Water conditions..........

beatking

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PH = 7.6
High PH = 7.8
Ammonia = 0.0 ppm
Nitrite = 0.0 ppm
Nitrate = 0.0 ppm

Are these acceptable numbers? Thank you. All tested with API Master Test Kit. Well water

Steve
 

itiwhetu

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What kind of fish are you keeping is the most important question? Also, water hardness is important to know. Does your tank have live plants?
 

itiwhetu

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The Ammonia, Nitrite and Nitrate numbers are great and just where you want them. The pH is a little high for my liking.
 
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beatking

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Keeping community fish ie. danios, neons, platys, rasboras, etc. our water leans towards being med/hard. Will be planted
 
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Colin_T

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Having ammonia, nitrite and nitrate at 0ppm is perfect. However, as itiwhetu said, pH and GH are important and these should be taken into account when choosing fish, as should tank size.

What are the tank dimensions (length x width x height)?

What is the GH (general hardness) and KH (carbonate hardness) of your water supply?
This information can usually be obtained from your water supply company's website or by telephoning them. If they can't help you, take a glass full of tap water to the local pet shop and get them to test it for you. Write the results down (in numbers) when they do the tests. And ask them what the results are in (eg: ppm, dGH, or something else).

Depending on what the GH of your water is, will determine what fish you should keep.

Angelfish, most tetras, barbs, Bettas, gouramis, rasbora, Corydoras and small species of suckermouth catfish all occur in soft water (GH below 150ppm) and a pH below 7.0.

Livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), rainbowfish and goldfish occur in medium hard water with a GH around 200-250ppm and a pH above 7.0.

If you have very hard water (GH above 300ppm) then look at African Rift Lake cichlids, or use distilled or reverse osmosis water to reduce the GH and keep fishes from softer water.
 

itiwhetu

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Keeping community fish ie. danios, neons, platys, rasboras, etc. our water leans towards being hard. Will be planted
Plant it now, as all those fish will benefit from live plants being in their tank. Then see if the pH moves towards 7 a little.
 
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GH was tested at 150 ppm while KH was tested at 100 ppm. This was conducted three times using API GH & KH Test Kit.
Ran it three separate times cleaning out the test tubes and results were identical. Thanks to all who responded here

Steve
 
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beatking

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Having ammonia, nitrite and nitrate at 0ppm is perfect. However, as itiwhetu said, pH and GH are important and these should be taken into account when choosing fish, as should tank size.

What are the tank dimensions (length x width x height)?

What is the GH (general hardness) and KH (carbonate hardness) of your water supply?
This information can usually be obtained from your water supply company's website or by telephoning them. If they can't help you, take a glass full of tap water to the local pet shop and get them to test it for you. Write the results down (in numbers) when they do the tests. And ask them what the results are in (eg: ppm, dGH, or something else).

Depending on what the GH of your water is, will determine what fish you should keep.

Angelfish, most tetras, barbs, Bettas, gouramis, rasbora, Corydoras and small species of suckermouth catfish all occur in soft water (GH below 150ppm) and a pH below 7.0.

Livebearers (guppies, platies, swordtails, mollies), rainbowfish and goldfish occur in medium hard water with a GH around 200-250ppm and a pH above 7.0.

If you have very hard water (GH above 300ppm) then look at African Rift Lake cichlids, or use distilled or reverse osmosis water to reduce the GH and keep fishes from softer water.
Tank dimensions are 30 inches long by 12 inches wide by 18 inches tall. It's a 29 gallon tank using well water with results described above. Hardness test recently run at 150 GH and KH at 100
 

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PH = 7.6
High PH = 7.8
Ammonia = 0.0 ppm
Nitrite = 0.0 ppm
Nitrate = 0.0 ppm

Are these acceptable numbers? Thank you. All tested with API Master Test Kit. Well water

Steve
Once you add fish they create ammonia, which is why tanks need to be cycled first.
 

Essjay

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PH = 7.6
High PH = 7.8
Ammonia = 0.0 ppm
Nitrite = 0.0 ppm
Nitrate = 0.0 ppm

Are these acceptable numbers? Thank you. All tested with API Master Test Kit. Well water

Steve

You don't say whether there are fish in the tank now. In post #4 you give a list of fish but it is not clear if the fish are in the tank now, or if it's a list of fish you want to have.

If there are fish in the tank those test results are good.
If there are no fish in the tank, it depends whether it's been cycled or not. An uncycled tank contains just plain tap water so the results should be good because there's nothing to make them bad yet. But if the tank has been through a fishless cycle, the results are good.


Will be planted
How many plants and what kind? If you plan a lot of fast growing plants you can do a plant cycle. Plant the tank and wait until there is obvious growth. Taking a photo of the newly planted tank will give you something to compare the plants to. Once the plants are growing well, fish can be added a batch at a time, checking ammonia and nitrite between batches to make sure they are staying at zero. That's assuming you don't have fish at the moment!
 

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