nutrient is in short supply it is removed from older leaves and then the old leaf dies. This commonly results in a long stem with a few leaves at the top. I would not time any plants at this time. You need to restore the plants to health first If you don't and trim them they likely will die.

GH or general hardness test measures the total amount of Magnesium and calcium Plants need both to grow but only magnesium is mobil. There are test kits for GH. If your GH needs to be increased you can use a GH booster such as Seachem equilibrium or Seachem Replenish to add calcium and magneisum to your water. you only need to boost your GH by 2 to 3 degrees hardness to have sufficient GH for your plants.
The GH is 2. Is this going to cause a magnesium defíciency or is that a separate issue to the soft water. Or is it a side effect of the low GH. Do I add Seachem Replenish to boost the GH which would take care of the mineral deficiency and improve the condition of the plants?
 

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"The KH and GH vary so averaging the data the results fall within the 0-4 dGH/dKH zone, around 2 usually for both. Which is soft/very soft water in terms of hardness".
YOur tap water GH probably changes seasonally with the weather. During wet months the GH will drop and in dry months it probably increase.

The GH is 2. Is this going to cause a magnesium defíciency or is that a separate issue to the soft water. Or is it a side effect of the low GH.
With a GH as low as yours you might occationally have a magnesium deficiency. Other times you might have a calcium deficiency. I think your should could check your GH after your weekly water change and if the GH drop add a small amount of a GH booster as needed to maintain a stable value. Also keep a record of your GH measurements it might be helpful later one. The key is to not add a lot. Just use enough to stabilize your GH. Your plants probably more than one degree of GH booster don't Plants don't need much GH.
 
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I never use RO. I can get back to you tomorrow with the GH is. Thanks
I would like to know if you can help me solve the nutrient deficiency you mentioned so I can add plants and trim. The GH is 2dGH. You mentioned not adding or trimming the plants until I have solved the nutrient deficiency but I'm not sure how to solve it. I actually have seen a bit more growth on 1plant because I have been putting the light on for 7 hours. (I have some plants I would like to plant in the aquarium waiting in a bucket of water) will it be alright to plant them? Thanks
 

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I really think this is getting way too complicated. Java Fern is a slow-growing plant. That means it needs less intense light, and proportionally less nutrients. This plant will usually grow very well (I won't say thrive always, but certainly not struggle) in almost any water. My water has zero GH and this plant has managed well for years. It does seem to be better when I am regular with my weekly dose of Flourish Comprehensive Supplement, I admit. I let it go in my 3-foot 33g back in 2013-2016 and it nearly took over the tank, photo below. Th floating plants are useful to shade the light.
 

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i have a java fern that gets 10 hours of light a day i dont use any fertiliser and my water is naturally a little hard it grows just fine no C02 no RO Water no root tabs no fertiliser

grows just like it should
 

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Your water looks crystal clear. I think you need to back off the water changes a bit. Plus adding a fast growing plant or plants. Crypts,Java fern, are slow to get going.
I think you want a plant tank..but you need to add plants now rather then the long wait of the few you have to fill in.
 
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Your water looks crystal clear. I think you need to back off the water changes a bit. Plus adding a fast growing plant or plants. Crypts,Java fern, are slow to get going.
I think you want a plant tank..but you need to add plants now rather then the long wait of the few you have to fill in.
OK I can do that. Would that be every fortnight?
 

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Sounds about right. You might even see the Java fern become greener with no additives. You could add Potassium also. Java ferns really do better with it..but just observe how your system reacts.
 
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I really think this is getting way too complicated. Java Fern is a slow-growing plant. That means it needs less intense light, and proportionally less nutrients. This plant will usually grow very well (I won't say thrive always, but certainly not struggle) in almost any water. My water has zero GH and this plant has managed well for years. It does seem to be better when I am regular with my weekly dose of Flourish Comprehensive Supplement, I admit. I let it go in my 3-foot 33g back in 2013-2016 and it nearly took over the tank, photo below. Th floating plants are useful to shade the light.
I like watching the java fern grow. The many new leaves are green. It's just that I was disappointed that the older leaves are going brown and not growing. I wondered if I was doing something wrong but have found out there is so much more to take into consideration when it comes to keeping fish.
 

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I like watching the java fern grow. The many new leaves are green. It's just that I was disappointed that the older leaves are going brown and not growing. I wondered if I was doing something wrong but have found out there is so much more to take into consideration when it comes to keeping fish.
I wouldn't fret too much about the ferns...it's quite normal that leaves die off and, as you've seen, you get bright green new ones growing soon enough. If the water was 'bad', or lacking nutrients, or if the plant itself was diseased, this wouldn't be happening.
The young ferns take their nourishment from the water AND from the parent leaf.
I've just cleared off some of my dead Java fern leaves and those with youngsters attached, I've left floating around in the tank, still attached to the old leaf. I didn't have to do this, but did it by way of an assessment re numbers, as I have plans for them later on.
 
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i have a java fern that gets 10 hours of light a day i dont use any fertiliser and my water is naturally a little hard it grows just fine no C02 no RO Water no root tabs no fertiliser

grows just like it should
Do you cut your Java fern rhizome when it gets long. My Java fern is close to reaching the end of the driftwood it grown on. When I need to cut the rhizome where do I cut it. Is it between the nodes. Will that be fine? And I guess it will be ok to plant it on the drift wood.
 

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Do you cut your Java fern rhizome when it gets long. My Java fern is close to reaching the end of the driftwood it grown on. When I need to cut the rhizome where do I cut it. Is it between the nodes. Will that be fine? And I guess it will be ok to plant it on the drift wood.
to be totally honest ive done absolutely nothing to it left it in the pot and put that straight in the tank

@Bruce Leyland-Jones will know more than me about this
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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Do you cut your Java fern rhizome when it gets long. My Java fern is close to reaching the end of the driftwood it grown on. When I need to cut the rhizome where do I cut it. Is it between the nodes. Will that be fine? And I guess it will be ok to plant it on the drift wood.
Yes, you can cut the rhizome and cut it where you suggest and tie it/glue it to wood.
Keep an eye out for the small ferns growing on leaves, especially those with roots hanging down from the underside of the leaf. These are ideal for transplanting onto wood.

DSCN4251.JPG
 

Byron

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You should have several nodes on the piece you cut off, so let it grow a bit further past the end of the present wood, then cut it between two nodes and the cut portion will (should) have three or more nodes. The nodes are the points along the rhizome from which the fronds and roots grow out.
 

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